ProPublica

Journalism in the Public Interest

Median Income Is Down, But Public College Tuition Is Way Up

From 2000 to 2014, the average cost of in-state tuition and fees for public colleges in America rose 80 percent. During that same time period, the median American household income dropped by 7 percent.
A Spike in Rates of Pregnancy-related Deaths in Texas Spurs Soul-searching
Drug and Device Makers Pay Thousands of Docs with Disciplinary Records

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Uncovering a $1 Billion Deal to Detain Unauthorized Immigrants

Podcast: Chico Harlan discusses his investigation into private immigrant detention centers.

Wal-Mart Has a Serious Crime Problem: MuckReads Weekly

Some of the best #MuckReads we read this week. Want to receive these by email? Sign up to get this briefing delivered to your inbox every weekend.

Aging But Not Aged Olympians

You can listen to what Olympic commentators say about the rapid aging of athletes, just don’t believe it all.

Dozens of New York Officials Support Tenants’ Lawsuit Over Rent Stabilization

Tenants have sued a Lower Manhattan developer, saying their leases should have been rent-stabilized in exchange for the tax breaks their landlord received. State and local officials have now filed a brief supporting the tenants, whose case could affect thousands of rental units.

Why Are We Still Wasting Billions on Homeland Security Projects That Don’t Make Us Safer?

An article in The Atlantic on post-9/11 America makes a powerful case that the “never again” approach to homeland security is good politics but lousy policy.

New Jersey Legislators Move to Reform Aggressive Student Loan Program

The move is the latest action to rein in the agency, whose loans have left families financially ruined.

Videos Surface of a Death in Custody the LAPD Didn’t Want Released

Vachel Howard was arrested for driving under the influence. Hours later, he was dead. Here‘s what happened inside an LAPD jail.

A Good Cop

John Timoney, beat cop with a master’s degree, led police departments in New York, Philadelphia and Miami.

Gimme a Break! IRS Tax Loophole Can Reward Excessive Water Use in Drought-stricken West

Experts fear tax deductions for water use as a “depleted asset” could actually worsen the crisis as rivers and reservoirs dry up.

Company That Sued Soldiers Settles Colorado Lawsuit

The Virginia-based company was the focus of a 2014 ProPublica investigation of its lending and collection practices.

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Major Projects

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Busted

Tens of thousands of people every year are sent to jail based on the results of a $2 roadside drug test. Widespread evidence shows that these tests routinely produce false positives. Why are police departments and prosecutors still using them?

3 Stories in the Series. Latest:

‘No Field Test is Fail Safe’: Meet the Chemist Behind Houston’s Police Drug Kits

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Red Cross

How one of the country’s most venerated charities has failed disaster victims, broken promises and made dubious claims of success.

36 Stories in the Series. Latest:

I Spent My Summer Tracking Down Government Records About the Red Cross

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Machine Bias

We’re investigating algorithmic injustice and the formulas that increasingly influence our lives.

12 Stories in the Series. Latest:

Making Algorithms Accountable

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As ISIS Brewed in Iraq, Clinton’s State Department Cut Eyes and Ears on the Ground

As ISIS Brewed in Iraq, Clinton’s State Department Cut Eyes and Ears on the Ground

An investigation by ProPublica and The Washington Post finds that Secretary of State Clinton initially pressed to keep civilian programs and listening posts after the U.S. troop pullout in 2011, but then her State Department scrapped or slashed them at the behest of the White House and Congress.

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An Unbelievable Story of Rape

An 18-year-old said she was attacked at knifepoint. Then she said she made it up. That’s where our story begins.

6 Stories in the Series. Latest:

Listen to Our Collaboration with ‘This American Life’

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Gimme a Break! IRS Tax Loophole Can Reward Excessive Water Use in Drought-stricken West

Gimme a Break! IRS Tax Loophole Can Reward Excessive Water Use in Drought-stricken West

Experts fear tax deductions for water use as a “depleted asset” could actually worsen the crisis as rivers and reservoirs dry up.

See entire series

Hell and High Water

Houston is the fourth-largest city in the country. It’s home to the nation’s largest refining and petrochemical complex, where billions of gallons of oil and dangerous chemicals are stored. And it’s a sitting duck for the next big hurricane. Why isn’t Texas ready?

6 Stories in the Series. Latest:

U.S. Rep. Weber Says He’ll Work on Bill to Speed Hurricane Protection Plan

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Reliving Agent Orange

ProPublica and The Virginian-Pilot are exploring the effects of the chemical mixture Agent Orange on Vietnam veterans and their families, as well as their fight for benefits.

15 Stories in the Series. Latest:

VA Officials Pledge New Studies Into Effects of Agent Orange

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