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T. Christian Miller

T. Christian Miller
Read T. Christian Miller's e-book, Firestone and the Warlord, on your Kindle or mobile device.

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T. Christian Miller joined ProPublica in 2008 as a senior reporter based in Washington, D.C. He spent the previous 11 years reporting for the Los Angeles Times. His work included coverage of the 2000 presidential campaign and three years as a bureau chief for the Times, responsible for 10 countries in South and Central America. Earlier in his career he worked for the San Francisco Chronicle and the St. Petersburg Times.


He has received the George Polk Award for Radio Reporting, the Dart Award for Coverage of Trauma, the Selden Ring Award for Investigative Reporting, the Investigative Reporters and Editors award for online reporting, two Overseas Press Club awards, a Livingston Award for Young Journalists, the John B. Oakes Award for Distinguished Environmental Reporting and a certificate of recognition from the Daniel Pearl awards for outstanding international investigative reporting. In addition, Miller was given a yearlong Knight Fellowship in 2011 to study at Stanford University. Miller is the author of Blood Money: Wasted Billions, Lost Lives, and Corporate Greed in Iraq.

Articles (page 4 of 6)

U.N. Responds to Our Story

The United Nations Development Program says it properly handled money spent in the Afghanistan election effort.

U.N. Can’t Account for Millions Sent to Afghan Election Board

Two audits raise questions about the commission carrying out Afghanistan's elections, and about the United Nations' oversight of money sent to ensure a fair vote.

Labor Dept., Congress Plan Improvements to System to Care for Injured War Contractors

Officials are making changes to track the performance of insurers and to speed up the handling of their disputes with injured contractors.

Civilian Contractor Toll in Iraq and Afghanistan Ignored by Defense Dept.

More than 1,600 civilian workers have died in the war zones, but the Pentagon isn't tracking the casualties.

Contractors in Iraq Are Hidden Casualties of War

Reggie Lane, a struggling truck driver, hired on for a good salary with a defense contractor, but a rocket-propelled grenade shattered his life.

Video Skimmer: Ron Boline

Use our video skimmer tool to navigate through the testimony of Ronald Boline, on private contractors in Iraq.

Former Iraq Security Contractors Say Firm Bought Black Market Weapons, Swapped Booze for Rockets

Accusations against another major contractor, Triple Canopy, illustrate the chaos surrounding U.S. security efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Pentagon Study Proposes Overhaul of Defense Base Act to Cover Care for Injured Contractors

Congress could save as much as $250 million a year through a sweeping overhaul of the controversial U.S. system to care for civilian contractors injured in war zones, according to a new Pentagon study.

Congressman Announces Plan to Reform U.S. System to Care for Injured Civilian Contractors

Rep. Elijah Cummings said he hoped his proposal would reduce the $300 million a year paid by defense contractors to insurance companies.

Sometimes It’s Not Your War, But You Sacrifice Anyway

Although low-paid foreign contract workers face many of the same risks soldiers do in Iraq and Afghanistan, they rarely are informed of their rights or even receive the care that has already been purchased by U.S. taxpayers.

Company That Probes War Contractor Injuries for AIG Is Itself Under Scrutiny

The Labor Department is looking into whether a Maltese company misrepresented its employees as agents of the U.S. government.

Dobleng Dusa ang Nakuha sa Pagtatrabaho para sa Amerika

Read a translation in Filipino of the June 19, 2009, story, "Foreign Workers for U.S. Are Casualties Twice Over."

Report Finds Advantages in Gov’t Takeover of Care for Injured Contractors

Citing high insurance premiums paid by the Pentagon, the Congressional Research Service suggests cutting out the middleman.

Contractor Care May Figure in Obama’s Meeting With Filipino President

A senator in Manila presses for proper compensation of those injured or killed while working for the U.S. in war zones.

News Analysis: Broad Agreement That Workers’ Comp Program for War-Zone Workers Needs Fixing

Lawmakers, Obama administration officials, private insurance companies and contractors found common ground in acknowledging there are serious flaws in the government's system for taking care of civilian workers injured or killed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Map: Injuries and Deaths to Civilian Contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan by State

Map: Injuries and Deaths to Civilian Contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan by Country

Foreign Workers for U.S. Are Casualties Twice Over

Contract employees injured in the conflict zones of Iraq and Afghanistan and families of those killed there are covered by American taxpayer-funded insurance, but it often fails to deliver.

The Story So Far: Civilian Contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan

In One Filipino Town, Workers Injured in Iraq Depend on the Kindness of AIG

Three men from the Filipino town of Lutopan served as part of the invisible army that daily cares for and feeds U.S. soldiers in Iraq. But when one died and the other two were injured, their treatment was far from uniform.
T. Christian Miller
Read T. Christian Miller's e-book, Firestone and the Warlord, on your Kindle or mobile device.

Contact Info

Get Updates

Stay on top of what we’re working on by subscribing to our email digest.

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