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Busted

Tens of thousands of people every year are sent to jail based on the results of a $2 roadside drug test. Widespread evidence shows that these tests routinely produce false positives. Why are police departments and prosecutors still using them?

System Failures

Houston cases shed light on a disturbing possibility: that wrongful convictions are most often not isolated acts of misconduct by the authorities but systemic breakdowns — among judges and prosecutors, defense lawyers and crime labs.

Senate Bill Would Force Red Cross to Open Books to Outside Oversight

Following reporting by ProPublica and NPR and an investigation by his staff, Sen. Charles Grassley introduces the American Red Cross Transparency Act.

New York Isn’t Telling Tenants They May Be Protected From Big Rent Hikes

Due to an error by state officials, rent limits on tens of thousands of New York City apartments were improperly removed. Now, 20 years later, the state is relying on landlords to fix that problem. What could go wrong?

Meet the NYC Tax Break That Could Save You From Eviction Or A Big Rent Hike

A property tax benefit known as J-51 can mean the difference between a rent freeze and a sharp increase. Here is how to find out if your building qualifies.

From Captive to Captor: A Journalist’s Journey from Prisoner to Prison Guard

Podcast: Mother Jones reporter Shane Bauer goes undercover as a prison guard in Louisiana and finds a dark truth within himself.

New Jersey’s Student Loan Program is ‘State-Sanctioned Loan-Sharking’

The loans have extraordinarily stringent rules, aggressive collections and few reprieves, even for borrowers who’ve died. The head of the loan agency was appointed by Gov. Chris Christie.

VA Officials Pledge New Studies Into Effects of Agent Orange

“These individuals deserve an answer,” a top VA official said at a forum hosted by ProPublica and The Virginian-Pilot to address the possible multi-generational impacts of the herbicide.

Toxic Ash, Trillions in Student Debt and More in MuckReads Weekly

Some of the best #MuckReads we read this week. Want to receive these by email? Sign up to get this briefing delivered to your inbox every weekend.

SRSLY: BoJo, The #Brexit Bro

Your three-minute read on the best reporting you probably missed.

Trump Taps Consultant Accused of Defrauding PAC to Lead Colorado Campaign

Patrick Davis has denied allegations that he inappropriately steered hundreds of thousands of dollars raised by a conservative PAC to organizations linked to himself and his friends. Now he’ll lead Trump’s campaign in a key swing state.

Are Copay Coupons Actually Making Drugs More Expensive?

Consumers, including a ProPublica reporter, love saving money using drug copay coupons. But by upending the benefit structure of health insurers, these clever marketing tools may be increasing costs for everyone.

Drug and Device Makers Find Receptive Audience at For-profit, Southern Hospitals

A ProPublica analysis shows that where a hospital is located and who owns it make a big difference in what share of its doctors take industry payments.

How We Compiled the Dollars for Docs Hospital Data

Our goal was to compare U.S. hospitals based on the percentage of their affiliated physicians who receive payments of various sizes from pharmaceutical and medical device companies.

What Percentage of Doctors at Your Hospital Take Drug, Device Payments?

Where a hospital is located makes a big difference in how many of its doctors take payments from drug and medical device companies. See how your state compares and look up your hospital.

Game Changer: The Best Analysis of the Supreme Court’s Abortion Decision

After the court hands a sweeping victory to abortion rights advocates, there was a torrent of analysis on what it means and what comes next.

The Dig: Investigating the Safety of the Water You Drink

The government has information about your drinking water. It isn’t always accurate.

In Texas Decision, Supreme Court Delivers Sweeping Win for Abortion Rights

The ruling is expected to have a monumental ripple effect, invalidating strict clinic laws in about half the states.

Why Liberal New York City’s Schools Are Among the Nation’s Most Segregated

Podcast: Former ProPublica reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones talks about her New York Times Magazine story on sending her daughter to a segregated school.

Federal Committee Votes to Terminate Troubled College Accreditor

An Education Department advisory committee took the unprecedented step of calling on the government to revoke powers of for-profit college accreditor.

August 2016

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