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Topic
Project
Have You Been Harmed in a Medical Facility?
Goal
Help inform our reporting on patient safety by telling us about your own experiences.
Overview
by Marshall Allen and Olga Pierce
ProPublica, Sep. 25, 2012, 4:07 pm

You could fill a baseball stadium many times over with the number of people who have been harmed while undergoing medical treatment each year. And that's why we're investigating the state of patient safety in the U.S. If you or a loved one has suffered patient harm, you can help inform and guide our reporting by filling out the form below. It asks quite a few questions, but please don't be intimidated. Just do your best to summarize your story and one of us will follow up if we have additional questions. We promise we'll keep your information confidential unless you give us permission to share it.

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