Journalism in the Public Interest



What Can Be Done Right Now to Fix the Legal System for Debt Collection

America’s out-of-date, unfair laws for collecting debts could be dramatically improved by these simple steps.

The Color of Debt: How Collection Suits Squeeze Black Neighborhoods

In a first-of-its-kind analysis, ProPublica reveals that the suits are far more common in black communities than white ones.

The Color of Debt

The black neighborhoods where collection suits hit hardest

How We Analyzed Racial Disparity in Debt Collection Lawsuits

An explanation of how we analyzed whether debt collection lawsuits disproportionately impact black communities.

Our Rebuttal to RAND’s Critique of Surgeon Scorecard

The think tank claims Scorecard’s methods aren’t reliable, but its commentary is undermined by supposition, conflicts of interest and a lack of evidence.

Verizon’s Zombie Cookie Gets New Life

Verizon is merging its cellphone tracking supercookie with AOL’s ad tracking network to match users’ online habits with their offline details.

An Arrest, a Suicide, a Year Later: The Lasting Tragedy of Kalief Browder

Podcast: New Yorker staff writer Jennifer Gonnerman discusses her reporting on a teenager who, after spending three years on Rikers Island without being convicted of a crime, took his own life.

Is the Gun Lobby’s Power Overstated?

The National Rifle Association and other anti-gun-control groups are formidable, but political trends may be loosening their grip on lawmakers.

Blankenship’s Grip on Coal Country, Biker Gangs and More in #MuckReads Weekly

Some of the best #MuckReads we read this week. Want to receive these by email?  Sign up to get this briefing delivered to your inbox every weekend.

The Prominence and Plight Of Girls in the Juvenile Justice System

Girls, many of whom have suffered a range of trauma at home, make up a growing share of children arrested and detained across the country.

Bankruptcy Lawyers Strip Cash from Coal Miners’ Health Insurance

Workers often bear the brunt of the coal industry’s decline. One case stands out: 208 Indiana miners, wives and widows whose health care may fall to financial engineering.

How States Handle Drug Use During Pregnancy

Across the country, hundreds of pregnant women and new mothers have been accused of child abuse or other crimes when they or their newborns tested positive for controlled substances. Laws on drug testing of infants and new mothers vary, but the stakes are always high. In many places, women lose thei

How Some Alabama Hospitals Quietly Drug Test New Mothers — Without Their Consent

As hundreds of Alabama women face child endangerment charges, hospitals are mostly mum on their testing policies – even with the patients.

Two Who Moved Through Europe’s Revolving-Door Prisons Get Terrorist Designation

Authorities say former members of a Paris neighborhood gang ended up aiding the Charlie Hebdo attack, recruiting militant fighters to Syria.

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Senator Wants Names of Red Cross Officials Who Didn’t Cooperate With Government Inquiry

Sen. Charles Grassley is demanding more information about the American Red Cross and its “apparent unwillingness to fully cooperate” with a government investigation into its disaster relief work.

Behind Debt by Degrees: How Can You Tell If a College Is Helping Poor Students?

Podcast: We take a closer look inside ProPublica’s new interactive database, guided by reporters and developers Sisi Wei and Annie Waldman.

The Stories of Everyday Lives, Hidden in Reams of Data

Data journalists use data to tell stories that help readers make better choices and live better lives.

Exploding Gas Tanks, Defective Air Bags and Other Car-Company Scandals (MuckReads Weekly)

There’s a long history of car company scandals – and sluggish responses from regulators.

November 2015

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