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Here Are the Financial Disclosures of Officials Trump Has Installed Across the Government

The financial disclosures come from White House staffers, President Trump’s Cabinet and hundreds of members of so-called beachhead teams that the administration has quietly hired at federal agencies.

Paul Ryan Says ‘Death Tax’ Hurts Wisconsin Small Businesses. IRS Data Shows Otherwise.

As they push to abolish the estate tax, the House Speaker and President Trump may be exaggerating its harm to small businesses and family farms.

Trump’s Not the Only One Blocking Constituents on Twitter

As elected officials increasingly turn to social media to communicate with constituents, some are blocking those who disagree with them. Some say it violates the First Amendment. Legislators say it’s about promoting a “healthy, civil dialogue.” Expect court battles ahead.

A Federal Regulator Is Probing Wells Fargo’s Mortgage Practices

A consumer watchdog agency is following up on ProPublica’s reports that the scandal-ridden bank improperly charged fees to customers from Los Angeles to Oregon. Meanwhile, the bank is conducting its own inquiry.

For Climate Cause, Trump’s Withdrawal from Paris Accord Just One Hurdle Among Many

Economic forces at work beyond the reach of the global climate agreement present their own enduring challenges.

Voucher Program Helps Well-Off Vermonters Pay for Prep School at Public Expense

Regardless of their income, residents of small Vermont towns can use state vouchers to send their children to boarding schools and ski academies. Some school-choice advocates want to replicate the program nationwide.

He Was About To Pick Up His Newborn Son After Surgery When He Was Arrested By ICE

The case of Oscar Millan shows ICE’s renewed focus on strict immigration enforcement. Under the Obama administration, agents had discretion in cases of immigrants with gravely sick children.

Nevada Passes Modest Measures to Curb Prosecutorial Misconduct

Lobbying by prosecutors and police guts law that would have punished prosecutors who didn’t share evidence with defense. Debate cited case of Fred Steese, subject of ProPublica and Vanity Fair story.

Meet the ProPublica Data Institute Class of 2017

We’re thrilled to announce the 12 outstanding journalists who will be joining us this year.

Tom Price Bought Drug Stocks. Then He Pushed Pharma’s Agenda in Australia.

Before he was named Trump’s health secretary, Price took a congressional trip to Australia and pressed officials to extend protections for drug companies in an international trade agreement.

Have You Had Difficulty Paying For or Accessing Prescription Drugs? We Want to Hear From You.

Have you had difficulty paying for or accessing prescription drugs? We want to hear from you.

A Drug Quintupled in Price. Now, Drug Industry Players Are Feuding Over the Windfall.

Amid public concern over spiking drug prices, a powerful middleman is suing a tiny drugmaker over unpaid rebates and fees. The maker calls the suit baseless; analysts say the suit offers a window into an opaque world.

A Few Things Got Left Out of The Daily Caller’s Report on Confederate Monument Rally

A reporter for the conservative news site neglected to mention he’d given a speech in front of protesters in support of white nationalism.

Doctor’s Records in U.S. Doping Investigation Don’t Match Patients’ Copies

Houston endocrinologist Jeffrey Brown was also part of a 2015 investigation by ProPublica and the BBC of the Nike Oregon Project and coach Alberto Salazar.

Announcing ProPublica’s 12 Diversity Scholarship Recipients

These 12 talented journalists will get $500 each to attend NAHJ, NABJ, AAJA or NAJA.

Kafka in Vegas

Fred Steese served more than 20 years in prison for the murder of a Vegas showman even though evidence in the prosecution’s files proved he didn’t do it. But when the truth came to light, he was offered a confounding deal known as an Alford plea. If he took it he could go free, but he’d remain a con

Vegas Judge Had Long History of Prosecutorial Misconduct

The behavior of Bill Kephart, who led the murder prosecution of Fred Steese, was repeatedly lambasted by the Supreme Court of Nevada. But that didn’t stop him from becoming a judge. This month he was charged with misconduct in that position too.

Prosecutors Race to Keep Notorious Angel-of-Death Behind Bars

Texas is scheduled to release Genene Jones, a former nurse and suspected serial killer of children, early next year. Today, prosecutors in San Antonio moved to prevent her release, bringing a new murder charge against Jones in connection with the death of a child 35 years ago.

Three Strategies to Defend GOP Health Bill: Euphemisms, False Statements and Deleted Comments

Since the passage of the American Health Care Act, Republican members of Congress have tried to swing public opinion to their side. ProPublica has been tracking what they’re saying.

In a Lonely Corner of Coney Island, a Fight Over Care for the Vulnerable

Life at Oceanview Manor Home for Adults is at the center of the latest court battle involving the New York State Department of Health.

July 2017

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