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In Healthcare Suit Against Catholic Bishops, the Specter of an Early Defeat

The ACLU’s case against the U.S. Bishops Conference – heralded by some as a bold legal stroke – could be thwarted on procedural grounds.

Ad Endorsing da Vinci Robot Violated U of Illinois Policies, Review Finds

When surgical team members endorsed the robot in an ad, controversy ensued. An internal review finds no ill intent, but says policies were violated, calls for clearer rules.

A Conceptual Model for Interactive Databases in News

As part of a conference about archiving news applications, a group of journalists developed a framework to understand how interactive databases -- sometimes called news applications -- are made.

A Stillborn Child, A Charge of Murder and the Disputed Case Law on ‘Fetal Harm’

Rennie Gibbs is facing life in prison for taking cocaine during her pregnancy. Hers is among a burgeoning number of cases in which women are prosecuted for allegedly endangering their unborn children.

Who Controls the Kochs’ Political Network? ASMI, SLAH and TOHE

Obscure limited liability companies have ultimate say over the Koch network’s nonprofits, which spend hundreds of millions of dollars to advance conservative causes.

The Price of an Internship

Unpaid internships can help young workers advance their career goals. But they can also vary significantly in cost and quality. Explore college internship programs at different schools across the United States — or tell us about your experience interning for academic credit.

Four Ways to Really Fix the Pentagon’s Effort to ID the Missing

Changes must go beyond bureaucracy to update the scientific approach and embrace outside help.

High-Cost Lender World Finance Target of Federal Probe

The investigation follows a ProPublica story that detailed the company’s lending practices.

Are You an Internship Coordinator?

Help us understand how internship policies are structured at schools across the U.S. by telling us about your university

Podcast: Reporting on Plane Crashes

With Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in the news, Steve Engelberg and Joe Sexton discuss the difficulties of reporting on the ever-shifting landscape of plane crashes.

Chesapeake Energy’s $5 Billion Shuffle

The energy giant raised the cash it needed to survive by slashing royalties it paid property owners to drill on their land.

Drug Company Agrees to Pay $27.6 Million to Settle Allegations Involving Chicago Psychiatrist

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. was accused of paying Michael Reinstein, a psychiatrist who has figured into two ProPublica investigations, to overprescribe a risky antipsychotic.

Sex, Gender, and the Familiar Fight Over Religious Exemptions

Nina Martin talks with a leading expert on the historic tension between civil rights and religious freedom.

Podcast: The Military’s Slow and Backward Approach to Identifying MIAs

The Pentagon spends roughly $100 million a year to identify service members “missing in action” from World War II and other conflicts, but the effort has proven incredibly slow and inefficient, ProPublica’s Megan McCloskey found.

Doctor Payments on the Decline

Pharmaceutical company payments to health care professionals dropped between 2011 and 2012 among most of the companies and categories ProPublica tracks, driven in part by increased transparency as well as blockbuster drugs losing patent protection. Research payments, however, have increased among th

A Modern Day ‘Harvest of Shame’

Today’s blue collar temp laborers face abuses similar to those of migrant farmworkers depicted in iconic 1960 CBS documentary.

The Perils of Problematic Prescribing: A Double Dose of Warnings

Two new reports from the CDC show the dangers of overprescribing narcotics and antibiotics. Is there a way for doctors and consumers to make better decisions?

Interview: How You Can Help Find an MIA

John Eakin shares what he learned about tracking down the remains of his cousin who died in a World War II POW camp.

Podcast: The Winners (and Losers) of College Financial Aid

Universities have become increasingly strategic about how they use their financial aid, but who they’re awarding money to and for what remains unclear. Marian Wang and Eric Umansky discuss the information imbalance at the center of the admissions and financial-aid process.