Bernice Yeung

Bernice Yeung covers business with a focus on labor and employment for ProPublica. Previously, she was a reporter with Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting where her work examined issues related to violence against women, immigration, environmental health and the workplace.

She was a member of the national Emmy-nominated Rape in the Fields reporting team, which investigated the sexual assault of immigrant farmworkers. The project won an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award and was a finalist for the Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting. Yeung also was the lead reporter for the national Emmy-nominated Rape on the Night Shift team, which examined sexual violence against female janitors. That work won an Investigative Reporters and Editors Award, the Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi Award for investigative journalism, and the Third Coast/Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Competition. Those projects led to her first book, In a Day's Work: The Fight to End Sexual Violence Against America's Most Vulnerable Workers (The New Press, 2018).

Austin Police Department Orders Deeper Investigation After Audit Finds It Misclassified Cleared Rape Cases

The APD will ask a third party to examine how it handles rape investigations. The police chief also announced he had ordered other changes, including the addition of another supervisor to the sex crimes unit and new policies for clearing crimes.

Audit Finds Austin, Texas, Improperly Cleared Rapes

A review prompted by an investigation by Newsy, Reveal and ProPublica shows that the Police Department misclassified cases in a way that made its rate of solving them appear higher.

Austin Closes A High Number Of Its Rape Cases Without Arrests. The State’s Investigating Why.

Austin Mayor Steve Adler said the issue was “worthy of immediate attention” in the wake of an investigation by Newsy, Reveal and ProPublica.

FBI Moves to Fix Critical Flaw in Its Crime Reporting System

In response to an investigation by Newsy, Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting and ProPublica, the bureau says it has expedited a process expected to change reporting rules and require police to disclose cases they classify as unfounded.

When It Comes to Rape, Just Because a Case Is Cleared Doesn’t Mean It’s Solved

Some police departments, turning to a designation that’s supposed to be used sparingly, make it seem as though they’ve solved a significant number of rape cases when they have simply closed them.

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