ProPublica

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Russia’s Shadow-War in a Wary Europe

Fears of Russian meddling in a French vote reflect an overt and covert influence campaign.

Crime Lab Scandal Forces Prosecutors to Disavow Thousands of Drug Convictions

A final ruling by Massachusetts Supreme Court would erase convictions but not undo the harm caused by a corrupt state chemist.

New Jersey Seeks to Sanction Psychologist for Disclosing Patients’ Diagnoses in Court Filings

Lawsuits filed on behalf of a psychologist and his practice had disclosed details of patients’ mental health diagnoses and treatments, including those of children. Psychologist Barry Helfmann denies wrongdoing.

Secret Hospital Inspections May Become Public at Last

The federal government has proposed requiring that accreditors release reports on the problems they find during hospital inspections. Right now, the reports are secret.

California Group Home Liable for Millions in Case of Abused Boy

A jury hit FamiliesFirst, one of California’s largest mental health care providers, for neglect and fraud.

Trump is Hiring Lobbyists and Top Ethics Official Says ‘There’s No Transparency’

In one case, an official working on energy regulation recently lobbied for oil and coal companies — but the White House won't say whether he received an ethics waiver.

DeVos Pick to Head Civil Rights Office Once Said She Faced Discrimination for Being White

Candice Jackson’s intellectual journey raises questions about how actively she will investigate allegations of unfair treatment of minorities and women.

Another Startling Verdict for Forensic Science

A recent study on the reliability of hair analysis is only latest to shake public confidence.

Trump’s Wall: How Much Money Does the Government Have For It Now?

$20 million. That’s enough to cover the cost of seven miles of wall.

For-Profit School Chain Camelot Suffers Setback Following Abuse Allegations

After our reporting on alleged physical abuse of students at alternative schools run by Camelot Education, a Georgia school district delayed awarding a $6.4 million contract to the company.

The Trump Administration Lost Again in Court, This Time on Voter ID

A federal judge ruled that Texas’ voter ID was intended to discriminate against blacks and Latinos. The Department of Justice tried to argue otherwise.

ProPublica, New York Daily News Win Pulitzer Gold Medal

The news organizations won journalism’s highest honor for their joint investigation on abuses in NYPD enforcement of the city’s nuisance abatement law.

Official Involved in Bush-Era Purge of Gay Employees Now in Trump Administration

A government investigation found that Jim Renne was a key player in a scandal in which staff were targeted on the basis of sexual orientation.

Hate Crime Law Results in Few Convictions and Lots of Disappointment

In Texas, the tiny number of successful prosecutions leave both victims and lawmakers questioning state's commitment to punishing hate.

The White House Still Hasn’t Released Most Staffers’ Financial Disclosures

A week ago, the White House began releasing the Trump administration’s financial disclosures. But many are still missing. Here’s what we know now.

The Car Insurance Industry Attacks Our Story. Here’s Our Response.

An industry representative disputed our findings that many disparities in auto insurance prices between minority and white neighborhoods are wider than differences in risk can explain. His analysis is flawed.

U.S. Immigration Agency Will Lose Millions Because It Can’t Process Visas Fast Enough

Fees from so-called “premium processing” to expedite H-1B visas have paid for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ efforts to digitize. But the agency hasn’t been able to keep up with demand, forcing it to suspend its cash cow.

Federal Judge Sees New York State Conspiracy to Thwart Care for Mentally Ill

The judge who oversaw landmark case involving troubled homes for the mentally ill sends word to Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Attorney General Eric Schneiderman that state’s efforts to undermine care must end.

Minority Neighborhoods Pay Higher Car Insurance Premiums Than White Areas With the Same Risk

Our analysis of premiums and payouts in California, Illinois, Texas and Missouri shows that some major insurers charge minority neighborhoods as much as 30 percent more than other areas with similar accident costs.

Chicago Area Disparities in Car Insurance Premiums

Some car insurers charge higher premiums in Chicago’s minority neighborhoods than in predominantly white neighborhoods with similar risk of accidents.

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