Ian MacDougall

Contributing Reporter

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A lawyer as well as a journalist, he has written about crime, criminal justice and legal affairs for Harper’s, The Atlantic, Slate, The Guardian and n+1. Prior to attending law school, he was an Associated Press reporter, with stints in the Oslo, Norway, and Providence, Rhode Island, bureaus.

“Cover Up”: House Democrats Subpoena Documents That NLRB Refused to Share in Ethics Investigation

A committee chair is ratcheting up a fight over an investigation into potential conflicts of interests in the NLRB’s repeated efforts to undo an Obama-era rule that expanded liability for corporations like McDonald’s.

How McKinsey Is Making $100 Million (and Counting) Advising on the Government’s Bumbling Coronavirus Response

For the world’s best-known corporate-management consultants, helping tackle the pandemic has been a bonanza. It’s not clear what the government has gotten in return.

Bill Barr Promised to Release Prisoners Threatened by Coronavirus — Even as the Feds Secretly Made It Harder for Them to Get Out

Celebrity prisoners like former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort have been granted home detention, but a secret Bureau of Prisons policy has kept all but 1.8% of federal inmates behind bars, where the virus rages.

“I Do Not Want to Die in Here”: Letters From the Houston Jail

A series of letters from detainees in one of America’s largest jails reveals the mounting dread and uncertainty as the coronavirus spreads inside the 7,500-inmate facility.

McKinsey Called Our Story About Its ICE Contract False. It’s Not.

The consulting giant asserts our story “misleads readers” and “disregards facts” — but its statement mischaracterizes what’s in the article, ignores hundreds of pages of proof we shared with the firm and provides no evidence to back its claims.

How McKinsey Makes Its Own Rules

The consulting giant, which likes to compare itself to the Marines and the Catholic Church, has a habit of disregarding rules and norms in its government work.

New York City Paid McKinsey Millions to Stem Jail Violence. Instead, Violence Soared.

The corporate consulting firm reported bogus numbers and flailed in a project at Rikers Island. Today, assaults and other attacks there are up almost 50%.

How McKinsey Helped the Trump Administration Detain and Deport Immigrants

Newly uncovered documents show the consulting giant helped ICE find “detention savings opportunities” — including some that the agency’s staff viewed as too harsh on immigrants.

Did Rudy Giuliani Nullify His Attorney-Client Protections?

Sometimes he says he’s acting as President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer — and sometimes he says he’s not. That could cost him a key legal shield and force him to cooperate with the House impeachment inquiry.

Trump’s NLRB, Trying to Cut Protections for Millions of Temps and Fast-Food Workers, Trips Up Again

The labor-relations board’s attempt to kill an Obama rule protecting third-party employees fizzled once because of a conflict of interest. Now, two representatives charge, there’s a new conflict and it involves the agency’s own use of temps.

Soon You May Not Even Have to Click on a Website Contract to Be Bound by Its Terms

A private and influential legal group you’ve never heard of is about to vote on what critics call a fundamental rollback of consumer rights.

The Country That Exiled McKinsey

A dubious project raises serious questions about the world’s most prestigious consulting firm and its work for corruption-plagued regimes.

Why Jeff Sessions’ Final Act Could Have More Impact Than Expected

Just before he left, the departing attorney-general adopted a policy to limit the Justice Department’s ability to oversee abusive police departments. That same policy could also hamper the department’s role in environmental, voting-rights, and other cases.

Aging Machines, Crowds, Humidity: Problems at the Polls Were Mundane but Widespread

Instead of fireworks from voter intimidation or cyberattacks, Americans grappled with the mundane frustrations of using dated equipment to vote in huge numbers.

What Went Wrong at New York City Polling Places? It Was Something in the Air. Literally.

There was almost 100 percent humidity and unusually high precipitation in the five boroughs, not exactly perfect for a widely used ballot scanner. According to its technical documents, the scanner becomes downright uncomfortable when the weather turns sweaty.

Long Lines Test Voter Patience Across the Nation

With waits at polling places sometimes exceeding an hour, some voters turn away as poll workers wrestle with malfunctioning equipment and overflow crowds.

How the Trump Administration Went Easy on Small-Town Police Abuses

The Obama Justice Department thought Ville Platte, Louisiana — where officers jail witnesses to crimes — could become a model of how to erase policing abuses that plague small towns across the nation. Jeff Sessions decided not to bother.

What’s Your Experience With the Americans With Disabilities Act? We Want to Know.

We want to know how the law affects you, whether you’re a person with a disability, caretaker, business owner, architect or contractor.

Why the IRS’ Recent Dark Money Decision May Be Less Dire Than It Seems

With the tax agency already “toothless” on political cases, how much difference does it make if it’s now “deaf and blind,” too?

Who Is Brett Kavanaugh? A Supreme Court Reading Guide

President Trump proposed a replacement for retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. Here, the best reporting to date on the Supreme Court nominee.

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