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Megan Rose

Reporter

Photo of Megan Rose

Megan Rose, formerly Megan McCloskey, covers the military for ProPublica. Previously she was the national correspondent at Stars and Stripes. She reported from several conflict and disaster zones, including Iraq, Afghanistan and Haiti, and covered military operations in the Pacific. Her three-part series on a family’s struggle with the Department of Veterans Affairs to care for their severely wounded son was a finalist for a Livingston Award and ASNE’s Distinguished Writing Award for Nondeadline writing. And her investigative work about military suicides has been cited by members of Congress. Prior to Stars and Stripes, Rose was a reporter for the Las Vegas Sun covering the economy and national politics. She’s been an editor on the AP’s Asia desk in Bangkok, wrote about state and national news for AP’s Denver bureau, and covered religion for the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Rose graduated from the University of Missouri with bachelor’s degrees in journalism and political science.

The Freedom Plea: How Prosecutors Deny Exonerations by Dangling the Prison Keys

New evidence pointed to innocence in the cases of these four Baltimore men, yet prosecutors would only let them go if they agreed to controversial plea deals.

What Does an Innocent Man Have to Do to Go Free? Plead Guilty.

A case in Baltimore — in which two men were convicted of the same murder and cleared by DNA 20 years later — shows how far prosecutors will go to preserve a conviction.

Nevada Passes Modest Measures to Curb Prosecutorial Misconduct

Lobbying by prosecutors and police guts law that would have punished prosecutors who didn’t share evidence with defense. Debate cited case of Fred Steese, subject of ProPublica and Vanity Fair story.

Kafka in Vegas

Fred Steese served more than 20 years in prison for the murder of a Vegas showman even though evidence in the prosecution’s files proved he didn’t do it. But when the truth came to light, he was offered a confounding deal known as an Alford plea. If he took it he could go free, but he’d remain a convicted killer.

Our Military Waste Game Suddenly Seems Prophetic

With Trump pushing to give the U.S. military another $52 billion, a game we built two years ago to put the billions wasted in Afghanistan in perspective seems particularly relevant.

Even Suspended Ban Puts Iraqi Interpreter’s Carefully Built American Dream At Risk

An interpreter risked his life working for the U.S. Marines. Now, after eight years in the U.S., his Michigan export business is suffering because it's too risky to leave the country.

Lawmakers to Pentagon: Goats, Carpets and Jewelry Helped Afghanistan How?

At a Senate hearing this week, lawmakers questioned whether a Pentagon business task force had accomplished anything worthwhile.

Afghanistan Waste Exhibit A: Kajaki Dam, More Than $300M Spent and Still Not Done

A Senate subcommittee is looking at waste by a Pentagon task force. It would do well to review the reasons why a major hydroelectric power plant sits unfinished.

The U.S. Spent a Half Billion on Mining in Afghanistan With ‘Limited Progress’

The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction has labelled yet another project in danger of failing. This time its U.S. plans to develop the country’s oil, gas and minerals industries.

We Blew $17 Billion in Afghanistan. How Would You Have Spent It?

The U.S. government has wasted billions of dollars in Afghanistan, and until now, no one has added it all up. Project after project blundered ahead ignoring history, culture and warnings of failure. And Congress has barely blinked as the financial toll has mounted. Here’s just what the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction found. See for yourself how that money could have been used at home.

Pentagon Task Force: We Want Villas and Flat-Screen TVs in Afghanistan

In its latest salvo, the inspector general dings the controversial task force for spending $150 million on private housing in Afghanistan, including fancy meals and round-the-clock bodyguards.

Plot Thickens: Pentagon Now Facing More Scrutiny Over $766 Million Task Force

Senators were already questioning why the Defense Department was restricting a government watchdog. Now there are criminal investigations and questions about retaliation against a whistleblower.

Watchdog Accuses Pentagon of Evading Questions on $800 Million Afghanistan Program

Despite lacking access to key documents and personnel, the inspector general determined that nearly $43 million had been spent on a natural gas station that should have cost closer to $300,000.

Taxpayers Fund Yet Another Unneeded Building in Afghanistan

The U.S. military shelled out millions before deciding the project was unnecessary, bringing the total for unused buildings spotted by the Inspector General for Afghanistan to nearly $42 million.

The Military Built Another Multimillion-Dollar Building in Afghanistan That No One Used

In its latest report, the inspector general found that the U.S. military continued to build a $14.7 million warehouse after it knew it wasn’t needed, echoing an earlier investigation into an unused $25 million HQ.

Behavior of Military Lawyer in Boondoggle HQ Inquiry Under Scrutiny

Several U.S. Senators and military lawyers say they are concerned by Col. Norm Allen’s attempts to thwart an investigation into why the U.S. Military built an unneeded luxury headquarters in Afghanistan.

Boondoggle HQ

The $25 Million Building in Afghanistan Nobody Needed

Money as a Weapons System

How U.S. commanders spent $2 billion of petty cash in Afghanistan

Billions Blown in Afghanistan Reconstruction Spending? (MuckReads Edition)

A Muckreads roundup cataloging the U.S. government’s financial waste in Afghanistan.

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