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Providers: Tell Us What You Know About Patient Safety
Overview
by Marshall Allen and Olga Pierce
ProPublica, Sep. 18, 2012, 3:57 pm

(BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/ Getty Images)

Are you an administrator, doctor, nurse or some other type of health care worker who could contribute to our patient safety stories? We know that your first-hand knowledge could be a valuable resource as we continue to report on patient safety. Please complete the following questionnaire, and pass it along to others you know who care about these issues. We may be getting in touch to ask you to point us in the right direction. We'll keep your information confidential. 

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