T. Christian Miller

Senior Editor

Photo of T. Christian Miller

T. Christian Miller is a senior editor for ProPublica. In more than 25 years as a professional journalist and foreign correspondent, Miller has covered four wars, a presidential campaign and reported from more than two dozen countries. He has won numerous accolades for his work in the U.S. and abroad, including two Pulitzer Prizes: one in 2016 for Explanatory Reporting, which he shared with co-author Ken Armstrong for coverage of sexual assault; and a second in 2020 for National Reporting, which he shared with colleagues Robert Faturechi and Megan Rose for coverage of the U.S. Navy. In 2015, he won two Emmy Awards for his work with Marcela Gaviria on a PBS Frontline Documentary about the link between the Firestone tire company and the Liberian war criminal Charles Taylor. Miller’s work has been featured in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, PBS Frontline, PBS Newshour, NPR and All Thing Considered, among other major media outlets.

As an investigative journalist, Miller specializes in the military and international affairs. He has extensive experience with public records, the Freedom of Information Act and data-driven reporting. In 2011, Miller was awarded a yearlong Knight Fellowship to study at Stanford University. He has lectured at the University of California at Berkeley, Stanford, the University of Southern California, Columbia and Duke, among other schools. Miller has served as an adjunct professor at UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism and as a member and treasurer of the Board of Directors for Investigative Reporters & Editors.

During the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, Miller was the only journalist in the U.S. dedicated exclusively to covering the reconstruction process. Miller's groundbreaking work led to the expulsion of a top Pentagon official, the cancellation of a major arms contract and the initiation of several investigations. His work on traumatic brain injuries in the military led the U.S. Army to award Purple Hearts for such wounds. In 2006, Miller published Blood Money: Wasted Billions, Lost Lives and Corporate Greed in Iraq (Little, Brown), which the Washington Post called one of the “indispensable” books on the Iraq war. In 2018, Miller and Armstrong published A False Report: A True Story of Rape in America (Crown Books), described as a “riveting true-crime story” by O: The Oprah Magazine. Their work was the basis for the Netflix miniseries Unbelievable, which won a Peabody Award and attracted 32 million viewers worldwide.

Miller was a foreign correspondent based in Bogotá, Colombia where he covered that nation's guerrilla conflict and its connection to Washington's war on drugs. While there, he was briefly captured and held hostage by leftist guerrillas. Miller graduated from the University of California at Berkeley with highest honors. He lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with his wife and three children.

Is This Man Responsible for the Murders of 5 American Nuns?

In an interview with ProPublica, Christopher Vambo, a former lieutenant to Charles Taylor, acknowledged that the brutal 1992 killings might have happened under his command.

Firestone and the Warlord: Money and Menace

Firestone and the Warlord: Deal With the Devil

Firestone and the Warlord: Warlord on the Rise

Firestone and the Warlord: Raining Hell

Firestone and the Warlord

In the first detailed examination of the relationship between Firestone and Liberian warlord Charles Taylor, this ProPublica/Frontline investigation lays bare the role of a global corporation in a brutal African conflict.

FDA Opens Review of Rules for Over-the-Counter Drugs, Including Acetaminophen

Federal regulators’ announcement that they will examine the regulation of non-prescription drugs such as acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, follows a ProPublica investigation.

Schumer Calls on Drug Makers to Add Safety Devices to Children’s Medicines Within a Year

Flow restrictors -- safety valves that cost pennies per bottle -- could save thousands of kids from being rushed to emergency rooms each year, but most children’s medications still don’t have them.

Over-The-Counter Pills Left Out of FDA Acetaminophen Limits

Federal drug regulators are moving to enforce a ban on prescription drugs with more than 325 milligrams of acetaminophen. But you’ll still be able to buy pills that contain up to twice that dose over-the-counter at the gas station or grocery store.

The Fix Isn't In: Why a Safety Device That Can Stop Overdoses by Kids Isn't Widely Used

Safety valves that cost pennies per bottle could save thousands of kids from being rushed to emergency rooms each year. A doctor has campaigned to have the devices added to all liquid medicines, but so far he’s had limited success.

Tylenol’s Risks Not Fully Understood, Poll Shows

Most Americans know that overdosing can be dangerous but many wrongly think it’s safe to mix drugs containing acetaminophen, a nationwide poll found.

Behind the Numbers

We explore the data behind figures showing how many people die from overdosing on acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol.

How Much Acetaminophen Are You Taking?

Many common over-the-counter drugs contain acetaminophen. Taking more than one at the same time increases your chance of “double-dipping” -- accidentally overdosing.

Iraq War Contractor Fined for Late Reports of 30 Casualties

The Sandi Group was fined $75,000 after delaying reports to the U.S. government that more than 30 of its workers had died or been injured.

Aftershock: The Blast That Shook Psycho Platoon

Five soldiers injured in the same 2009 bomb blast are a case study in a new epidemic among America's troops, who are grappling with a combination of concussion and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Injured War Contractors Sue Over Health Care, Disability Payments

A class action lawsuit filed in federal court demands $2 billion, alleging that private contracting firms and their insurers abandoned employees injured working for the government in Iraq and Afghanistan. 

Gov't Watchdog Criticizes Pentagon Center for PTSD, Brain Injuries

The Pentagon’s Defense Centers of Excellence are plagued by management weakness and obscure finances, according to recent Government Accountability Office reports.

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