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Chart: Has Your State Left Federal Unemployment Money Unclaimed?

Chart: Has Your State Left Federal Unemployment Money Unclaimed?

by Olga Pierce, ProPublica -- July 2, 2009

As we detailed in our series with public radio's Marketplace, the U.S.'s patchwork unemployment insurance system -- each state has their own program -- features wildly varying levels of financing and benefits. The percent of unemployed workers collecting benefits also varies, from 22 percent in Washington, D.C., to 77 percent in Idaho.

The stimulus bill, passed in February, includes $7 billion for states that expand their unemployment insurance to include new groups of workers, including part-time and low-income workers. States have until 2011 to take advantage of the funding -- and some are in the process of passing legislation to do that -- but so far 29 states have not expanded their benefits enough claim their full share of the funds. Read the full story here.

Has your state left funding unclaimed?

      Accepted all of funding
      Accepted part of funding
      Has not accepted funding
State Funding Available Amount Claimed Qualifying Modernization Policies*
Alabama $100.5 million$0None
Alaska $15.6 million $5.2 millionAlready had dependant allowance and spouse relocation, added alternative base period
Arizona $150.1 million$0Already covered workers who leave their jobs for compelling family reasons
Arkansas $60.0 million$60.0 millionAdopted alternative base period, added coverage for part-time workers and those who leave their jobs for compelling family reasons
California $838.7 million$838.7 millionAdopted alternative base period (effective 2011), already covered part-time workers , those in job training and those who leave their jobs for compelling family reasons
Colorado $127.5 million$127.5 millionAdopted alternative base period, added coverage for workers in job training and those who leave their jobs for compelling family reasons
Connecticut $87.8 million$87.8 millionAlready used the alternative base period, and offered a dependent allowance, added coverage for workers who leave their jobs for compelling family reasons
Delaware $21.9 million$0Already covered part-time workers and those who leave their jobs because of domestic violence
District of Columbia $27.6 million$9.2 millionAlready used the alternative base period, covered part-time workers and those who leave their jobs because of domestic violence
Florida $444.3 million$0None
Georgia $220.3 million$220.3 millionAlready used the alternative base period, added coverage for part-time workers and those in job training
Hawaii $30.5 million$30.5 millionAlready used the alternative base period, amended coverage for part-time workers and and those who leave their jobs for compelling family reasons
Idaho $32.3 million$32.3 millionAdopted the alternative base period, added coverage for part-time workers and those in job training
Illinois $301.2 million$301.2 millionAlready used the alternative base period, increased the dependent allowance and amended coverage for workers who leave their jobs for compelling family reasons
Indiana $148.5 million$0Already covered workers who leave their jobs because of domestic violence or a spouse relocates
Iowa $70.8 million$70.8 millionAdopted the alternative base period, amended coverage for part-time workers and added coverage for those in job training
Kansas $69.0 million$69.0 millionAdopted the alternative base period, added coverage for part-time workers and those in job training, already offered coverage for workers who leave their job because of domestic violence or when a spouse relocates
Kentucky $90.2 million$0None
Louisiana $98.4 million$0Already covered part-time workers
Maine $28.2 million$28.2 millionAlready used alternative base period, covered part-time workers, amended coverage for workers in job training and those who leave their jobs for a compelling family reason
Maryland $126.8 million$0Added coverage for part-time workers, already covered workers who leave their jobs because of an illness or disability in the family
Massachusetts $162.7 million$54.2 millionAlready used the alternative base period, offered a dependent allowance and covered workers who leave their jobs because of domestic violence
Michigan $208.3 million$69.4 millionAlready used alternative base period
Minnesota $130.1 million$130.1 millionAmended alternative base period, added coverage for part-time workers and those who leave their jobs for a compelling family reason
Mississippi $56.1 million$0None
Missouri $133.3 million$0None
Montana $19.5 million$19.5 millionAlready covered workers who leave their jobs because of domestic violence, adopted the alternative base period, coverage for part-time workers and those in job training
Nebraska $43.6 million$0Already covered part-time workers and those who leave their jobs for a compelling family reason
Nevada $76.9 million$76.6 millionAdopted the alternative base period, already covered part-time workers and those who leave their jobs for a compelling family reason
New Hampshire $31.4 million$31.4 millionAlready used the alternative base period, covered part-time workers, added coverage for those who leave their jobs for a compelling family reason
New Jersey $206.8 million$206.8 millionAlready used alternative base period, covered part-time workers, amended coverage for workers in job training
New Mexico $39.0 million$13.0 millionAlready used the alternative base period, offered a dependent allowance, covered part-time workers and those who leave their jobs because of domestic violence
New York $412.7 million$412.7 millionAlready used the alternative base period, amended coverage for part-time workers and those who leave their jobs for a compelling family reason
North Carolina $205.1 million$68.4 millionAlready used the alternative base period, covered part-time workers and those who leave their jobs for a compelling family reason
North Dakota $14.6 million$0None
Ohio $264.5 million$88.2 millionAlready used the alternative base period
Oklahoma $75.9 million$75.9 millionAmended alternative base period, added coverage for part-time workers and those who leave their jobs for a compelling family reason
Oregon $85.6 million$85.6 millionAdopted the alternative base period, amended coverage for workers in job training and amended coverage for those who leave their jobs for a compelling family reason
Pennsylvania $273.3 million$0Already covered part-time workers and those who leave their jobs because a spouse relocates
Rhode Island $23.5 million$7.8 millionAlready used the alternative base period and covered workers who leave their jobs for a compelling family reason
South Carolina $97.5 million$0Already offered coverage to workers who leave their jobs because of domestic violence
South Dakota $17.6 million$5.9 millionAdopted the alternative base period, already covered part-time workers and those who leave their jobs because of domestic violence
Tennessee $141.8 million$141.8 millionAdopted the alternative base period, added dependent allowance and coverage for part-time workers
Texas $555.7 million$0Already covered workers who leave their jobs for compelling family reasons
Utah $61.0 million$0None
Vermont $13.9 million$13.9 millionAlready used alternative base period, covered part-time workers and those who leave their jobs because of domestic violence, added coverage for workers in job training
Virginia $188.5 million$62.8 millionAlready used alternative base period
Washington $146.6 million$48.9 millionAlready used alternative base period, covered workers who leave their jobs for compelling family reasons, added coverage for workers who leave their jobs when a spouse relocates
West Virginia $33.2 million$11.0 millionAdopted alternative base period
Wisconsin $133.9 million$133.9 millionAlready used the alternative base period, added coverage for workers in job training, amended coverage for workers who leave their jobs for a compelling family reason
Wyoming $14.2 million$0Already covered part-time workers, those who leave their jobs because of domestic violence

*Current as of June 16

Source: Department of Labor and National Employment Law Project