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Podcast: Why Settlements Don’t Fix Wrongful Convictions

Senior Editor Joe Sexton talks about Jabbar Collins’s $10 million settlement with New York City and the long road to an end to prosecutorial misconduct.

South Carolina’s Lax Domestic Abuse Laws and More in MuckReads Weekly

The Post and Courier investigates South Carolina's lax domestic abuse laws and more in #MuckReads weekly

“Less Lethal” Flash-Bangs Used in Ferguson Leave Some Feeling the Burn

A journalist says he was singed by a flash-bang fired by St. Louis County police trying to disperse a crowd, raising questions about how to use these military-style devices safely and appropriately.

In California, Some Efforts to Toughen Oversight of Assisted Living Falter

Cost concerns may derail efforts by lawmakers and advocates to require more frequent inspections and a swifter response to allegations of abuse and neglect.

Big Investors Push for Auditors to Sign Financial Statements

The trade group representing institutional investors urges Securities and Exchange Commission not to weaken plans to make auditors publicly accountable for their work.

Paying Jabbar Collins $10 Million Doesn’t Address Problems With Prosecutors

A wrongly convicted Brooklyn man will receive millions in compensation from New York City, but that doesn’t address the broader lack of consequences when prosecutors abuse their power.

New York City Will Pay $10 Million to Settle Wrongful Conviction Case

Revelations about the prosecution of Jabbar Collins, who served 15 years for a murder he did not commit, helped to bring down longtime Brooklyn District Attorney Charles Hynes

Interview With Civil Rights Legend John Lewis: Audio

Listen to Nikole Hannah-Jones interview barrier-breaking Freedom Rider and longtime congressman John Lewis.

Long a Force for Progress, a Freedom Summer Legend Looks Back

Georgia Congressman John Lewis talks about what changed — and didn’t — because of the movement he helped to lead 50 years ago.

The Best Reporting on Federal Push to Militarize Local Police

A few facts you might have missed about the flow of military equipment and tactics to local law enforcement.

What to Look For In Dueling Autopsies of Michael Brown

Post Mortem by Michael Baden is only the beginning as teams of specialists study the body of 18-year-old African American killed by police.

How Tobacco Bonds Work, and What Can Go Wrong

States and localities got cash up front but may end up paying back a lot more than they expected.

Q&A: The Hidden Costs of Tobacco Debt

Even when taxpayers aren't explicitly on the hook, tobacco bonds can cost states and local governments money. Here's how.

Podcast: The Pitfalls of Drug Testing in Sports

Reporter David Epstein explains the various doping methods athletes use to increase their performance – and why drug testing always seems a step behind.

Government Will Withhold One-Third of the Records from Database of Physician Payments

Many payments to doctors made by pharmaceutical and medical device companies will not be included in the public release of the database next month. Federal officials cite data inconsistencies, say records will be posted next June.

Six Days in Ferguson: Voices from the Protests

A day-by-day chronology of what happened in Ferguson, drawn from the best reporting by journalists and witnesses on the ground.

Red Cross Reverses Stance on Sandy Spending “Trade Secrets”

The charity has released some new details on how it spent over $300 million raised after the storm.

USA Discounters Agrees to Refund $5 Charge Collected in What Feds Called A “Fee Scam”

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s action addresses one small aspect of the company’s business practices which also includes thousands of lawsuits against service members who fall behind on their payments.

October 2014

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