Some of the best #MuckReads we read this week. Want to receive these by email?  Sign up to get this briefing delivered to your inbox every weekend.

Freddie Gray among many suspects who do not get medical care from Baltimore police (The Baltimore Sun)

"From June 2012 through April 2015, correctional officers at the Baltimore City Detention Center have  refused to admit nearly 2,600 detainees who were in police custody... 'It goes to demonstrate the callous indifference the officers show when they are involved with the public,' said attorney A. Dwight Pettit, who has sued dozens of city officers in the past 40 years. 'Why would they render medical care when they rendered many of the injuries on the people?'"

Breaking Baltimore's blue wall of silence (BuzzFeed News)

"...he witnessed an off-duty cop brutally beat a handcuffed suspect, saw a detective cover it up with a police report full of lies, and watched his sergeant approve the whole thing. Crystal was supposed to keep his mouth shut about what he saw, but he didn't. He broke the 'blue wall of silence' and blew the whistle on his colleagues... The harassment and the threats followed."

Why can't America have great trains? (National Journal)

A timely report in light of this week's deadly Amtrak derailment and news that the track lacked the latest safety equipment: "...despite this outpouring of popular demand, despite the clear environmental benefits of rail travel, despite the fact that trains can help relieve urban congestion, despite the professed enthusiasm of the Obama administration (and especially rail fan-in-chief, Joe Biden) for high-speed trains... [Amtrak] remains on a seemingly permanent path to mediocrity."

Push to end prison rapes loses momentum (The New York Times)

"In fact, the ambitious goal to audit every prison, jail, detention center, lockup and halfway house in this country over a three-year period is far behind schedule. Some 8,000 institutions are supposed to be audited for sexual safety by August 2016, but only 335 audits had been completed by March, according to a Justice Department document obtained from the office of Senator John Cornyn of Texas; the department declined to provide numbers."

Doubly vulnerable (The Democrat & Chronicle)

"....parents of Latino students with disabilities point to serious systemic flaws in the way the Rochester School District educates that population. ... Students' special education plans (individualized education plans, or IEPs) are sometimes developed in meetings without qualified interpreters, leading to serious omissions. Those IEPs are then often ignored and parents' complaints are dismissed, with responses coming in English, if at all."

Money as a weapon system: How U.S. commanders spent $2 billion of petty cash in Afghanistan (ProPublica)

"Some projects were 'cancelled due to lack of community need'--like the plan to supply the Afghan Olympic director with 200 volleyballs, 500 pairs of shoes and other equipment."