Trump, Inc.

Exploring the Business of Trump

He’s the president, yet we’re still trying to answer basic questions about how his business works: what deals are happening, whom they’re happening with, and if the president and his family are keeping their promise to separate the Trump Organization from the Trump White House.

“Trump, Inc.” is a joint reporting project from WNYC Studios and ProPublica that digs deep into those questions. We’ll be laying out what we know, what we don’t and how you can help us fill in the gaps.

Find “Trump, Inc.” wherever you get your podcasts.

The Kushners’ Freddie Mac Loan Wasn’t Just Massive. It Came With Unusually Good Terms, Too.

Despite a history of underperforming properties, Kushner Companies received a near-record sum from a government-backed lender. Should it default, taxpayers could be forced to foot much of the bill. The agency says politics played no role.

Before Limiting Ballot Drop Boxes to One Per County, Top Ohio Election Officials Secretly Consulted Promoter of Debunked Voting Fraud Fears

After Black union workers petitioned the state for more secure ballot drop boxes, top election officials called Hans von Spakovsky, a leading purveyor of discredited voting fraud claims, and then put a strict limit on the boxes instead.

Rick Perry’s Ukrainian Dream

When the then-energy secretary accidentally helped lead the president into impeachment, he was simultaneously trying to help his friends cash in on a big gas deal.

It’s Illegal for Federal Officials to Campaign on the Job. Trump Staffers Keep Doing It Anyway.

Trump administration officials have been cited 13 times for violating the Hatch Act, a New Deal-era law prohibiting government officials from engaging in campaigning.

The Trump Campaign’s Legal Strategy Includes Suing a Tiny TV Station in Northern Wisconsin

The president’s reelection campaign has paid millions to law firms filing defamation suits against news organizations. Media law experts say the lawsuits are doomed, but Trump could still get what he wants.

Three Takeaways From the Supreme Court’s Decisions on Trump’s Tax and Financial Documents

The Supreme Court finally ruled on whether Congress and investigators can obtain the president’s financial information. The answer is yes — but it’s a little more complicated than that.

Why Do People Want to See Donald Trump’s Tax Returns?

Trump has broken a long tradition of presidents sharing their tax histories. Two Supreme Court cases are looking at whether House committees and a New York grand jury can subpoena financial institutions for Trump’s personal and business tax filings.

What the Trump Campaign Is Up To on YouTube (Hint: It Involves Aliens, Bin Laden and Ivanka)

Mostly stymied from holding his mass rallies, the world’s most famous Twitter user is turning to a different part of the internet — but with the same message.

“I Can’t Speak Negatively About the President,” Says Official Charged With Stimulus Oversight

President Donald Trump’s purge of watchdogs is on the mind of one of the newly hired officials charged with overseeing the more than $2 trillion CARES Act.

Trump Tower’s 2010 Profits Magically Grew By $3 Million In New Loan Filings

One set of reports listed the tower’s 2010 profits as $13.3 million; a second put them at $16.1 million. That helped the Trump Organization borrow $73 million more than it had before.

Trump’s Lawyers Argue for “Temporary Presidential Immunity”

Andrea Bernstein of “Trump, Inc.” and NYU law professor Melissa Murray listened to the historic Supreme Court arguments about Trump’s tax returns and chatted with co-host Ilya Marritz about what struck them. Here are their takeaways.

Meet the Shadowy Accountants Who Do Trump’s Taxes and Help Him Seem Richer Than He Is

The Supreme Court fight over Donald Trump’s tax returns has pushed his accounting firm into the limelight. In various episodes over 30 years, partners — including the CEO — have run into trouble for fraud, misconduct or malpractice.

The Bigoted, Conspiratorial Rants of Rudy Giuliani’s Radio Show

Rudy Giuliani has baselessly speculated that the coronavirus could be a plot by the Chinese government, and that “life doesn’t mean” to them what it means in Western civilization. It’s one of several rants we found while listening to his broadcasts.

How Jared Kushner Is Tackling the White House’s Coronavirus Response — Without Any Evident Experience

The president’s son-in-law and adviser has added the emergency-response supply chain to his extensive list of duties. He views himself as a disrupter — but that’s not always a good thing.

Yes, Trump Hotels Do Appear to Qualify for Coronavirus Bailout Benefits.

President Donald Trump’s hotels in D.C., New York and Chicago all seem to qualify for benefits from the coronavirus bailout. So does his winery lodge in Virginia.

How the Rich and Powerful Profit From Crises Like Coronavirus

On the new episode of our “Trump, Inc.” podcast, one expert says powerful players often “take advantage of adversity and uncertainty to enrich themselves.” Help us figure out who’s trying that with the coronavirus crisis.

Trump’s Company Paid Bribes to Reduce Property Taxes, Assessors Say

Five former city employees and a former Trump Organization employee say the company used middlemen to pay New York City tax assessors to lower building assessments and pay less taxes in the 1980s and 1990s.

How Much Has the Government Spent at Trump’s Properties? It Won’t Say.

“He’s paying our money to himself,” the Washington Post’s David Fahrenthold told “Trump, Inc.” “There must be so much more we haven’t seen.”

How Parnas and Fruman’s Dodgy Donation Was Uncovered by Two People Using Google Translate

This week, “Trump, Inc.” examines the money that helped two unlikely players shape the Trump administration’s Ukraine campaign — and the unlikely events that allowed their financial machinations to come to light.

Reporting Recipe: How to Identify Suspicious Campaign Finance Records

This week’s episode of “Trump, Inc.” reveals how watchdogs discovered contributions eventually traced to key figures in the Ukraine scandal. Here’s how regular people can do the same on their own.

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