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Head of Rhode Island’s 911 System Is Removed From Post

The move came after The Public’s Radio sought verification of Gregory M. Scungio’s Red Cross certifications, and state police learned that he had been training call takers in CPR without proper certification.

The E-911 center at the Rhode Island State Police in Scituate, Rhode Island. (Lynn Arditi, The Public's Radio)

This article was produced in partnership with The Public’s Radio, which is a member of the ProPublica Local Reporting Network.

The acting director of Rhode Island’s 911 emergency system has been removed from his post after state police learned he’d been training 911 call takers in CPR without proper certification.

The revelation came less than 48 hours after The Public’s Radio requested verification of Gregory M. Scungio’s Red Cross certifications in an email to Rhode Island State Police. The inquiry was part of an ongoing examination of emergency medical services in Rhode Island, in conjunction with ProPublica’s Local Reporting Network.

Col. James Manni, who took over as superintendent of the agency last month, said in a statement released Wednesday night that Scungio’s certification from the Red Cross to teach basic first aid and CPR and to operate an automated external defibrillator, also known as an AED, expired in February 2016. Any employees Scungio trained since then do not have valid certification.

A spokesperson for the state police said the agency plans to properly certify all 32 of the center’s call takers and eight managers by next Wednesday.

Rhode Island State Police Lt. Michael McGlynn will take over as acting director of 911.

Scungio has been reassigned to another position. He did not reply to an email seeking comment.

Lynn Arditi is a health reporter for The Public’s Radio in Providence, Rhode Island. Email her at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter at @LynnArditi.

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