Journalism in the Public Interest



Orthopedic Board Hasn’t Adopted Surgeon Scorecard After All

A new statement by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery says its executive director “miscommunicated” his own preference without getting necessary approval.

Former Las Vegas Water Czar Joins Board of Casino Giant

Patricia Mulroy’s appointment to the board at Wynn Resorts re-ignites debate about her performance during a time of explosive growth and worsening drought.

Paul Ryan Reading Guide: The Best Reporting on the House Republican

We’re going beyond the horse race and gathering the best stories out there on Congressman Ryan and his positions.

U.S. Lawmakers Call for More Oversight of Workers’ Comp

In response to a ProPublica and NPR investigation, members of Congress are urging the labor secretary to come up with a plan to protect injured workers and taxpayers.

Johnson & Johnson Emerges Victorious in Lawsuit on Tylenol’s Risks

Hundreds of cases are pending that involve claims that Tylenol has caused liver damage and deaths. The pain reliever’s maker won a jury verdict in the first.

Would Washington’s FDA Fix Cure the Patients or the Drug Industry?

A bill that would speed up approval for medications and medical devices shows how a major initiative can get traction even in the midst of Washington gridlock — but critics say all the lobbying is drowning out some warnings about patient safety.

What You Need to Know About the Latest Drone Revelations

Podcast: The Intercept reporters Cora Currier and Ryan Deveraux talk with ProPublica’s Eric Umansky about their big scoop on drone strikes.

Medicare Spending for Hepatitis C Cures Surges

The cost of drugs for the liver disease in the first half of 2015 almost matches the total for all of 2014.

Los Angeles County Examines Troubled Group Home’s Finances

As a group home for some of the state’s most troubled children prepares to close, county auditors are poring over its finances.

New Trial Records: Doctors Recommended Tylenol — But Only at Lower Doses

Internal company documents that have emerged in a New Jersey trial make clear that marketing for Tylenol did not convey doctors’ concerns about its risks.

Inside Corporate America’s Campaign To Ditch Workers’ Comp

One Texas lawyer is helping companies opt out of workers’ compensation and write their own rules. What does it mean for injured workers?

Price Check: How Companies Value Body Parts

Benefits for the same body part can differ dramatically depending on which company you work for.

Orthopedic Board Will Use Surgeon Scorecard to Help Re-certify Docs

The American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery says ProPublica’s analysis can help identify surgeons with a high rate of complications.

Reporting Recipe: How to Investigate Student Debt at Your College

Here are five stories you can do using ProPublica’s interactive database, Debt by Degrees. Each one comes complete with easy-to-follow, step-by-step instructions.

Trekking With Refugees Across Europe: An Up-Close View

Podcast: New York Times reporter Anemona Hartocollis shares her experiences on the front lines of the European refugee crisis.

Your Smart Home Knows a Lot About You

A data scientist’s experiment reveals surprising information about interconnected smart devices.

Dealmakers Drop a Plan to Divert Millions from the Health Insurance of Retired Coal Miners

A bankruptcy plan for Patriot Coal Corp. would have thrown into question the medical coverage of 208 miners, wives and widows.

Bill Would Add Nurses, Physician Assistants to Pharma Payments Database

Drugmakers disclose their payments to doctors, dentists, even chiropractors. But spending on nurse practitioners and physician assistants is excluded. Legislation in the Senate would change that.

November 2015

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