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Do You Have Concerns About Pharma Payments to Your Doctor?
Goal
Help inform our ongoing reporting on the relationship between drug companies and healthcare professionals
Overview
by Blair Hickman
ProPublica, Mar. 11, 2013, 11:00 am

Icons courtesy of the Noun Project

Since 2010, we've been aggregating and publishing payments to health care providers from a growing list of drug companies. These payments are legal, so if your doctor is listed in our tool, it doesn't mean he or she has done anything wrong. Using our app can provide you with questions you may want to ask your doctor.

We're trying to learn more about the relationship between drug companies, medical professionals and how that affects patient care. If you believe your doctor has received money, please help inform reporting by filling out the form below. You can also email us at drugs@propublica.org

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