ProPublica

Journalism in the Public Interest

Cancel
Topic
Project
Prescribers: What You Think About Medicare Part D?
Goal
Gain insight on what prescribers think about Medicare Part D
Overview
by Blair Hickman
ProPublica, May. 11, 2013, 8:54 pm

In 2010, Medicare’s popular drug program paid for 1.1 billion prescriptions written by 1.7 million doctors, nurses and other health care providers. For the first time, the public can see who's prescribing what – and how they compare to others – with our tool, Prescriber Checkup. 

Are you a health care provider listed in our Prescriber Checkup? We’d love to hear your reaction. Your insights will help inform our ongoing reporting on Medicare Part D. We promise we’ll keep the information you submit confidential.

Get Involved
blog comments powered by Disqus

Projects You Can Help With

.

Help Us Report On The American Red Cross

Share A Tip

.

Have You Ever Been Sued Over a Debt? Help ProPublica Investigate Collection Practices

Share Your Story

53 tips shared

.

Help Us Investigate Internships for Academic Credit

Find Out How

103 submissions

.

Join Our Reporting Network for Updates on Ways to ‘Get Involved’

Sign Up

6459 signed up

More on This Investigation

Fanny Pack Mixup Unravels Massive Medicare Fraud Scheme

Two secretaries in a doctor’s office have pleaded guilty and a pharmacy owner faces charges in a scam that Medicare allowed to thrive for more than two years.

Following Abuses, Medicare Tightens Reins on Its Drug Program

Medicare gives itself the power to ban physicians if they prescribe medications in abusive ways. The action follows a series of articles by ProPublica documenting inappropriate prescribing, waste and fraud in its popular drug program.

The Perils of Problematic Prescribing: A Double Dose of Warnings

Two new reports from the CDC show the dangers of overprescribing narcotics and antibiotics. Is there a way for doctors and consumers to make better decisions?

Medicare’s Drug Program Needs Stronger Protections Against Fraud, Watchdog Says

A new report finds that more than half of insurance companies in Medicare’s drug program haven’t reported fraud cases to the government. The findings echo an earlier ProPublica investigation that found fraud flourishing in the program.