Ian MacDougall

Contributing Reporter

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A lawyer as well as a journalist, he has written about crime, criminal justice and legal affairs for Harper’s, The Atlantic, Slate, The Guardian and n+1. Prior to attending law school, he was an Associated Press reporter, with stints in the Oslo, Norway, and Providence, Rhode Island, bureaus.

The Long Odds Facing Trump’s Attempts to Get State Legislatures to Override Election Results

State representatives in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Arizona and Georgia could do the president’s bidding. But the political and legal obstacles are formidable.

La campaña de Trump no logra encontrar un juez que ignore los hechos, pero no se da por vencida

La estrategia legal de Trump se ha reducido a esto: incluso cuando los jueces desestiman sus demandas por infundadas, presenta otras casi idénticas en nuevos tribunales, con la esperanza de encontrar jueces más favorables. El fracaso no lo ha frenado.

The Trump Campaign Can’t Find a Judge Who Will Ignore Facts — but It’s Trying

The Trump campaign’s legal strategy has come down to this: Even as judges dismiss lawsuits as baseless, it files nearly identical ones in new courts, hoping for more favorable judges. Failure has not slowed it down.

Esto es lo que pasará si Trump intenta lograr una victoria electoral mediante demandas

Es bastante fácil para la campaña de Trump demandar por irregularidades, pero es mucho más difícil presentar pruebas de irregularidades o un argumento jurídico convincente. Esto es lo que debe saber conforme comienzan a acumularse los litigios relacionados con las elecciones.

If Trump Tries to Sue His Way to Election Victory, Here’s What Happens

It’s easy enough for the Trump campaign to file a lawsuit claiming improprieties, but a lot harder to provide evidence of wrongdoing or a convincing legal argument. Here’s what you need to know as the election lawsuits start to mount.

Guía de ProPublica sobre las leyes y demandas electorales de 2020

Independientemente de quién gane la presidencia, las batallas en los tribunales parecen inevitables. A continuación, ofrecemos un panorama general de los estados y las leyes que pueden determinar el resultado.

ProPublica’s Guide to 2020 Election Laws and Lawsuits

Regardless of who wins the presidency, courtroom battles seem almost certain. Here’s a layperson’s look at the states and laws that may determine the outcome.

La importancia del caso Bush vs. Gore en la elección de 2020

La decisión de la Corte Suprema que otorgó la elección de 2000 a George W. Bush no se considera en general un precedente, pero desde entonces ha sido citada en cientos de casos federales y estatales. Y también podría influir en las elecciones de este año.

Why Bush v. Gore Still Matters in 2020

The Supreme Court decision that handed the 2000 election to George W. Bush is widely believed not to be a precedent, yet it’s been cited in hundreds of federal and state cases since. It could play a role in this year’s election, too.

“Cover Up”: House Democrats Subpoena Documents That NLRB Refused to Share in Ethics Investigation

A committee chair is ratcheting up a fight over an investigation into potential conflicts of interests in the NLRB’s repeated efforts to undo an Obama-era rule that expanded liability for corporations like McDonald’s.

How McKinsey Is Making $100 Million (and Counting) Advising on the Government’s Bumbling Coronavirus Response

For the world’s best-known corporate-management consultants, helping tackle the pandemic has been a bonanza. It’s not clear what the government has gotten in return.

Bill Barr Promised to Release Prisoners Threatened by Coronavirus — Even as the Feds Secretly Made It Harder for Them to Get Out

Celebrity prisoners like former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort have been granted home detention, but a secret Bureau of Prisons policy has kept all but 1.8% of federal inmates behind bars, where the virus rages.

“I Do Not Want to Die in Here”: Letters From the Houston Jail

A series of letters from detainees in one of America’s largest jails reveals the mounting dread and uncertainty as the coronavirus spreads inside the 7,500-inmate facility.

McKinsey Called Our Story About Its ICE Contract False. It’s Not.

The consulting giant asserts our story “misleads readers” and “disregards facts” — but its statement mischaracterizes what’s in the article, ignores hundreds of pages of proof we shared with the firm and provides no evidence to back its claims.

How McKinsey Makes Its Own Rules

The consulting giant, which likes to compare itself to the Marines and the Catholic Church, has a habit of disregarding rules and norms in its government work.

New York City Paid McKinsey Millions to Stem Jail Violence. Instead, Violence Soared.

The corporate consulting firm reported bogus numbers and flailed in a project at Rikers Island. Today, assaults and other attacks there are up almost 50%.

How McKinsey Helped the Trump Administration Detain and Deport Immigrants

Newly uncovered documents show the consulting giant helped ICE find “detention savings opportunities” — including some that the agency’s staff viewed as too harsh on immigrants.

Did Rudy Giuliani Nullify His Attorney-Client Protections?

Sometimes he says he’s acting as President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer — and sometimes he says he’s not. That could cost him a key legal shield and force him to cooperate with the House impeachment inquiry.

Trump’s NLRB, Trying to Cut Protections for Millions of Temps and Fast-Food Workers, Trips Up Again

The labor-relations board’s attempt to kill an Obama rule protecting third-party employees fizzled once because of a conflict of interest. Now, two representatives charge, there’s a new conflict and it involves the agency’s own use of temps.

Soon You May Not Even Have to Click on a Website Contract to Be Bound by Its Terms

A private and influential legal group you’ve never heard of is about to vote on what critics call a fundamental rollback of consumer rights.

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