Joseph Singer

Video Editor

Joe Singer, a video editor at ProPublica, is an award-winning film professional who partners with ProPublica’s journalists to create documentaries telling the stories of their penetrating investigations.

Singer’s work at ProPublica has included the feature documentary “Unprotected,” a story of rape and corruption at an acclaimed American charity in Liberia and winner of the 2019 Edward R. Murrow award for Best News Documentary. As an editor, Singer draws upon hands-on experience in all film disciplines — from producing, directing and screenwriting to editing and animating — to craft unique video stories that extend ProPublica’s impact.

Before he joined ProPublica, Singer’s projects included editing the Oscar-nominated documentary “Knife Skills” (2018) and Human Rights Watch’s Peabody Award-winning documentary “Gold’s Costly Dividend” (2012) and Webby Award-winning mini-documentary “Dear Obama: A Message from Victims of the LRA” (2011). Singer co-wrote and edited the feature documentary “8 Borders, 8 Days” (2017), the story of a single-mother Syrian refugee who desperately makes a smuggler’s-raft journey from Turkey to Europe with her two small children, which was screened by such organizations as Amnesty International.

Early in his career, Singer worked as an animator and director at Walt Disney Studios, where his projects included “How Things Werk,” for which he received an Emmy nomination. Singer has an MFA in film production from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts and a BA in design from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Rescuing Her Father From an Assisted Living Facility in the Coronavirus Epicenter

The home’s administrator assured her that her 82-year-old father was safe, she said. Then she found out the coronavirus was tearing through the facility — and her dad had caught it.

Inside an Immigration Detention Facility as the Coronavirus Spreads

At an ICE detention facility in New Jersey, detainees are on a hunger strike to try to obtain soap and toilet paper in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

Adrift: How the Marine Corps Failed Squadron 242

Falling from 15,000 feet, two Marines hit the Pacific Ocean at 800 feet per minute. They were bruised and cold, their rescue equipment failed and help was hours away.

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