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The Trade

A Rogue to the Rescue: UBS Scandal Reinforces Need for Strict Volcker Rule

As a draft of the Volcker rule has made the rounds in the last several weeks, it has alternatively caused fits of despair and cries of exultation. And that’s just among the proponents of the regulation.

Tackling Reams of Bank Data Can Take Diligence, and Trust

Since emerging as one of the country’s largest banks, Wells Fargo has continued to let its numbers speak for themselves. That may not be such a good thing.

Bank of America Gets Buffetted

Warren Buffett’s $5 billion investment in B of A is hardly a confidence booster.

In U.S. Stress Tests, a Tool to Gauge Contagion in Europe

Once Unthinkable, Breakup of Big Banks Now Seems Feasible

What was made can be unmade.

JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo may have venerable names, but they and the pseudo-venerable Citigroup and Bank of America are all products of countless mergers and agglomerations.

There is no rule of markets that requires a financial system dominated by four cobbled-together, lumbering behemoths.

In U.S. Monetary Policy, a Boon to Banks

The federal government, in ways explicit and implicit, profoundly subsidizes and shelters the banking industry, and the protection is so well established that we barely notice it anymore.

Misdirection in Goldman Sachs’s Housing Short

For One Whistle-Blower, No Good Deed Goes Unpunished

It has been noted repeatedly that almost no top bankers have faced serious consequences for their actions in the financial crisis. But there is a Wall Street corollary that might be even more pernicious: good guys are punished.

Jesse Eisinger

About The Trade

In this column, co-published with New York Times' DealBook, I monitor the financial markets to hold companies, executives and government officials accountable for their actions. Tips? Praise? Contact me at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)