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Video: Shirley Ree Smith in Her Own Words

These videos were produced by PBS' "Frontline."

Shirley Ree Smith, who was convicted of second-degree murder for shaking her 7-week-old grandson to death, speaks to ProPublica's A.C. Thompson. Her conviction was overturned, but then reinstated by the U.S. Supreme Court. Now Smith, 51, faces a possible return to prison. Meanwhile, new doubts out of the Los Angeles County coroner's office raise more questions about her case. | Related story: New Evidence in High Profile Shaken Baby Case

'It's a Good Thing'

Shirley Ree Smith reacts to new doubts from the coroner's office on her conviction. "I wouldn't even be in this predicament if he was here 15 years ago, 16 years ago," she said. "I wouldn't be going through this."

 

'Finally Justice Was Served'

Shirley Ree Smith tells correspondent A.C. Thompson her reaction when the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned her conviction on charges that she killed her grandson by shaking him to death. "They saw the facts and went on the facts, which no one else did," she said.

 

'Free, But Not Really Free'

Fifteen years ago, Shirley Ree Smith was convicted of shaking her grandson to death, but the facts were murky and she always maintained she's innocent. Her conviction was overturned, but then reinstated by the U.S. Supreme Court. She tells FRONTLINE correspondent A.C. Thompson what it's like to live in legal limbo.

This child at 7 weeks probably just had its first barrage of vaccinations.  See this article on how multiple shots in a young child can cause this kind of problem.

http://www.nvic.org/Doctors-Corner/Edward-Yazbak/Multiple-Vaccinations-and-the-Shaken-Baby-Syndrome.aspx

Paula, thank you for this information.  I tweeted it @daehlin

This article is part of an ongoing investigation:
Post Mortem

Post Mortem: Death Investigation in America

A year-long investigation into the nation’s 2,300 coroner and medical examiner offices uncovered a deeply dysfunctional system that quite literally buries its mistakes.

The Story So Far

In TV crime dramas and detective novels, every suspicious death is investigated by a highly trained medical professional, equipped with sophisticated 21st century technology.

The reality in America’s morgues is quite different. ProPublica, in collaboration with PBS “Frontline”  and NPR, took an in-depth look at the nation’s 2,300 coroner and medical examiner offices and found a deeply dysfunctional system that quite literally buries its mistakes.

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