ProPublica

Journalism in the Public Interest

Cancel

Medicare Spent $4.5 Billion on New Hepatitis C Drugs Last Year

Medicare's spending on the drugs soared from 2013 to 2014 as new breakthroughs came to the market, according to previously undisclosed federal data. The drugs cure the disease, but taxpayers are footing the bill.
Private Emails Reveal Ex-Clinton Aide’s Secret Spy Network

Private Emails Reveal Ex-Clinton Aide's Secret Spy Network

Obamacare, Five Years In (MuckReads Edition)
Dollars for Docs logo

Has Your Health Professional Received Drug Company Money?

Search by name, by affiliated business or institution, or by city.

Example searches:
Klein, Duke University, Miami

More Stories

How is Obamacare Affecting You in 2015? Help Us Report on Problems, Progress with the ACA

We are continuing our reporting on the Affordable Care Act in 2015 and we’d love to hear how your plan worked (or didn’t) in 2014.

Let The Game of Whack-A-Mole Begin: Feds Put Forward New Payday Rules

New rules put forward by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau would have a major impact on the high-cost loan industry. But if history is any guide, lenders will quickly find some loopholes.

California Workers’ Comp Law Gets Criticism, Praise at Senate Hearing

Some hearing witnesses say the 2012 reform law had “unintended consequences,” prompting insurers to deny medical care and doctors to leave the system.

New York Still Charges Teenagers as Adults. Will Cuomo’s Bill Change That?

New York is poised to pass a new juvenile sentencing bill that would keep many minors from being charged as adults, but some critics say it doesn’t go far enough.

What We Still Don’t Know About the Fed’s Leak Investigation

After looking for nearly six months, the Federal Reserve says it couldn’t find out who had shared confidential policy information. Critics in Congress aren’t satisfied with the account.

Recapping Workers’ Compensation: A Q & A with ProPublica and NPR

ProPublica reporter Michael Grabell, NPR reporter Howard Berkes and ProPublica news applications developer Lena Groeger took questions about the investigation into America's workers' comp system on Reddit.

The Fallout of Workers’ Comp ‘Reforms’: 5 Tales of Harm

Injured workers share their stories, revealing the real-life impact of rollbacks that have been spreading across the country.

California to Insurers: Don’t Use Workers’ Comp Law to Deny Approved Care

Concern over possible misuse of a 2012 workers’ comp law has led to warnings from state labor officials. A state senate committee will hold a hearing on the law Wednesday.

How Much Water Do You Use? Help ProPublica Investigate Water Use in the U.S.

We want to know how you use water at home — and how what you actually use compares to government estimates

MuckReads Podcast: Gawker’s John Cook on Why He’s No ‘Journalist’

An investigations editor says reporting doesn’t need labels – or grandiose packaging – to be interesting and informative.

Progress and Controversy Arrive With New Rules for Fracking on Public Lands

An initial review of rules issued by the Interior Department shows the federal government has taken important steps to protect drinking water resources, while not adopting the strictest regulations in place in some states

« Story Archive | or Browse

Major Projects

see all »

Losing Ground

Scientists say one of the greatest environmental and economic disasters in the nation’s history—the rapid land loss occurring in the Mississippi Delta—is rushing toward a catastrophic conclusion. ProPublica and The Lens explore why it’s happening and what we’ll all lose if nothing is done to stop it.

1 Stories in the Series. Latest:

Reporting From the Youngest Land in the World

See entire series »

What We Still Don’t Know About the Fed’s Leak Investigation

What We Still Don’t Know About the Fed’s Leak Investigation

After looking for nearly six months, the Federal Reserve says it couldn’t find out who had shared confidential policy information. Critics in Congress aren’t satisfied with the account.

See entire series »

California Workers’ Comp Law Gets Criticism, Praise at Senate Hearing

California Workers’ Comp Law Gets Criticism, Praise at Senate Hearing

Some hearing witnesses say the 2012 reform law had “unintended consequences,” prompting insurers to deny medical care and doctors to leave the system.

See entire series »

Red Cross

After Superstorm Sandy, Americans opened their wallets to the Red Cross. They trusted the charity and believed it was up to the job. They were wrong.

14 Stories in the Series. Latest:

Red Cross Demands Corrections to Our 'Misleading' Coverage. Here's Our Response

See entire series »

Firestone and the Warlord

In the first detailed examination of the relationship between Firestone and Liberian warlord Charles Taylor, this ProPublica/Frontline investigation lays bare the role of a global corporation in a brutal African conflict.

13 Stories in the Series. Latest:

Union Buried Evidence of Firestone Support of Warlord After Labor Deal

See entire series »

Unforgiven

The way lenders and collectors pursue consumer debt has undergone an aggressive transformation in America. Collectors today don’t give up easy, often pursuing debts for years. It’s now routine for companies to sue debtors, then seize their wages or the cash in their bank accounts. For many people, these changes have profoundly affected their lives.

13 Stories in the Series. Latest:

Senator to Hospitals: Stop Suing Poor Patients

See entire series »