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America’s Other Drug Problem

Every year nursing homes nationwide flush, burn or throw out tons of valuable prescription drugs. Iowa collects them and gives them to needy patients for free. Most other states don’t.

Trump Is Finally Almost Done Resigning From His Businesses

President Trump has nearly finished handing over management of his businesses — nearly 100 days after he promised to do so.

Lawmakers Seek Stronger Monitoring of Racial Disparities in Car Insurance Premiums

In response to our report that minority neighborhoods pay higher premiums than white areas with the same risk, six members of Congress and two Illinois state senators are pushing for closer scrutiny of insurance practices.

New York Landlords Exploit Loophole to Hike Rents Despite Freeze

Thanks to a 2003 state law, owners of rent-stabilized apartments can arbitrarily boost rents to a legal maximum that they set themselves. The tactic fosters gentrification, eviction and homelessness.

We’re Investigating Hate Across the U.S. There’s No Shortage of Work.

The coalition of newsrooms behind “Documenting Hate” has recorded a wide variety of violence in all corners of the country.

Remember Those Temporary Officials Trump Quietly Installed? Some Are Now Permanent Employees.

In January, the Trump administration quietly dispatched more than 400 temporary employees across the federal government. Now dozens of them are getting permanent jobs.

Russia’s Shadow-War in a Wary Europe

Fears of Russian meddling in a French vote reflect an overt and covert influence campaign.

Crime Lab Scandal Forces Prosecutors to Disavow Thousands of Drug Convictions

A final ruling by Massachusetts Supreme Court would erase convictions but not undo the harm caused by a corrupt state chemist.

New Jersey Seeks to Sanction Psychologist for Disclosing Patients’ Diagnoses in Court Filings

Lawsuits filed on behalf of a psychologist and his practice had disclosed details of patients’ mental health diagnoses and treatments, including those of children. Psychologist Barry Helfmann denies wrongdoing.

Secret Hospital Inspections May Become Public at Last

The federal government has proposed requiring that accreditors release reports on the problems they find during hospital inspections. Right now, the reports are secret.

California Group Home Liable for Millions in Case of Abused Boy

A jury hit FamiliesFirst, one of California’s largest mental health care providers, for neglect and fraud.

Trump is Hiring Lobbyists and Top Ethics Official Says ‘There’s No Transparency’

In one case, an official working on energy regulation recently lobbied for oil and coal companies — but the White House won't say whether he received an ethics waiver.

DeVos Pick to Head Civil Rights Office Once Said She Faced Discrimination for Being White

Candice Jackson’s intellectual journey raises questions about how actively she will investigate allegations of unfair treatment of minorities and women.

Another Startling Verdict for Forensic Science

A recent study on the reliability of hair analysis is only latest to shake public confidence.

Trump’s Wall: How Much Money Does the Government Have For It Now?

$20 million. That’s enough to cover the cost of seven miles of wall.

For-Profit School Chain Camelot Suffers Setback Following Abuse Allegations

After our reporting on alleged physical abuse of students at alternative schools run by Camelot Education, a Georgia school district delayed awarding a $6.4 million contract to the company.

The Trump Administration Lost Again in Court, This Time on Voter ID

A federal judge ruled that Texas’ voter ID was intended to discriminate against blacks and Latinos. The Department of Justice tried to argue otherwise.

ProPublica, New York Daily News Win Pulitzer Gold Medal

The news organizations won journalism’s highest honor for their joint investigation on abuses in NYPD enforcement of the city’s nuisance abatement law.

Official Involved in Bush-Era Purge of Gay Employees Now in Trump Administration

A government investigation found that Jim Renne was a key player in a scandal in which staff were targeted on the basis of sexual orientation.

Hate Crime Law Results in Few Convictions and Lots of Disappointment

In Texas, the tiny number of successful prosecutions leave both victims and lawmakers questioning state's commitment to punishing hate.

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