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Oregon Board Says Those Found Criminally Insane Rarely Commit New Crimes. The Numbers Say Otherwise.

The Psychiatric Security Review Board questioned how many people it discharged from state custody returned to crime. But it did not share its findings or change policies even as former clients killed or raped.

What Oregon Officials Knew and When They Knew It

Members of the Psychiatric Security Review Board have said it is not their duty to track what happens to people they set free. But in private, board members and staff pushed to study recidivism and found high rates among people the board frees.

Century-Old West Virginia Leases Yield Paltry Gas Royalties. A Suit Could Cut Others’ Payouts to a Trickle, Too.

Energy giant EQT is challenging a 36-year-old law that gives residents a bigger share of natural gas profits at a time when the industry is flourishing.

An Emoluments Suit Against Trump Is Moving Ahead. We Spoke to a Plaintiff About What’s Next. — “Trump, Inc.” Podcast Extra

We interview the District of Columbia Attorney General Karl Racine about the suit, what it might uncover and why the Founding Fathers put the Emoluments Clause in the Constitution.

Top Chicago Alderman Adds to Growing Momentum for Ticket and Debt Reform

The proposal, the latest in a series of reforms aiming to respond to growing public pressure, would make it easier for motorists to avoid having their driver’s licenses suspended.

Diversion Programs Say They Offer a Path Away From Court, but Critics Say the Tolls Are Hefty

The programs raise legal and ethical questions, including whether they create an uneven playing field for defendants and financial incentives for prosecutors to dispose of cases in ways they might not otherwise.

West Virginia’s Natural Gas Industry Keeps Pushing to Whittle Away Payments to Residents

Companies are deducting “post-production” costs or creating shell companies to reduce royalty payments. The firms say they have done nothing wrong.

“Documenting Hate: New American Nazis,” Coming Soon From ProPublica and Frontline

We investigate a neo-Nazi group that has actively recruited inside the U.S. military. Sign up for our newsletter and we’ll send it to you when it’s live.

Why Jeff Sessions’ Final Act Could Have More Impact Than Expected

Just before he left, the departing attorney-general adopted a policy to limit the Justice Department’s ability to oversee abusive police departments. That same policy could also hamper the department’s role in environmental, voting-rights, and other cases.

Election Day Was Filled With Frustrations, Claims of Mischief and Glimmers of Hope

Some states had ballot measures aimed at making it easier to vote or designed to take some of the politics out of how electoral districts are drawn up. In nearly every case, Americans seized the opportunity — with what the vote totals suggest was enthusiasm.

El extraño caso de los diplomáticos estadounidenses en Cuba: el misterio se intensifica y las divisiones en Washington también

Funcionarios de la administración Trump insisten que los americanos fueron atacados, aunque las pruebas no aparecen. “La cosa de Cuba es uno de los pocos misterios no resueltos que tenemos,” dijo un oficial.

The Strange Case of American Diplomats in Cuba: As the Mystery Deepens, So Do Divisions in Washington

Trump officials insist the Americans were attacked, even as the evidence fails to materialize. “The Cuba thing is one of the few unsolved mysteries we’ve got,” an official said.

The Election Is Over. And Now the Next Elections Begin.

After Tuesday’s bluebath, Democrats dominate. But what comes next?

So What Trump Investigations Could Be Coming? — “Trump, Inc.” Podcast Extra

The “Trump, Inc.” team sat down with the New Yorker’s Adam Davidson, McClatchy’s Anita Kumar and the Washington Post’s David Fahrenthold to talk about the midterms and how we might learn more about President Donald Trump’s businesses.

Aging Machines, Crowds, Humidity: Problems at the Polls Were Mundane but Widespread

Instead of fireworks from voter intimidation or cyberattacks, Americans grappled with the mundane frustrations of using dated equipment to vote in huge numbers.

Missouri Changed Voter ID Requirements, Citing Confusion. Yet on Election Day, There Was Confusion.

Many reported that they were told they didn’t have valid photo identification, and the situation was a result of a court ruling that allowed Missourians to cast ballots with a range of forms of ID.

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