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Alabama's Meth Lab Law, Abortion Rights and the Strange Case of Jane Doe

After a woman is jailed for exposing her fetus to drugs, county officials refuse to release her for an abortion and ask a judge to strip her of parental rights.
The FBI Built a Database That Can Catch Rapists — Almost Nobody Uses It
School Segregation, the Continuing Tragedy of Ferguson
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Has Your Health Professional Received Drug Company Money?

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What ProPublica is Doing About Diversity

ProPublica is working hard to increase the diversity of our workplace. Here’s what we’re up to.

Georgia is Segregating Troublesome Kids in Schools Used During Jim Crow

A Department of Justice investigation found that Georgia is giving thousands of kids with behavioral issues a subpar education and putting them in the same run-down buildings that served black children decades ago.

Editor’s Note: ‘Dr. Abscess’ and Why Surgeon Scorecard Matters

Critics claim our analysis of surgical complications is flawed. We disagree. For the first time, patients can see a surgeon’s record – and use it to help make their best choice.

Photos: Baltimore in the Wake of Freddie Gray

In the tumult following Freddie Gray’s death, a young photographer documented life in a city under siege.

FDA Examines Whether MRI Drugs Accumulate in Brain Tissue

The agency says doctors should consider limiting MRIs to reduce exposure from certain image-enhancing drugs that contain the metal gadolinium.

Senator to Red Cross: Where’s the Transparency on Haiti?

“I still have a lot more questions for the Red Cross,” said Sen. Charles Grassley.

Judges Revive Claim that AT&T Overcharged Schools for Internet Service

A lawsuit can proceed against the company for allegedly failing to offer the required discounts to schools and libraries, says an appeals court.

When It Comes to Patient Safety, There’s A Problem. ProPublica’s Patient Safety Chat Recap

On Friday at 11 a.m. EST, spinal surgeon Dr. Charles Mick and the ProPublica reporters on #SurgeonScorecard will take your questions about patient safety.

Road Hazard: How the ‘Embarrassing’ Gas Tax Impasse Explains Washington

The main federal fund for roads and bridges runs at a deep deficit. If even red states can raise the gas tax, why can’t Congress?

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Killing the Colorado

The Colorado River is dying – the victim of legally sanctioned overuse, the relentless forces of urban growth, willful ignorance among policymakers and a misplaced confidence in human ingenuity. ProPublica investigates the policies that are putting this precious resource in peril.

9 Stories in the Series. Latest:

Less Than Zero

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Editor’s Note: ‘Dr. Abscess’ and Why Surgeon Scorecard Matters

Editor’s Note: ‘Dr. Abscess’ and Why Surgeon Scorecard Matters

Critics claim our analysis of surgical complications is flawed. We disagree. For the first time, patients can see a surgeon’s record – and use it to help make their best choice.

See entire series

Insult to Injury

Driven by big business and insurers, states nationwide are dismantling workers’ compensation, slashing benefits to injured workers and making it more difficult for them to get care. Meanwhile employers are paying the lowest rates for workers’ comp insurance since the 1970s.

13 Stories in the Series. Latest:

Injured Worker in ProPublica/NPR Story Testifies Before Illinois Legislature

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Senator to Red Cross: Where’s the Transparency on Haiti?

Senator to Red Cross: Where’s the Transparency on Haiti?

“I still have a lot more questions for the Red Cross,” said Sen. Charles Grassley.

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Level 14

How a home for troubled children came undone and what it means for California’s chance at reform.

9 Stories in the Series. Latest:

In Rare Step, Workers at California Group Home Unionize

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Unforgiven

The way lenders and collectors pursue consumer debt has undergone an aggressive transformation in America. Collectors today don’t give up easy, often pursuing debts for years. It’s now routine for companies to sue debtors, then seize their wages or the cash in their bank accounts. For many people, these changes have profoundly affected their lives.

13 Stories in the Series. Latest:

Senator to Hospitals: Stop Suing Poor Patients

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