ProPublica

Journalism in the Public Interest

Cancel

Archives

Are You an Internship Coordinator?

Help us understand how internship policies are structured at schools across the U.S. by telling us about your university

Podcast: Reporting on Plane Crashes

With Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in the news, Steve Engelberg and Joe Sexton discuss the difficulties of reporting on the ever-shifting landscape of plane crashes.

Chesapeake Energy’s $5 Billion Shuffle

The energy giant raised the cash it needed to survive by slashing royalties it paid property owners to drill on their land.

Drug Company Agrees to Pay $27.6 Million to Settle Allegations Involving Chicago Psychiatrist

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. was accused of paying Michael Reinstein, a psychiatrist who has figured into two ProPublica investigations, to overprescribe a risky antipsychotic.

Sex, Gender, and the Familiar Fight Over Religious Exemptions

Nina Martin talks with a leading expert on the historic tension between civil rights and religious freedom.

Podcast: The Military’s Slow and Backward Approach to Identifying MIAs

The Pentagon spends roughly $100 million a year to identify service members “missing in action” from World War II and other conflicts, but the effort has proven incredibly slow and inefficient, ProPublica’s Megan McCloskey found.

Doctor Payments on the Decline

Pharmaceutical company payments to health care professionals dropped between 2011 and 2012 among most of the companies and categories ProPublica tracks, driven in part by increased transparency as well as blockbuster drugs losing patent protection. Research payments, however, have increased among th

A Modern Day ‘Harvest of Shame’

Today’s blue collar temp laborers face abuses similar to those of migrant farmworkers depicted in iconic 1960 CBS documentary.

The Perils of Problematic Prescribing: A Double Dose of Warnings

Two new reports from the CDC show the dangers of overprescribing narcotics and antibiotics. Is there a way for doctors and consumers to make better decisions?

Interview: How You Can Help Find an MIA

John Eakin shares what he learned about tracking down the remains of his cousin who died in a World War II POW camp.

Podcast: The Winners (and Losers) of College Financial Aid

Universities have become increasingly strategic about how they use their financial aid, but who they’re awarding money to and for what remains unclear. Marian Wang and Eric Umansky discuss the information imbalance at the center of the admissions and financial-aid process.

Bud’s Story, from the Records

Private Arthur ‘Bud’ Kelder died as a POW in the Philippines during World War II. Here are letters and others documents from his case from 1941 to 1950.

The Military is Leaving the Missing Behind

Private Bud Kelder went missing during World War II. Evidence suggests he's buried as an unknown soldier in Manila. Will the Pentagon ever move to identify him?

Time Since Eakin Gave Military Evidence on Bud

On June 11, 2011, Eakin filed a formal petition with the Army detailing all the evidence suggesting his cousin Bud could be found. The military has declined to move ahead with the case.

Drilling for Certainty: The Latest in Fracking Health Studies

ProPublica surveys some recent research on potential health implications of hydro fracking.

Chart: Trauma Hospitals Fail to Screen for Civilian PTSD

We asked 21 top-level trauma centers in cities with the nation's highest murder rates whether they screen injured patients for signs of PTSD.

Why Hospitals Are Failing Civilians Who Get PTSD

More than 20 percent of civilians with traumatic injuries may develop PTSD. Trauma surgeons explain why many hospitals aren’t doing anything about it.

Medicare’s Drug Program Needs Stronger Protections Against Fraud, Watchdog Says

A new report finds that more than half of insurance companies in Medicare’s drug program haven’t reported fraud cases to the government. The findings echo an earlier ProPublica investigation that found fraud flourishing in the program.

As Full Disclosure Nears, Doctors’ Pay for Drug Talks Plummets

As transparency increases and blockbuster drugs lose patent protection, drug companies have dramatically scaled back payments to doctors for promotional talks. This fall, all drug and medical device companies will be required to report payments to doctors.