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Photos: Baltimore in the Wake of Freddie Gray

In the tumult following Freddie Gray's death, a young photographer documented life in a city under siege.
FDA Examines Whether MRI Drugs Accumulate in Brain Tissue
Senator to Red Cross: Where’s the Transparency on Haiti?
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Editor’s Note: ‘Dr. Abscess’ and Why Surgeon Scorecard Matters

Critics claim our analysis of surgical complications is flawed. We disagree. For the first time, patients can see a surgeon’s record – and use it to help make their best choice.

Judges Revive Claim that AT&T Overcharged Schools for Internet Service

A lawsuit can proceed against the company for allegedly failing to offer the required discounts to schools and libraries, says an appeals court.

When It Comes to Patient Safety, There’s A Problem. ProPublica’s Patient Safety Chat Recap

On Friday at 11 a.m. EST, spinal surgeon Dr. Charles Mick and the ProPublica reporters on #SurgeonScorecard will take your questions about patient safety.

Road Hazard: How the ‘Embarrassing’ Gas Tax Impasse Explains Washington

The main federal fund for roads and bridges runs at a deep deficit. If even red states can raise the gas tax, why can’t Congress?

Confidential Documents: Red Cross Itself May Not Know How Millions Donated for Haiti Were Spent

The documents also raise questions about the accuracy of the Red Cross’ count of how many Haitians it helped, concluding the figures on one project were “fairly meaningless.”

We Go Behind the Scenes on Surgeon Scorecard

Podcast: The ProPublicans behind Surgeon Scorecard talk about melding data and traditional reporting.

At Breakfast to Talk El Chapo, Drug War Veterans Serve Up Cynicism

Over eggs at a San Antonio café, a reporter listens as former law enforcement officials and one ex-drug cartel operative swap theories about El Chapo’s latest escape and what it says about the U.S. and Mexico.

The Military Built Another Multimillion-Dollar Building in Afghanistan That No One Used

In its latest report, the inspector general found that the U.S. military continued to build a $14.7 million warehouse after it knew it wasn’t needed, echoing an earlier investigation into an unused $25 million HQ.

Agent Orange Act Was Supposed to Help Vietnam Veterans — But Many Still Don’t Qualify

The 1991 law presumes veterans were exposed to the defoliant if they have certain diseases and “set foot” in Vietnam, but Navy vets and Air Force vets in Thailand say they were also exposed. Here’s our guide to groups seeking Agent Orange benefits.

For a Surgeon With a History of Complications, a Felony Past

As a medical student, Florida spine surgeon Constantine Toumbis stabbed a friend outside a bar. Documents show he omitted or misrepresented his record in regulatory filings.

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Major Projects

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Less Than Zero

Less Than Zero

Despite decades of accepted science, California and Arizona are still miscounting their water supplies.

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Editor’s Note: ‘Dr. Abscess’ and Why Surgeon Scorecard Matters

Editor’s Note: ‘Dr. Abscess’ and Why Surgeon Scorecard Matters

Critics claim our analysis of surgical complications is flawed. We disagree. For the first time, patients can see a surgeon’s record – and use it to help make their best choice.

See entire series

Insult to Injury

Driven by big business and insurers, states nationwide are dismantling workers’ compensation, slashing benefits to injured workers and making it more difficult for them to get care. Meanwhile employers are paying the lowest rates for workers’ comp insurance since the 1970s.

13 Stories in the Series. Latest:

Injured Worker in ProPublica/NPR Story Testifies Before Illinois Legislature

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Senator to Red Cross: Where’s the Transparency on Haiti?

Senator to Red Cross: Where’s the Transparency on Haiti?

“I still have a lot more questions for the Red Cross,” said Sen. Charles Grassley.

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Level 14

How a home for troubled children came undone and what it means for California’s chance at reform.

9 Stories in the Series. Latest:

In Rare Step, Workers at California Group Home Unionize

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Unforgiven

The way lenders and collectors pursue consumer debt has undergone an aggressive transformation in America. Collectors today don’t give up easy, often pursuing debts for years. It’s now routine for companies to sue debtors, then seize their wages or the cash in their bank accounts. For many people, these changes have profoundly affected their lives.

13 Stories in the Series. Latest:

Senator to Hospitals: Stop Suing Poor Patients

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