ProPublica

Journalism in the Public Interest

Cancel

Archives

Stanford Promises Not to Use Google Money for Privacy Research

Stanford's Center for Internet and Society has long received funding from Google, but a filing shows the university recently pledged to only use the money for non-privacy research. Academics say such promises are problematic. 

Podcast: How Insurers Are Charging You More for Your Generic Drugs

Some insurers are starting to charge patients more out of pocket for generic drugs, including those that treat chronic illnesses like epilepsy and diabetes. Increased co-payments can limit options for such patients. Charles Ornstein discusses what consumers can do to avoid higher prices.

The Best Reporting on PTSD in Children Exposed to Violence

What happens to children and teenagers exposed to violence in their own neighborhoods.

How Detectives Coaxed Suspect in Etan Patz Murder to Confess

Pedro Hernandez, a man with an IQ of 70 and history of mental illness, confessed to strangling a 6-year-old boy after investigators appealed to his religious faith.

Everything That’s Happened Since Supreme Court Ruled on Voting Rights Act

Ahead of the November midterms, we take stock of the state of voting rights across the country.

Keep on Pushing

Fifty years after Freedom Summer, two Mississippi sisters press the fight for voting rights.

A New Way Insurers are Shifting Costs to the Sick

By charging higher prices for generic drugs that treat certain illness, health insurers may be violating the spirit of the Affordable Care Act, which bans discrimination against those with pre-existing conditions.

Old Debts, Fresh Pain: Weak Laws Offer Debtors Little Protection

Critics say the 1968 federal law that allows collectors to take 25 percent of debtors' wages, or every penny in their bank accounts, is out of date and overly harsh.

Confession of Etan Patz’s Accused Killer Finally Aired in Court

Pedro Hernandez confessed two years ago to killing the 6-year-old. Now a judge will decide whether it's admissible.

Podcast: In Big Tobacco Cash, a Boon Turned Burden

Reporter Cezary Podkul on why states’ deals with investors yielded money upfront but problematic debts later.

Unseen Toll: Wages of Millions Seized to Pay Past Debts

A new study provides the first-ever tally of how many employees lose up to a quarter of their paychecks over debts like unpaid credit card or medical bills and student loans.

Getting Sued Over Debt: Readers Tell Their Stories

Some describe their surprise when they were sued after falling behind on medical and credit card bills.

Border Patrol’s ‘Trigger-Happy’ Reputation and More in MuckReads Weekly

Some of the best #MuckReads we read this week. Want to receive these by email? Sign up to get this briefing delivered to your inbox every weekend.

Why Do Democrats Keep Trying to Ban Guns That Look Scary, Not the Guns That Kill the Most People?

On the twentieth anniversary of the assault weapons ban, a look at why politicians and the public support a policy that showed no evidence of saving lives.

In Patz Case, a Critical Moment in Court at Last

After more than 800 days behind bars, the man accused of killing Etan Patz will have his confession evaluated by a judge.

The Fed Hates To Burst Your Bubble

Why Gun Control Groups Have Moved Away from an Assault Weapons Ban

A decade after the ban expired, gun control groups say that focusing on other policies will save more American lives.

U.S. Company Helps Russia Block Prominent Putin Critic

The U.S. blogging company LiveJournal is showing an error message to users inside Russia who try to read the blog of Alexei Navalny, a prominent politician and critic of the Russian government.

Podcast: Guns, PTSD, and the ‘Data-Free Debate’

ProPublica Reporter Lois Beckett explores shooting victims’ trauma and the politics that stifle the research and treatment they need.

October 2014

S M T W T F S
28 29 301 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31 1