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Jeff Gerth

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Jeff Gerth is a senior reporter at ProPublica. Previously, he worked as an investigative reporter at The New York Times from 1976 through 2005. His work has twice been honored with the Pulitzer Prize. He also won a George Polk Award. His often-prescient coverage has run the gamut from Al Qaeda to Enron, from Whitewater to Chinese technology transfers. During 2004 he was a visiting professor at Princeton University, where he taught an undergraduate seminar on investigative reporting. Gerth is also the co-author (with Don Van Natta Jr.), of Her Way: The Hopes and Ambitions of Hillary Rodham Clinton, published in 2007.

Articles

Hillary Clinton’s Mixed Record on Wall Street Belies Her Tough ‘Cut it Out’ Talk

As a U.S. senator during the crisis years, Clinton’s legislative proposals to reform banking and housing finance didn’t gain traction.

Johnson & Johnson Emerges Victorious in Lawsuit on Tylenol’s Risks

Hundreds of cases are pending that involve claims that Tylenol has caused liver damage and deaths. The pain reliever’s maker won a jury verdict in the first.

New Trial Records: Doctors Recommended Tylenol — But Only at Lower Doses

Internal company documents that have emerged in a New Jersey trial make clear that marketing for Tylenol did not convey doctors’ concerns about its risks.

New Court Docs: Maker of Tylenol Had a Plan to Block Tougher Regulation

Filings from a lawsuit, scheduled to go to trial today in Atlantic City, describe a previously unreported lobbying campaign by McNeil Consumer Healthcare to protect its iconic painkiller.

After Years of Study, the FDA Endorses Safety Device for Liquid Children’s Medications

Flow restrictors can help prevent children from taking too much acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, which can cause liver damage if taken in high doses.

FDA Examines Whether MRI Drugs Accumulate in Brain Tissue

The agency says doctors should consider limiting MRIs to reduce exposure from certain image-enhancing drugs that contain the metal gadolinium.

Judges Revive Claim that AT&T Overcharged Schools for Internet Service

A lawsuit can proceed against the company for allegedly failing to offer the required discounts to schools and libraries, says an appeals court.

How Much Acetaminophen a Day is Safe? Canada May Decide It’s Less

After an investigation by the Toronto Star, Canada’s top health agency considers whether to lower the maximum recommended daily dose of the active ingredient in Tylenol and other painkillers.

Left in the Brain: Potentially Toxic Residue from MRI Drugs

Researchers raise alarms about unknown health risks of GE’s Omniscan and Bayer’s Magnevist, drugs injected to get better MRI pictures that contain the heavy metal gadolinium.

Overuse, Safety Questions Cloud Advair’s Ascent to Asthma Blockbuster

Millions of Americans use GlaxoSmithKline's purple inhaler. But whether Advair poses a higher risk of asthma-related death remains uncertain 15 years after regulators approved the drug.

Private Emails Reveal Ex-Clinton Aide’s Secret Spy Network

Emails disclosed by a hacker show a close family friend was funneling intelligence about the crisis in Libya directly to the Secretary of State’s private account starting before the Benghazi attack.

Hillary Clinton’s Top Five Clashes Over Secrecy

The latest flap over her private emails as secretary of state is far from the first time she's been accused of lacking transparency.

Echoes of Hillary’s Past as Emails Put Her on Defensive

Hillary Clinton defense of her use of personal emails while Secretary of State triggers memories of the ‘pink press conference’ during the Whitewater investigation.

In Private Papers, A More Candid Tim Geithner Speaks Out

The former Treasury secretary and architect of the Obama administration's financial rescue sounds more like some of his detractors in papers that were never meant to be public.

All the Things Hillary Clinton’s Book Doesn’t Say About Iraq

In “Hard Choices,” the former secretary of state ignores or glosses over key aspects of her record on Iraq—including State Department responsibility for the country’s security assistance.

Geithner Book: ‘I Should Have Paid More Attention’ to Citigroup’s Woes

The former treasury secretary says his close ties to ex-Citi executive Robert Rubin ‘tempered my skepticism’ about the bank’s health in the years before the financial crisis hit.

FDA Opens Review of Rules for Over-the-Counter Drugs, Including Acetaminophen

Federal regulators’ announcement that they will examine the regulation of non-prescription drugs such as acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, follows a ProPublica investigation.

Over-The-Counter Pills Left Out of FDA Acetaminophen Limits

Federal drug regulators are moving to enforce a ban on prescription drugs with more than 325 milligrams of acetaminophen. But you’ll still be able to buy pills that contain up to twice that dose over-the-counter at the gas station or grocery store.

The Fix Isn’t In: Why a Safety Device That Can Stop Overdoses by Kids Isn’t Widely Used

Safety valves that cost pennies per bottle could save thousands of kids from being rushed to emergency rooms each year. A doctor has campaigned to have the devices added to all liquid medicines, but so far he’s had limited success.

Tylenol’s Risks Not Fully Understood, Poll Shows

Most Americans know that overdosing can be dangerous but many wrongly think it’s safe to mix drugs containing acetaminophen, a nationwide poll found.

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