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Sisi Wei

Deputy News Applications Editor

Photo of Sisi Wei

Sisi Wei is an investigative journalist, designer and developer at ProPublica, where she builds interactive stories that serve the public interest. Her work has ranged from investigating which U.S. colleges saddle students with debt to monitoring how often China blocks international news outlets. Sisi has won numerous Malofiej, SND Digital and ONA awards, the Gannett Award for Innovation in Watchdog Journalism, and the 2016 Data Journalism Award for Best Individual Portfolio. She has served as an adjunct professor at New York University, The New School and CUNY, and she is also the co-founder of Code with me, a high-impact, nonprofit workshop that teaches journalists how to code. Sisi previously worked at the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal and the Associated Press.

Currently, Sisi is also researching and developing games for journalism. She has published multiple articles, teaches a course and gives talks on how to use games to tell stories. She has been cited many times in research and reports on the current state of newsgames.

Contact: PGP Key

Nonprofit Explorer

We’ve updated our Nonprofit Explorer app with over 600,000 new tax filings from FY2013. Use the database to search over 1.8 million tax returns from tax-exempt organizations.

Surgeon Scorecard

We calculated complication rates for surgeons performing one of eight elective procedures under Medicare, carefully adjusting for differences in patient health, age and hospital quality. Use this database to know more about a surgeon before your operation.

Money as a Weapons System

How U.S. commanders spent $2 billion of petty cash in Afghanistan

Employers Complain of Rising Premiums, But Workers’ Comp Is at 25-Year Low

Despite the drumbeat of complaints about costs, employers are paying the lowest rates for workers’ compensation insurance than at any time in the past 25 years, even as the costs of health care have increased dramatically.

Over 1,100 Health Data Breaches, but Few Fines

Since October 2009, health care organizations and their business partners reported 1,142 large-scale data breaches, each affecting at least 500 people, to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Of those, seven breaches have resulted in fines.

Internet Censorship in China: We’ll Sing it for You

One Chinese government agency is so proud of how well they censor the Internet that they put their feelings to music.

The Human Toll of Flashbangs

At least 50 Americans have been seriously injured, maimed or killed by flashbangs since 2000. Here are their stories.

Inside the Firewall: Tracking the News That China Blocks

Every day since Nov. 17, 2014, ProPublica has been testing whether the homepages of international news organizations are accessible to browsers inside China. Of the 18 in our test, 0 are currently blocked. Below are the results. To test, we use GreatFire.org, a censorship monitoring service in China that launched in 2011.

Timeline: The Tortured History of the Senate’s Torture Report

It has been more than five years since the Senate began investigating the CIA’s detainee program, a period marked by White House indecisiveness, Republican opposition, and what we now know was CIA snooping.

How to Ask Programming Questions

A guide to getting your programming questions answered on the Internet.

U.S. Company Helps Russia Block Prominent Putin Critic

The U.S. blogging company LiveJournal is showing an error message to users inside Russia who try to read the blog of Alexei Navalny, a prominent politician and critic of the Russian government.

Can Schools in Your State Pin Kids Down? Probably.

Public schoolchildren across the country were physically restrained or isolated in rooms they couldn’t leave at least 267,000 times in the 2011-2012 school year, despite a near-consensus that such practices are dangerous and have no therapeutic benefit. Many states have little regulation or oversight of such practices. This map shows where your state stands.

The Sisterhood of the Traveling Plants

Last week, news apps developers from ProPublica participated in a "Future of Food" hackathon sponsored by National Geographic.

A Deadly Surge in Tower Climber Accidents

Nineteen workers have died in communication tower accidents since 2013, a sharp rise from recent years. OSHA has announced new changes in how it polices the industry, including tracking what cell carrier or tower owner subcontractors had been working for when accidents occurred.

The Price of an Internship

Unpaid internships can help young workers advance their career goals. But they can also vary significantly in cost and quality. Explore college internship programs at different schools across the United States — or tell us about your experience interning for academic credit.

Bud’s Story, from the Records

Private Arthur ‘Bud’ Kelder died as a POW in the Philippines during World War II. His parents always hoped that his body would eventually be sent home. But despite clues, the military has never recovered his remains. Here are letters and others documents from his case from 1941 to 1950. The documents and photographs below are either from the National Archive or courtesy of John Eakin.

ER Wait Watcher

Which emergency room will see you the fastest? We've got a handy guide for impatient outpatients.

Why Develop in the Newsroom?

If you’re a software developer looking to make more of a social impact with your talents, there are plenty of exciting opportunities for you to break into the field of journalism! But what’s it like?

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