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T. Christian Miller

Senior Reporter

Photo of T. Christian Miller

T. Christian Miller is a senior reporter for ProPublica. In more than 20 years as a professional journalist and foreign correspondent, Miller has covered four wars, a presidential campaign and reported from more than two dozen countries. He has won numerous accolades for his work in the U.S. and abroad, including the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting, which he shared with Ken Armstrong of The Marshall Project for coverage of sexual assault. In 2015, he won two Emmy Awards for his work with Marcela Gaviria on a PBS Frontline Documentary about the link between the Firestone tire company and the Liberian war criminal Charles Taylor. Millerâs work has been featured in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, PBS Frontline, PBS Newshour, NPR and All Thing Considered, among other major media outlets.

As an investigative journalist, Miller specializes in the military and international affairs, particularly multinational corporations operating in foreign countries. He has extensive experience with public records, the Freedom of Information Act and data-driven reporting. In 2011, Miller was awarded a yearlong Knight Fellowship to study at Stanford University. He has lectured at the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Southern California, Stanford, Columbia and Duke, among other schools.

During the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, Miller was the only journalist in the U.S. dedicated exclusively to covering the reconstruction process. Miller's groundbreaking work led to the expulsion of a top Pentagon official, the cancellation of a major arms contract and the initiation of several investigations. In 2006, Miller published Blood Money: Wasted Billions, Lost Lives and Corporate Greed in Iraq (Little, Brown), which the Washington Post called one of the âindispensableâ books on Iraq.

Prior to coming to Washington, Miller was a foreign correspondent based in Bogotá, Colombia where he covered that nation's guerrilla conflict and its connection to Washington's war on drugs. While there, he was briefly captured and held hostage by leftist guerrillas. Miller graduated from the University of California at Berkeley with highest honors. He lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with his wife and three children.

Brain Injuries Remain Undiagnosed in Thousands of Soldiers

The military medical system is failing to diagnose brain injuries in tens of thousands of soldiers who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, and many of them receive little or no treatment for lingering health problems, despite years of promises, an investigation by NPR and ProPublica has found.

Contractor Deaths Accelerating in Afghanistan as They Outnumber Soldiers

Of the 289 civilian contractors killed since the war in Afghanistan started, 100 have died in just the last six months, a recent analysis shows. That's a reflection of both growing violence and the importance of the civilians flooding into the country.

FRONTLINE Video: Donnell Herrington

Has Health Care Bickering Blocked Afghan Police Training Inquiry?

A Senate committee hearing on the problems that the U.S. has faced in training Afghan police forces was canceled just hours before it was supposed to start. Democrats accuse Republicans of being obstructionist in blocking the hearing.

How Many Cops on the Beat?

War Contractors Receive Defense of Freedom Medal for Injuries, But Attract Little Notice

Since 2001, more than 1,700 civilian contractors have died in Iraq and Afghanistan and nearly 40,000 have been reported injured. But some who were at a medal ceremony on Wednesday say their contributions to the military effort go largely overlooked.

AIGs Man in Jordan (in Arabic)

Chart: Iraqi Translators, a Casualty List

Foreign Interpreters Hurt in Battle Find U.S. Insurance Benefits Wanting

An insurance program funded by American taxpayers was supposed to provide a safety net for Iraqi interpreters and their families in the event of injury or death. Yet for many, the benefits have fallen painfully short of what was promised, an investigation by the Los Angeles Times and ProPublica found.

Honoring Veterans of the Disposable Army

U.N. Responds to Our Story

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