Tracy Weber

Deputy Managing Editor

Photo of Tracy Weber

Tracy Weber is a deputy managing editor at ProPublica, where she helps oversee and maximize projects across the newsroom.

Weber joined the original ProPublica staff as a reporter in 2008 from the Los Angeles Times, where she paired with Charles Ornstein on a series of articles about a troubled hospital that won the Pulitzer Prize for public service in 2005, among other awards. At ProPublica, she and Ornstein were finalists for the same award in 2010 for a series on the broken oversight of nurses

Weber joined ProPublica’s editing ranks in 2014. In the six years that followed, work she edited won virtually every significant honor in journalism. Among other standouts, this includes a series she co-edited on grave, systemic problems in the Navy that won the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting; reporting on family separations, which won the Peabody Award’s first ever Catalyst Award, a George Polk award and was a Pulitzer finalist; and a series on jailhouse informants that won a National Magazine Award. She also guided hallmark series on how the financial system punishes the working poor; the gutting of the workers’ comp system; the toxic effect of blood spatter forensics on the justice system; and the rampant waste and perverse incentives in health care.

Eight Ways to Strengthen Medicare’s Drug Benefit

Former government officials, analysts and researchers say Medicare could improve oversight of its Part D drug benefit with these steps.

Prescriber Checkup

Medicare’s popular prescription-drug program serves more than 42 million people and pays for more than one of every four prescriptions written nationwide. Use this tool to find and compare doctors and other providers in Part D in 2015.

Medicare Drug Program Fails to Monitor Prescribers, Putting Seniors and Disabled at Risk

Prescription data obtained by ProPublica shows wide use of antipsychotics, narcotics and other drugs dangerous for older adults, but Medicare officials say it's not their job to look for unsafe prescribing or weed out doctors with troubled backgrounds.

Dollars for Docs Mints a Millionaire

New data show drugmakers’ payments to hundreds of thousands of doctors, and some have made well over $500,000.

About the Dollars for Docs Data

Details behind our drug company money database.

Feds to Publicize Drug and Device Company Payments to Doctors Next Year

After a long delay, the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services published final rules for the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, which would bring transparency to financial relationships between physicians and industry.

High-Prescribing Chicago Psychiatrist Faces Federal Fraud Suit

Dr. Michael Reinstein, subject of a 2009 investigation by ProPublica and The Chicago Tribune, is accused of taking kickbacks while providing antipsychotics to thousands of indigent nursing home patients.

The Outlook for “Obamacare” in Two Maps

How states handle Medicaid and new insurance exchanges will determine if President Obama’s re-election victory gives his healthcare overhaul a boost.

Why Can't Medicine Seem to Fix Simple Mistakes?

The death of 12-year-old Rory Staunton from septic shock prompted NYU's Langone Medical Center to revamp its emergency room procedures to address a startling lapse. History shows that the profession is unlikely to learn from this mistake.

Patient Died at New York VA Hospital After Alarm Was Ignored

The Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General again found problems with the care provided by nurses in a cardiac monitoring unit at the VA hospital in Manhattan.

American Pain Foundation Shuts Down as Senators Launch Investigation of Prescription Narcotics

Sens. Baucus and Grassley demand evidence of financial support from the drug industry to nonprofit groups that advocate use of opioid painkillers, including the newly defunct American Pain Foundation.

VA Nurses Scrutinized After Patient Deaths in Two States

A review of records at 29 Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals found that some facilities didn't keep proper track of their nurses' skills or competency.

Allergan Erases Doctor Payment Records

You can still find some older Allergan payments in ProPublica's Dollars for Docs database, along with data from 11 other drug companies.

Senate Watchdog Targets High-Prescribing Medicaid Docs

Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, wants to know why an Ohio doctor wrote 54 prescriptions per weekday for the antipsychotic Abilify, while the biggest prescriber of Seroquel wrote an average nine prescriptions per hour.

Drug Companies Reduce Payments to Doctors as Scrutiny Mounts

Continued reporting on the influence of pharmaceutical money on medicine spurred tighter rules at medical schools across the nation.

The Champion of Painkillers

The annual death toll from overdoses of painkillers has reached almost 15,000, prompting the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to term it an "epidemic." But the American Pain Foundation continues to claim the risks are overblown. The advocacy group's biggest supporter? The drug industry.

Two Leaders in Pain Treatment Have Long Ties to Drug Industry

American Pain Foundation board members Scott Fishman and Perry Fine, both physicians, have lectured and authored publications funded by makers of narcotic painkillers. They say the support doesn’t bias them.

Florida Sanctions Top Medicaid Prescribers — But Only After A Shove

Medicaid programs have long had evidence that a few physicians prescribed risky drugs in excess, but it wasn’t until Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, demanded to know the top prescribers that states began to investigate.

Feds File Massive Fraud Case Against Allied Home Mortgage

Houston-based Allied and its founder, Jim Hodge, were the subject of a July 2010 investigation by ProPublica detailing alleged misconduct in 18 states. The government suspended Allied from issuing government-backed mortgages, saying nearly a third of its FHA loans between 2001 and 2010 defaulted.

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