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Over 1,100 Health Data Breaches, but Few Fines

Since October 2009, health care organizations and their business partners reported 1,142 large-scale data breaches, each affecting at least 500 people, to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Of those, seven breaches have resulted in fines.

Has Your Medical Privacy Been Compromised? Help ProPublica Investigate

Help us cover patient privacy and how breaches are affecting patients.

Fines Remain Rare Even As Health Data Breaches Multiply

Federal health watchdogs say they are cracking down on organizations that don’t protect the privacy and security of patient records, but data suggests otherwise.

Net Neutrality May Face an Uphill Battle If History Tells Us Anything

The FCC’s current net neutrality proposal is just its latest attempt at regulating internet companies, but there have been others.

New York City Lays Out Limits on Restraints And Suspensions

Amid recent calls for reform, New York City’s Department of Education is introducing new restrictions on suspending and restraining kids in city schools.

Newly Discovered Evidence is Latest Surprise in Patz Case

Defense lawyers question whether mistrial is warranted after lost evidence surfaces in case of missing boy.

Podcast: When Those We Report On Complain

Lessons from our point-by-point refutation of the Red Cross’ request for corrections, and Does Donald Trump use email?

When a Wildlife Rehab Center Regulates Charter Schools: Inside the Wild World of Charter Regulation

Charter school “authorizers” are charged with making sure schools can be trusted with kids and with public money. Problem is, many lack the tools to do the job.

Red Cross Demands Corrections to Our ‘Misleading’ Coverage. Here’s Our Response

The Red Cross' response comes months after our initial coverage, which we stand by.

In Complicated Patz Case, Informant Could Testify About Suspect Not on Trial

The defense in the Patz murder trial will argue another man is more likelier the killer of the young boy. Jack Colbert might help make that case.

Podcast: An Expert’s Take on a High-Profile ‘Suicide’ in Argentina

Sebastian Rotella on the death of a powerful Argentine prosecutor and the ways a long history of corruption stokes suspicions of foul play.

A History of Violence: Accusations But No Justice in Liberia

Many of those accused of unspeakable brutality during Liberia’s civil war have never been formally tried.

Internet Censorship in China: We’ll Sing it for You

One Chinese government agency is so proud of how well they censor the Internet that they put their feelings to music.

Connecticut Schools Pin Down and Restrain ‘Staggering’ Number of Kids

A new state report found one public school student was restrained more than 700 times in one year.

Judge in Patz Case Forced to Justify Secrecy Decisions

News organizations ask New York appellate court to force judge to unseal hearings on evidence and jurors in famous missing child case.

Alberto Nisman and Argentina’s History of Assassinations and Suspicious Suicides

Whether the crusading prosecutor's death is found to be a suicide or homicide, many Argentines probably won't believe it. The past has taught them to always look for the sinister explanation.

February 2015

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