Haru Coryne

Data Reporter

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Haru Coryne is a data reporter for ProPublica, based in Chicago. He uses a combination of statistical methods, computer software and document-based research to find stories in large troves of information. A former real estate reporter for The Real Deal, he is especially interested in housing, business and economic development.

The State Took His Kids Three Times. And Three Times It Gave Them Back.

In Southern Illinois, many families suspected of neglect cycle through the child welfare system. Too often they don’t get the help they need.

What ProPublica Is Doing About Diversity in 2022

Here is our annual report on the breakdown of our staff and how we’re working to create a more diverse news organization and inclusive journalism community.

Chicago’s Last Black-Owned Bank Got Millions in Government Deposits — Then Had to Give Them Back

As Black-owned banks disappear, politicians are under increasing pressure to save them. Big deposits are a ready solution, but sometimes they burden the banks more than they help.

What’s Gone Wrong at Chicago’s Last Black-Owned Bank?

Despite government intervention and new owners, GN Bank fights for survival while customers worry about losing their homes.

Missouri Lawmakers Approve Reforms to Controversial Clean-Energy Loan Program

Lawmakers approve consumer protections and oversight to PACE loans that have disproportionately burdened borrowers in Black neighborhoods.

Clean-Energy Loans Trapped Black Homeowners in Debt. The Legislature Just Started Trying to Fix the Problem.

Lawmakers in Missouri are exploring ways to rein in the state’s clean-energy loan program, which ProPublica found disproportionately harms Black homeowners.

State-Supported “Clean Energy” Loans Are Putting Borrowers at Risk of Losing Their Homes

Dozens of Missouri homeowners who used PACE loans to fix up their houses ended up trapped in debt and could soon see their homes sold at auction.

These Cities Tried to Tackle Disinvestment. Here Are Lessons From What Happened.

Local governments have made efforts to revive commerce in neglected Black neighborhoods around the country. It hasn’t always worked. But Chicago can learn from their experiences.

Disinvested: How Government and Private Industry Let the Main Street of a Black Neighborhood Crumble

A half-century after Chicago’s uprisings in 1968, a once-thriving retail strip in East Garfield Park still suffers from broken promises, bad policy and neglect.

Senior Citizens in Subsidized Housing Have Been Dying Alone at Home, Unnoticed Because of Coronavirus Distancing

The patchwork system of well-being checks in some of Chicago’s public and subsidized housing was not enough to prevent deaths in heartbreaking circumstances.

A Quarter of the Residents at This Nursing Home Died From COVID-19. Families Want Answers.

Within three weeks, the Bria of Geneva nursing home went from one case of COVID-19 to two dozen residents dead and at least 75 infected. Delayed testing and gaps in nursing home data obscures the true toll of the crisis.

In Chicago, Urban Density May Not Be to Blame for the Spread of the Coronavirus

The communities hardest hit by the coronavirus in Chicago are low-density black and Hispanic neighborhoods, including ones where economic decline and population loss have caused more people to live in the same household.

Not All Schools Can #KeepLearning

While educators promote online learning as coronavirus spreads, some Illinois students aren’t equipped with the broadband to even notice.

I’m Not in the NBA Nor Am I Tom Hanks. Here’s How I Lucked Into a COVID-19 Test.

The standard for who gets tested for coronavirus remains confusing and inconsistent. Take my case.

Illinois Hospitals Lack the Beds Needed to Care for the Number of Residents Projected to Get Coronavirus

Use this tool to see if hospitals near you have enough beds to handle the spread of COVID-19.

Use This Tool to Find Potential Conflicts of Interest at Public Universities. We Did.

Researchers at Northwestern University, the University of Chicago, the University of Illinois and other institutions disclosed potential conflicts totaling at least $4 million, according to our “Dollars for Profs” app.

How We Reported This Story

We created the first-ever database of thousands of incidents of restraint and seclusion in Illinois.

How People Are Using Our Chicago Parking Ticket Data in Their Research

Close to 1,300 people have downloaded data from our app, The Ticket Trap. We talked with some of them.

How We Reported This Story

We created the first-ever database of thousands of incidents of seclusion in Illinois.

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