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The Oct. 24, 2014, article, Judge Doesn’t ‘Think’ Police are Abusing Spy Technology, and More in MuckReads, originally stated that residents were paying 20 percent more in property tax bills when in fact the analysis shows that 20 percent or more of residents are paying the wrong property tax bill.

The Oct. 10, 2014, article, This Alabama Judge Has Figured Out How to Dismantle Roe v. Wade, incorrectly said Justice Kennedy had voted in favor of every abortion restriction measure that had come before him on the court. In fact, in Planned Parenthood v. Casey, he voted against a spousal notification requirement while upholding other limits in the Pennsylvania law. The article also used “crucifix” when “cross” was the appropriate word.

The Sept. 24, 2014, article, Fact-Checking Feinstein on the Assault Weapons Ban, incorrectly referred to a round of ammunition as a “bullet.” Properly speaking, ammunition rounds include not just the bullet, but also propellant, primer, and case.

The Sept. 16, 2014, article, Old Debts, Fresh Pain: Weak Laws Offer Debtors Little Protection, and an accompanying photo caption originally misattributed a quote about “feeling hopeless” to Conrad Goetzinger. It was his fiancée, Cassandra Rose, who said it.

The Sept. 12, 2014, article, Why Do Democrats Keep Trying to Ban Guns That Look Scary, Not the Guns That Kill the Most People?, originally incorrectly cited a statistic on the use of handguns in killings in the United States in the early 1990s. They were used in more than 80 percent of gun murders — not all murders. Also, the article has been clarified to note that before Democrats succeeded in banning a category of guns called “assault weapons,” the firearms industry had used similar language to market civilian semiautomatic versions of military guns.

The Sept. 2, 2014, article, A Judge’s Status, Robed in Silence, incorrectly characterized Lawrence Goldman’s position on disciplining judges who have engaged in misconduct. Goldman, a former member of the New York State Commission on Judicial Misconduct, favors allowing the commission to impose, in certain circumstances, a temporary suspension for a judge found to have erred, but whose conduct does not warrant removal from the bench. He does not favor allowing the commission to suspend a judge during an active investigation.

The Jul. 30, 2014, column, Does Valeant’s Cost-Cutting Go Too Far?, incorrectly stated that Ryan Weldon was the head of Valeant’s aesthetics business. Weldon no longer works for the company.

The Jul. 3, 2014, article, Privacy Tools: How to Block Online Tracking, misspelled an Electronic Frontier Foundation technologist’s last name. His name is Cooper Quintin, not Quentin.

The Jun. 19, 2014, article, Violent and Legal: The Shocking Ways School Kids are Being Pinned Down, Isolated Against Their Will, featured an illustration which previously stated that Minnesota does not allow prone restraints on disabled children and that the state will ban the tactics in August 2015. In fact, Minnesota allows the use of prone restraints in an emergency, on disabled children aged five or older. Minnesota is currently enacting regulations to limit prone restraints, and it is uncertain changes in prone restraint regulations will occur by August 2015.

The Jun. 10, 2014, article, Myth vs. Fact: Violence and Mental Health, misstated one of the findings of a gun study. After Connecticut added mental health records to its background check system, people who had been disqualified from owning a gun showed a 53 drop, not a 6 percent drop, in their likelihood of committing a violent crime.

The Jun. 16, 2015, article, Iowa Court Tosses Sentence in HIV Exposure Case, incorrectly said Iowa’s new HIV transmission law was opposed by some advocates in the state and nationally. It was not opposed by advocates in the state.

The Jun. 10, 2014, article, Myth vs. Fact: Violence and Mental Health, incorrectly identified Dr. Swanson as a psychiatrist. Dr. Swanson, a professor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Duke University School of Medicine, is a medical sociologist.

The Apr. 23, 2014, article, MIA In The War On Cancer: Where Are The Low-Cost Treatments?, incorrectly spelled the name of oncologist Gauri Bhide as Guari Bhide.

The Apr. 1, 2014, article, Feds to Look Harder at Cell Carriers When Tower Climbers Die, incorrectly spelled the name of Jon Dailey in a caption. In fact, his name is spelled John.

The Apr. 1, 2014, article, In Fracking Fight, a Worry About How Best to Measure Health Threats, mistakenly said that the Marcellus shale formation had produced two million cubic feet of gas by 2012. In fact, it had produced two trillion cubic feet of gas.

On Mar. 14, 2014, we mistakenly published a non-final draft of the article Four Ways to Really Fix the Pentagon’s Effort to ID the Missing and have since replaced that copy in its entirety. The differences were entirely stylistic, and there were no changes of fact.

The Mar. 6, 2014, article, The Military is Leaving the Missing Behind, mistakenly said the wife of John Eakin was Joan. In fact, her name is Jean.

The Feb. 18, 2014, article, Hydrogen Fuel Set to Take Off, But Safety Concerns Remain, mistakenly said that Gov. Jerry Brown had agreed to spend over $2 billion on hydrogen fueling stations. Gov. Brown has allocated $2 billion for clean-vehicle incentives over the next ten years. $20 million a year has been set aside specifically for hydrogen-fueling stations.

The Feb. 14, 2014, article, When a University Hospital Backs a Surgical Robot, Controversy Ensues, incorrectly spelled the name of Merrillville, Indiana as Merryville, Indiana.

The Feb. 3, 2014, article, The PTSD Crisis That’s Being Ignored: Americans Wounded in Their Own Neighborhoods, previously said that ProPublica surveyed a top-level trauma center in each of the 22 cities with the nation’s highest homicide rates. In fact, we surveyed trauma centers in only 21 of the cities with the nation’s highest homicide rates. We mistakenly included Dallas in this survey. It only ranks 46th among cities with a population of at least 100,000, according to 2012 FBI statistics.

The June 12, 2013, article, Gitmo Diary: Visiting the U.S.’s Most Infamous Courtroom, previously said Guantanamo Bay’s courtroom is housed in the “Expeditionary Legal Center.” In fact it’s housed in the “Expeditionary Legal Complex.”

The March 12, 2013, article, Dollars for Docs: The Top Earners, mistakenly listed Warren Joseph’s location as Coatesville, Pa. In fact, he sees patients in Philadelphia and has not worked in Coatesville for several years.

An article briefly posted on Aug. 28, relying on published reports, stated that American Action Network was paying for the band Journey to appear at the Republican National Convention in Tampa. The spokesman for the network says the group is not sponsoring the band. The American Action Network and the American Action Forum, a sister nonprofit, are sponsoring the pavilion at the RNC where Journey, Kid Rock and Trace Adkins are performing.

The Aug. 27, 2012, article, How an Obscure Federal Rule Could Be Shaking Up Presidential Politics, originally said that the federal rules posed a challenge in 2004 when Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin was chosen by Sen. John McCain to be his running mate. It was actually in 2008.

The Aug. 24, 2012, article, Army Study Finds Troops Suffer Concussions in Training,  incorrectly stated that “Fort Hood, in Texas, is one of the Army’s main centers for basic training.” In fact, it is one of Army’s major bases, but it is not one of its main centers for basic training.

The Aug. 22, 2012, column, Small Banks Get Theirs Too: Treasury’s Quiet Bailout, referred incorrectly to the ability of banks to skip dividend payments under TARP. Not all banks can skip the payments; banks that are bank holding companies cannot.

The Aug. 11, 2012, article, Paul Ryan Reading Guide: The Best Reporting on the VP Candidate, originally said that the Mother Jones article was published in November 2012. It was actually published in May 2011.

The Aug. 2, 2012, article, Washington’s War on Leaks, Explained, originally said that Tom Devine was the legal director for the Whistleblower Protection Act. He is, in fact, legal director of the Government Accountability Project.

The Aug. 2, 2012, article, Despite Supreme Court Ruling, Many Minors May Stay in Prison for Life, incorrectly identified Dan Filler as a Drake law professor on second reference. He is a Drexel law professor.

The July 23, 2012, article, Everything You’ve Ever Wanted to Know About Voter ID Laws, originally said Texas went to federal court to challenge the DOJ’s denial of preclearance. In fact, Texas filed a lawsuit seeking preclearance from the federal district court two months before the DOJ announced its decision. Also, some states require a government-issued photo that does not have to come from the federal government as first detailed.

The June 26, 2012, article, Cellphone Companies Will Share Your Location Data - Just Not With You, mistakenly repeated T-Mobile’s comment as Sprint’s response. We have also updated the story to include an additional response from AT&T. 

The June 6, 2012 article, Guiding You Through the Govt’s Foreclosure Compensation Maze, and the FAQ, Our FAQ on The National Foreclosure Settlement and Independent Foreclosure Review, have been updated to reflect the fact that homeowners can submit their application for the Independent Foreclosure Review online. They have also been updated to clarify that homeowners eligible for the review will only be receiving a reminder through the mail this summer, not another copy of the request for review form.

The June 4, 2012 article, How Bank of America Execs Hid Losses—In Their Own Words, has been corrected to show that Kenneth Lewis did not say the words “no longer accurate;” instead, it was attorneys paraphrasing his position.

The May 18, 2012 article, Donations to Scott Walker Flagged as Potential Fraud, originally identified eZcontribution, a Wisconsin company, as running the website handling donations to Friends of Scott Walker. In fact, there are several websites that handle donations to the campaign. EZcontribution says it has no record of processing a charge to Nellis’ credit card.

In the May 24, 2012 article, Built for a Simpler Era, OSHA Struggles When Tower Climbers Die,  a reference to the Kentucky Department of Labor has been corrected to the Kentucky Labor Cabinet.

Citing a court order, a Jan. 20, 2012, story, Actual Winner Unclear in Supreme Court’s Ruling on Texas Redistricting, stated that a federal court in Washington, D.C., had said that the maps drawn by Texas’ state legislature were problematic. In fact, the court ruled that the state’s defense of the legislature’s maps—not necessarily the maps themselves—were problematic.

A Dec. 21, 2011, story, How Democrats Fooled California’s Redistricting Commission, originally stated that the Asian population of Long Beach was less than 1 percent. It has been corrected to say that the Vietnamese population of Long Beach is 1 percent. The story also previously stated that Rep. Judy Chu previously served as a state senator. In fact, she served in the state assembly.

A Dec. 16, 2011, story, Perry More Generous With Pardons Than Romney, erroneously said that Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s 2010 pardons of nine people included “two men who served probation for unlawful possession of narcotics in the early 1970s.” In fact, Perry pardoned these men in 2004.

A Dec. 15, 2011, story, Senator Wants Answers on Program to Test Soldiers for Brain Injuries, erroneously said a letter sent by Sen. McCaskill said contractors have been paid $42 million. It said they have been paid $32 million.

A Dec. 4, 2011, story, Pardon Applicants Benefit From Friends in High Places, incorrectly stated that David B. McCall Jr. was convicted in 1996 of falsifying loan records. McCall pleaded guilty to that charge on Oct. 10, 1996. A judgment and sentencing were entered on Jan. 17, 1997.  The article also misstated the timing of his family’s quest for a pardon; the effort began seven years, not 24 years, after his conviction.

A Nov. 28, 2011, story, Testing Program Fails Soldiers, Leaving Brain Injuries Undetected, originally misstated the name of the contractor that has given soldiers the ANAM test over the last four years. It should be Eyak Services, not Eyak Technology.

A Nov. 10, 2011, story, Energy Dept. Panel Warns of Environmental Toll of Current Gas Drilling Practices, originally made it seem as if Reid Porter, an API spokesman, said that drillers have opposed some of the energy panel’s recommendations. Porter did not comment on that issue.

A Nov. 3, 2011, story, America’s Growing Income Gap, by the Numbers, included a chart that incorrectly stated that the 81st-99th percentiles accounted for 28.6 percent of U.S. income in 2007. In fact, they accounted for 38.6 percent of U.S. income.

A Nov. 1, 2011, story, U.S. Government Glossed Over Cancer Concerns As It Rolled Out Airport X-Ray Scanners, originally said that an email in which the TSA health and safety director said inspectors were “radiation myth busters” incorrectly identified them as Rapiscan’s inspectors. The story should have said they were inspectors from the Army Public Health Command.

An Oct. 5, 2011, story, What Is Obama’s Actual Record on Creating Jobs?, erroneously referred to the “ bailouts of General Motors, Ford and Chrysler.” Only General Motors and Chrysler received government assistance. We also stated that GM added 45,000 jobs after exiting bankruptcy. In fact, it’s the car industry overall that added 45,000 jobs after GM exited bankruptcy. We have also clarified that one’s study’s conclusion about the number of jobs the auto bailout saved included jobs created directly and indirectly.

An Oct. 4, 2011, story, What Are the Latest Revelations About Koch Industries? referred to Koch-Glitsch as “France-based.” It has offices around the world, including in France; its main European office is in Italy.

An Oct. 4, 2011, story, Secret Docs Show Foreclosure Watchdog Doesn’t Bark or Bite, mistakenly stated that the Treasury has restored HAMP incentive payments for two of the three companies that had previously had their payments withheld. In fact, only one company had its payments restored.

A Sept. 30, 2011, story, This Week’s Top MuckReads: Warlords, Shell Companies and Shady College Football, said that one story was by iWatch and ABC News. In fact, it is by iWatch and CBS News.

A Sept. 27, 2011, story, Corporations Couldn’t Wait to ‘Check the Box’ on Huge Tax Break originally stated that tax lawyer Philip D. Morrison said in a prominent tax journal that the Obama proposal to change the tax provision was ridiculous. Morrison actually said that it was “ridiculous” for the Obama Treasury to claim check-the-box allowed for an “unintended avoidance of current U.S. tax.”

A Sept. 1, 2011, story, Who Are America’s Top 10 Gas Drillers?, originally said that more than 90 percent of Devon’s U.S. reserves are in natural gas. It’s actually more than 70 percent.

An Aug. 31, 2011, column, Bank of America Gets Buffetted, referred incorrectly to the investment’s impact on the bank’s capital. Of the $5 billion, $2 billion will count in the measure of capital called Tier 1, under the current capital standard known as Basel 1. The column erroneously said that none of the $5 billion would count as Tier 1 capital.

An Aug. 18, 2011, story, Economic Myths: We Separate Fact From Fiction, incorrectly said the only tax increases passed during the Obama administration were part of the health-care reform bill. In fact, the excise tax on cigarettes and other tobacco products was also raised as part of a children’s health insurance bill in February 2009.

A July 20, 2011, story, Will Innovative New Financial Regulator Be Hobbled Before It Even Starts, incorrectly stated that the House Appropriations Committee had cut the Securities and Exchange Commission’s budget by $222.5 million. While the committee has proposed the cut, it has yet to be enacted.

A June 3 story, From Dodd-Frank to Dud: How Financial Reform May Be Going Wrong, incorrectly stated that the Dodd-Frank law had stripped the position of chief counsel at the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency of its civil service status protection, based on erroneous information provided by Rep. Barney Frank. The provision was included in the House bill, but was excluded in the final version of the law.

A May 31, 2011, article, Confessed Terrorist Tried To Help U.S. Track Down Other Terrorists, originally said that Headley was arrested last October. He was in fact arrested in October 2009. Also, Wired magazine spotted an error in David Coleman Headley’s testimony. Headley said that the CEO of Lockheed Martin had been targeted for assassination, because Lockheed makes the drones that are used to kill terrorists in Pakistan. It turns out that General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, not Lockheed, makes the drones. Lockheed does, however, make the Hellfire missiles used by the drones.

A May 19, 2011, article, Forced Pooling: When Landowners Can’t Say No to Drilling, has been corrected. It should have made clear that state regulations in New York and Virginia require drillers to lease a certain percentage of the acreage in a drilling unit before forced pooling or compulsory integration can occur, rather than a percentage of the landowners. This story also originally said 38 states have some form of forced pooling law. Actually, 39 states do.

An April 14, 2011, article, U.S. Senate Investigation Gives New Details on Magnetar, incorrectly attributed an additional email to Greg Lippmann and quoted from that email as referring to Magnetar when in fact it was referring to another hedge fund.

An April 11, 2011, article, NOPD Beating Death Trial Draws to a Close, mistakenly said NOPD officers Melvin Williams and Matthew Dean Moore were both charged with striking and kicking Robair. Prosecutors charged Williams with beating Robair, not Moore. Moore faces a charge of lying to the FBI and both officers face obstruction charges for falsifying a police report.

An April 11, 2011, article, Pa.’s New Jobs Czar Fought Enviro Regs for Years, originally stated that the Pennsylvania governor was Tom Ridge in 2003 when the DEP reached a settlement agreement with Walker to resolve all of his companies’ outstanding treatment responsibilities. In fact, Ed Rendell was governor at the time.

An April 6, 2011, article, Charter Schools Outsource Education to Management Firms, With Mixed Results, originally stated that contracts between White Hat Management and the schools suing the company had been extended and were set to expire this summer. In fact, the parties recently agreed to extend the agreement for another year, ending in the summer of 2012.

A March 9, 2011 article, Fort Bragg Infant Death Toll May Climb to Twelve, originally stated that Chris Grey was a spokesman for Fort Bragg’s Criminal Investigation Command. He is actually the spokesman for the Army’s Criminal investigation Command.

A Feb. 24, 2011 article, California County Opens Review Into Autopsies by Doctor With Checkered Past, mistakenly said that in 2009 the Solano County Sheriff hired Dr. Susan Comfort to be the county’s chief forensic pathologist. The sheriff hired Dr. Susan Hogan for the job.

A Feb. 18, 2011 article, Loan Mod Program Left Homeowner’s Fate in Hands of Dysfunctional Industry, contained a caption in that said the government’s foreclosure prevention program, HAMP, launched in April 2010. In fact it was launched in April of 2009. .

A Jan. 27, 2011 article, New Documents Show Hedge Fund Magnetar Influenced Deal, Despite Denials, stated that the FCIC quoted e-mails via a letter that had been filed with a court. In fact, they quoted e-mails from a similar letter that hadn’t been filed.

A Jan. 25, 2011 article, Climate Benefits of Natural Gas May Be Overstated, originally misstated that methane, at least 21 times more potent than CO2, is the most potent of greenhouse gases. It should have stated that it is among the more potent greenhouse gases.

A Jan. 3, 2011 article, The Toppling: How the Media Inflated the Fall of Saddam’s Statue in Firdos Square, incorrectly stated that Jan Grarup, a Danish photographer, was on the turret of the first American tank into Firdos Square. The photographer was Markus Matzel, a German.

A Dec. 17, 2010 article, Fannie and Freddie’s Regulator Opposes Reducing Mortgages for Struggling Homeowners, stated that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are Government Sponsored Entities. It should have said they are Government Sponsored Enterprises.

A Dec. 14, 2010 article, Methodology: Chinese Drywall, was corrected to reflect the following: The “Tainted Drywall” news application originally included lists of contractors, manufacturers, distributors, importers and builders involved in lawsuits over tainted drywall. A software bug caused those lists to overstate the number of addresses associated with each company. The erroneous lists, and references to them, have been removed.

A Nov. 29, 2010, story, Another Response to Our Burma Nuclear Story—and Another Answer from Us, was corrected to show that the third point in ProPublica’s letter has been superseded by an earlier clarification that can be found here.

A Nov. 17, 2010, story, Drug Firms Say They’ll Take Closer Look at the Docs They Pay, was corrected after Health News Florida corrected a story we had summarized in our report. Orlando-area urologists Steven Brooks and E. “Jake” Jacobo pleaded guilty on Jan. 12, 2001, to one count of conspiracy to sell the prescription drug Lupron without complying with U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. The Nov. 18 story and our summary mischaracterized the plea.

A Nov. 9, 2010, story, Science Says Methane in Pa. Water Is from Drilling, Not Natural Causes, incorrectly stated that well water had been fouled in northwestern Pennsylvania. The story should have said the water was fouled in northeastern Pennsylvania.

A Nov. 5, 2010, story, Despite Praise From Banks, Treasury, In-House Loan Mods Provide Less Help to Homeowners, incorrectly stated that homeowner Connie Breault had filed for bankruptcy. Breault has considered bankruptcy but has not filed.

A Nov. 2, 2010, story, With All Eyes on the Gulf, BP Alaska Facilities Are Still at Risk, has been corrected to specify that BP’s 2006 shutdown of oil deliveries from the North Slope were from the Prudhoe Bay field, the largest of several distinct production fields there. Also, the shutdown interrupted 4 percent of the nation’s oil supply that comes from U.S. production, not global production.

A Nov. 2, 2010, story, Two Companies Seek Trade Secret Status for Fracking Fluids in Wyoming, stated that ChemEOR was a subsidiary of Flotek Industries Inc. CESI Chemical, not ChemEOR, is a subsidiary of Flotek.

An April 9, 2010, story, The Magnetar Trade, suggested that the hedge fund Magnetar was involved in the naming of “Squared,” a JP Morgan Chase collateralized debt obligation. In a September 30, 2010 letter to ProPublica, Magnetar said it did not name the CDO, and we have corrected the story to remove the suggestion that it did.

Because of an error in data provided by Pfizer, our Dollars for Docs feature incorrectly described William Jeffrey Baker as the principal investigator on a $90,000 research project sponsored by Pfizer. The principal investigator is William L. Baker, Jr.

An Aug. 26, 2010, story,  Banks’ Self-Dealing Super-Charged Financial Crisis, on how investment banks assembled complex securities known as collateralized debt obligations reported that there were 85 instances during 2006 and 2007 in which two CDOs had bought pieces of each others’“unsold” inventory. In fact, there were some instances when this cross-exposure occurred through later transactions. The banks sometimes used such transactions to minimize their own exposure to CDOs they had created.

A Sept. 22, 2010, interactive graphic, CDOs’ Interlocking Ownership, includes at least one example of cross-exposure that did not involve “unsold” inventory. A CDO called Tourmaline III made a sidebet in 2007 that mirrored the performance of a piece of a CDO called Zais Investment Grade 8; that same year Zais 8 bought a piece of Tourmaline III. Both CDOs were underwritten by Deutsche Bank.

The Sept. 23, 2010, post, Frustrated Oil Spill Claimants Consider Alternative Compensation Fund, incorrectly stated that claimants could not receive payments from both Kenneth Feinberg’s operation and the Coast Guard’s National Pollution Funds Center. While claims cannot be paid double, a claimant can seek additional payment from the Coast Guard’s fund if they feel they have been underpaid by Feinberg.

The Sept. 9, 2010, story, Administration Takes Steps That Will Reduce Deportation Risk for Many Undocumented Immigrants, inaccurately said the ICE immigration enforcement program known as Secure Communities was active in 17,553 jurisdictions in 23 states. As of Aug. 31, Secure Communities was active in 574 communities in 30 states.

The Aug. 11, 2010, post, “Primer: Six Things Happening Right Now With Financial Regulation,” has been corrected to indicate that Sens. Dick Lugar, R-Ind., and Benjamin Cardin, D-Md., inserted the provision requiring increased disclosures from oil companies. It had previously stated that two Democratic senators had inserted the measure.

The Aug. 5, 2010, post, Drilling Industry and Gubernatorial Candidates Move To Weaken Some State Regulations, incorrectly said that New Mexico’s pit rules went into effect in May 2008, when the rig count was 79. It should have said that the pit rules went into effect in June 2008, when the rig count was 78. The story also said that the Independent Petroleum Association’s appeal to overturn the rules was filed in the state Oil Conservation Division, when it was actually filed with the First Judicial District Court.

The July 23, 2010, post, Bogus ‘Obama Mom’ Grants Lure Students, incorrectly described the University of Southern California Rossier School of Education as a public school; USC is a private, non-profit university. Also, Golden Gate University is a private, non-profit school; the story initially misidentified it as for-profit.

The July 2, 2010 post, Blast at BP Texas Refinery in ‘05 Foreshadowed Gulf Disaster, said that the Chemicals Safety Board produced a detailed investigation of the 2005 accident. The story should have said that the investigation was produced by the Chemical Safety Board.

The June 9, 2010, post, Top Officer Says Military Takes Brain Injuries ‘Extremely Seriously,’ originally said Gen. Peter Chiarelli was the Army’s second in command. He is in fact the Army’s vice chief of staff.

The May 4, 2010, post, Congressmen Raised Concerns About BP Safety, mistakenly said the 2006 Prudhoe Bay oil spill involved 4,800 gallons of oil. It should have said it involved 4,800 barrels of oil.

The Apr. 28, 2010, post, New Tricks for Those Republican ‘Census’ Mailers, mistakenly said a letter sent to Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele was authored by Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif). The letter was actually written by Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah.

The April 20, 2010, post, Charges Aside, What About Goldman’s Nondisclosure of a Potential Lawsuit?, has been corrected to note that SEC rules do not require disclosure about a pending legal proceeding if the claim for damages does not exceed 10 percent of the company’s overall assets. It had previously said only that the SEC does not require disclosure of a Wells notice.

The April 5, 2010, post, Reporting Network Doc Squad, mistakenly included Delaware and Georgia among the states that currently restrict public records access for people of out of state.

The March 29, 2010, post, Data Show Bank Regulator Goes Easy on Enforcement, has been corrected to remove language calling the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency a “little known bank regulator.”

The March 25, 2010, post, Treasury, Ahem, Clarifies Goals for the Mortgage Mod Program, originally misstated the Treasury official’s estimate of how many homeowners will convert from trial to permanent mods. It said that “Treasury thinks that somewhere between 50 and 66 percent of homeowners in trial mods will fall out,” when the official said that between 50 and 66 percent of those homeowners will convert to a permanent mod.

The March 24, 2010, post, Has Health Care Bickering Blocked Afghan Police Training Inquiry?, originally said that Sen. Mitch McConnell is the Senate majority leader. He is actually the Senate Republican leader.

The Feb. 22, 2010, post, Gas Drillers Plead Guilty to Felony Dumping Violations, originally said that John Morgan was a subcontractor for Swamp Angel Energy.  He should have been identified as the site supervisor. The story also implied that the Swamp Angel well was drilled into the Marcellus Shale. Although the well is located in the Marcellus Shale area, the story should have said that it was drilled into a different geologic formation.

The Feb. 17, 2010, post, Our New List of Stimulus Investigations, originally said that another $333 billion in stimulus funds is in the pipeline to be spent. That figure actually refers to stimulus funds that have been obligated. The amount of money in the pipeline—that is, obligated but not spent—is some $150 billion.

On Feb. 8, 2010, the Transparency Tracker incorrectly reported posting dates later than the actual posting dates of the open sites at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs, Department of the Treasury, Department of the Interior, and the Department of Housing and Urban Development due to a programming error.

The Feb. 7, 2010, post, Administration Signals It Won’t Push Legal Limits of Terrorism Detention, incorrectly stated that the al-Marri decision in the Court of Appeals still stands. In fact, the Supreme Court vacated the decision, thus depriving it of value as a legal precedent.

The Feb. 3, 2010, post, Lobbyists Help Smooth the Way for a Tax Break for Foreign Rum Maker, said Puerto Rico Resident Commissioner Pedro Pierluisi was stepping up his lobbying efforts. It should have said that Puerto Rico Gov. Luis Fortuño was stepping up his lobbying efforts. The post also said that Diageo spent $2.25 million on in-house lobbyists and $770,000 on lobbyists from DLA Piper. It should have said that Diageo spent a total of $2.25 million on lobbying activities in 2009, including $770,000 to DLA Piper.

In the Jan. 26, 2010, post, Judiciary Chairman Conyers to Host Super Bowl Fundraiser, originally said that Rep. John Conyers’ PAC is called “Moving America Forward.” The correct name of Conyers’ PAC is “America Forward Leadership PAC.”

In the Dec. 16, 2009, post Real Student Default Rates Much Higher Than Previously Known, we reported that the Department of Education was projecting that 47 percent of the federal money lent to students at for-profit education institutions in 2007 would never be repaid. We also said that the department had estimated that 40 percent of the money lent to students at for-profit institutions between 2003 and 2006 would be written off. Those statements—a main thrust of the article—are not accurate. Read our note detailing the error.

The headline of the Dec. 7, 2009, post, After Donor’s Letter, Sen. Feinstein Supports Study That Could Delay Fish-Protection Plan, previously said that a study Sen. Feinstein supports is “helping slow down” a fish protection plan. In fact, the plan is already in place. While the study may delay it, it hasn’t yet done so.

Due to poor math by an editor, the headline of the Dec. 5, 2009, post, Bank Failure Friday Roars Back: Six Banks Fail, Costing FDIC $2.6 Billion, misstated the cost to the FDIC. The failures are actually projected to cost the agency about $2.4 billion.

The Nov. 4, 2009, post, More Fun With Stimulus Numbers, originally said that the White House had released a report on stimulus jobs. In fact, the report was released by the Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board, which is an independent government board created by stimulus package. The chairman, Earl Devaney, was appointed by the president.

The Nov. 3, 2009, post, At University of Phoenix, Allegations of Enrollment Abuses Persist, originally stated that the graduation rate of students undertaking associate degrees at the university is 37 percent. In fact, the rate is 27 percent.

The Oct. 28, 2009, post, Grading the Public Options That Already Exist, originally indicated that if veterans did not sign up within five years of discharge, they would not qualify for Veterans health care. In fact, if a veteran qualifies under the VA’s enrollment specifications, they can qualify for care, regardless of how much time has passed since discharge.

The Oct. 20, 2009, post, Medicare Drug Planners Now Lobbyists, With Billions at Stake, originally stated lawmakers and aides crafted the Medicare Part D plan four years ago. It should have said six years ago. The article also said that Billy Tauzin was a former senator in the 29th graph. He was actually a former representative.

The Sept. 22, 2009, post, “Stockholder Suit Targets Troubled Mental Health Chain,” originally stated the Justice Department opened an investigation and the Illinois Department of Children and Families froze admissions of foster children to Riveredge Hospital near Chicago in response to investigations by the Chicago Tribune and ProPublica. It should have said those actions were initiated following the Tribune reports.

The Sept. 21, 2009,  post, Frack Fluid Spill in Dimock Contaminates Stream, Killing Fish, originally included a description of the spill by Vincent Fronda that actually referred to a Sept. 3 discharge near the Cabot well site in question. It was several hundred feet away and separate from the fracturing fluid spill that occurred last Wednesday. The photograph that accompanied the story, which was sent to ProPublica by a Dimock resident, was also of that earlier spill. Both the photo and the descriptive passage have been removed.

The Sept. 11, 2009,  post, StimCities Update: Biden’s Account Clashes with Reality on Ground, originally placed Charlotte, N.C., in the wrong Carolina.

The Sept. 9, 2009,  post, Congressman Announces Plan to Reform U.S. System to Care for Injured Civilian Contractors, originally stated that the study by insurance broker Aon Corp. was released Wednesday, Sept. 9. It was actually released on Friday, Sept. 4, 2009.

The Aug. 18, 2009, posts, Opening the Window on Foreign Lobbying and Adding It Up: The Top Players in Foreign Agent Lobbying, have been corrected. Due to a data entry error, the Foreign Lobbying Influence Tracker contained duplicate entries for fees paid to the Livingston Group by some its clients. The Sunlight Foundation has eliminated the duplicate records, and we have updated related totals in stories and charts about the database.

The Aug. 7, 2009,  post, FBI Raids New Orleans Police Department, originally stated that five people were wounded during the Danziger Bridge incident. In fact, it was four people.

The Aug. 5, 2009, article, Stimulus Spending Fails to Follow Unemployment, Poverty,  inadvertently implied that stimulus spending on tax cuts, increases in unemployment compensation and Medicaid funding were not intended to create or sustain a substantial number of jobs. The article should have made the distinction between “direct” jobs, such as those created by infrastructure funding, and “indirect” jobs. Tax cuts and spending on government benefits do lead to indirect job creation as they contribute to demand for goods and services.

The July 27, 2009, article, Illinois AG: Shady AIDS Charity’s Web Campaign Broke State Law, misstated charges from the state’s complaint against the Center for AIDS Prevention, saying the charity never maintained an office at 4750 N. Broadway in Chicago. The complaint said the charity did not have an office there from at least November 2007 until the filing of the charges.

The April 30, 2009, post, New Arrest Heats Up Pension Kickback Scandal, said that Markstone Capital Group was named in an indictment by New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo regarding fraud in the public pension system. In fact, Markstone was not named in that indictment. Rather, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission sent a letter to Markstone’s founder, Elliott Broidy, as part of the commission’s inquiry into public pension funds. The letter requested financial information relating to Broidy’s time as a commissioner on the Los Angeles Fire and Police Pension fund. In particular, the letter requested details of Broidy’s communications with two firms named in the Cuomo indictment, Aldus Equity and placement agent DAV/Wetherly Financial. Broidy resigned from the LA pension board after the SEC’s inquiry was publicly disclosed.

The July 19, 2009, post, Introducing Stimulus Spot Check, originally said ProPublica is looking at a random sample of about 500 bridge construction projects nationwide. We’re actually looking at a sample of about 500 road and bridge projects.

The July 17, 2009,  post, On Stimulus Job Counts, California Goes Its Own Way, incorrectly stated the base cost of improving as $739,014. It’s actually $739,014,000.

A caption on the July 14, 2009, post, “Disappearance of Privacy Board From White House Web Site Raises Questions,” previously suggested 9/11 Commission chairman Thomas Kean said the Whitehouse.gov’s deletion of the reference to the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board was “extremely disappointing.”  In fact, Kean was referring to administration’s overall lack of progress staffing the board.

The July 13, 2009,  post, “Schwarzenegger Replaces Most of State Nursing Board,” incorrectly referred to former Board of Registered Nursing vice president Elizabeth O. Dietz as a professor of nursing at San Jose State. Although the board’s web site lists that as her current affiliation, the university said she retired in July 2008.

The July 10, 2009,  post, Gov’t Foreclosure Program: Who Are The Holdouts?, incorrectly stated that Acorn Housing organized the campaign against four non-participants. In fact, it was ACORN, the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now.

The July 9, 2009,  post, Today’s Stimulus Debate: City vs. Country , incorrectly cited the Philadelphia Enquirer. In fact, the newspaper is called the Philadelphia Inquirer.

The July 8, 2009,  post, GAO Slams Flimsy Auditing Rules for Stimulus Dollars, inaccurately stated that the deadline for states to begin audits of their stimulus spending is at least six months after the end of the fiscal year. In fact, the deadline is nine months after the end of the fiscal year.

The June 30, 2009,  post, After Call From Senator Inouye’s Office, Small Hawaii Bank Got U.S. Aid, inaccurately said that Rep. Maxine Waters arranged a meeting between regulators and OneUnited of Massachusetts. She actually arranged a meeting between regulators and the National Bankers Association, whose chairman was the general counsel of OneUnited. A person at the meeting said the discussion focused on OneUnited.

The June 23, 2009,  post, Madoff Client Jeffry Picower Netted $5 Billion—Likely More Than Madoff Himself, originally stated that the Picower foundation gave out a little under $207 million in donations from 1995 to 2008. The foundation actually doled out more than $235 million in donations.

The June 16, 2009,  post, Business Jet Group Tries to Block FOIA Request, originally misstated the name of the BARR Program as “Blocked Aircraft Registration Request.” BARR stands for “Block Aircraft Registration Request.”

The June 12, 2009,  post, Stimulus Threatens to Cause ‘Full-Blown Trade War,’ mistakenly stated that Associated General Contractors represents 7 million workers. It represents construction companies whose workforce numbers about 7 million.

The May 20, 2009,  post, Deficit Skyrockets at Pension Guaranty Fund, mistakenly stated the PBGC’s deficit as $35 billion. It is $33.5 billion.

The April 30, 2009,  post, Decoder: The Pension Fund Scandal, mistakenly stated that the California State Teachers’ Retirement System had moved to limit campaign contributions to members of its oversight board but had been thwarted in a legal challenge. We should have said it was the California Public Employees Retirement System that attempted to limit contributions.

The April 9, 2009,  post, Catch-22: Can AIG Repay Taxpayers?, originally stated that AIG “ditched plans” to sell two of its insurance subsidiaries, Alico and AIA. In fact, AIG says selling the companies is still an option in its effort to repay federal bailout loans. The company’s plans did change insofar as AIG gave the Federal Reserve Bank ownership interest in the two subsidiaries in return for a $26 billion reduction in the amount owed to the Fed. The company is now considering a wider ranch of options than simply selling the subsidiaries. The original post also stated that the transaction resulted in an additional loan to AIG. In fact, the additional $30 billion lending facility, announced on the same day, came from the Treasury, not the Fed. AIG has not yet tapped that line of credit, according to spokeswoman Christina Pretto.

The March 12, 2009,  post,  Talking With the Former FOIA Czar, originally stated former Justice Dept. FOIA official Dan Metcalfe was a “Reagan appointee.” In fact, he was appointed to head the Office of Information and Privacy during the Reagan administration but was already working at the Justice Department.

Photo by flickr user sparkieblues http://www.flickr.com/photos/sparkieblues/3971258497/

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