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Victims in Thousands of Potential Hate Crimes Never Notify Police

A new federal survey on hate crimes offers cause for both alarm and confusion.

Former Texas Nurse Convicted of Baby-Killing Told Authorities ‘I Was Heinous.’

In a letter from prison, Genene Jones appeared to acknowledge her guilt and asked Texas nursing regulators to forgive her for a crime she committed when she was not “of sound mind.”

Medicare Halts Release of Much-Anticipated Data

The government had planned to share data with researchers on patients enrolled in Medicare Advantage health plans. Then, suddenly, it didn’t.

Facebook’s Secret Censorship Rules Protect White Men From Hate Speech But Not Black Children

A trove of internal documents sheds light on the algorithms that Facebook’s censors use to differentiate between hate speech and legitimate political expression.

Is Trump Administration’s Visa Push a Way to Win Health Care Votes?

In directing staffers at the Departments of Labor and Homeland Security to draft a rule increasing the number of guest-worker visas, senior political officials specifically highlighted businesses in Maine and Alaska, home to senators who hold crucial health care votes.

Democratic Senators Condemn Betsy DeVos’ Record on Civil Rights

More than 30 “disappointed and alarmed” senators penned a letter chastising civil rights enforcement at the Department of Education.

The Last Shot

Amid a surging opiate crisis, the maker of the anti-addiction drug Vivitrol skirted the usual sales channels. It found a captive market for its once-a-month injection in the criminal justice system.

The ‘International Man of Mystery’ Linked to Flynn’s Lobbying Deal

Dmitri “David” Zaikin made Russian energy deals with powerful officials, advised Eastern European parties drifting toward Russia, brokered condos at Toronto’s Trump Tower, and teamed up with the guy who hired Michael Flynn.

Supreme Court Won’t Take Up R.J. Reynolds Age Discrimination Case

The decision in a case involving the nation’s second-largest tobacco company gives employers new ways to shield themselves from charges of bias against older applicants.

Despite Exposés and Embarrassments, Hundreds of Judges Preside in New York Without Law Degrees

A review of the work of the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct chronicles the costs of a tradition resistant to change.

Nursing Home Workers Still Posting Nude and Vulgar Photos of Residents on Snapchat

Federal and state officials have increased their focus on the problem, but ProPublica found 18 incidents in the last year in which employees at nursing homes and assisted living facilities posted unauthorized photos and videos of residents on social media platforms.

Inappropriate Social Media Posts by Nursing Home Workers, Detailed

Here are details of 65 incidents since 2012 in which workers at nursing homes and assisted-living centers shared photos or videos of residents on social media networks. The details come from government inspection reports, court cases and media reports.

Many ‘Rent-Stabilized’ NYC Apartments Are Not Really Stabilized. See Where They Are.

The units are supposed to be protected from steep rent hikes. But thanks to a loophole, owners can seek big rent increases anyway. Our analysis shows some of the city’s poorest areas are most at risk.

Preferential Rents in NYC

Newly released data shows ZIP codes where rents could suddenly jump for rent-stabilized apartments.

More Than 100 Federal Agencies Fail to Report Hate Crimes to the FBI’s National Database

The gaps in data damage efforts to understand the nature and scope of violence driven by racial and religious hatred.

Suspected Texas Serial Killer Charged With Death of Second Baby

Decades after prosecutors convicted Genene Jones of killing a single infant, a Texas grand jury has indicted the former nurse on a second new charge of murder. Prosecutors hope to prevent Jones’ release from prison, which is scheduled for next year.

How Two Common Medications Became One $455 Million Specialty Pill

After I was prescribed a brand-name drug I didn’t need and given a coupon to cover the out-of-pocket costs, I discovered another reason Americans pay too much for health care.

In Flint Water Crisis, Could Involuntary Manslaughter Charges Actually Lead to Prison Time?

Prosecutors will try to prove five Michigan officials were responsible for a Legionnaires’ death because they knew about the problem, but failed to warn the public. Similar cases of environmental disasters have not resulted in convictions, but there are reasons Flint could break the mold.

¿Quién exige responsabilidades a la DEA cuando sus misiones cuestan vidas?

En 2011, un operativo de la DEA dio origen a una masacre en un pueblo mexicano, pero la agencia nunca investigó qué salió mal.

Who Holds the DEA Accountable When Its Missions Cost Lives?

In 2011, a DEA operation touched off a massacre in a Mexican town, yet the agency never investigated what went wrong.

August 2017

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