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Yue Qiu

News Application Fellow

Yue Qiu was a News Application Fellow at ProPublica. She is a graduate of Columbia University with a dual degree in Journalism and International Affairs. Previously, she interned with The New York Times Shanghai Bureau.

Workers' Compensation Reforms by State

Over the past decade, states across the country have been unwinding a century-old compact with America’s workers: A guarantee that if you are injured on the job, your employer will pay your medical bills and enough of your wages to help you get by. In all, 33 states have passed laws that reduce benefits, create hurdles to getting medical care or make it more difficult to qualify for workers’ comp.

Internet Censorship in China: We’ll Sing it for You

One Chinese government agency is so proud of how well they censor the Internet that they put their feelings to music.

What I Learned From My Fellowship at ProPublica

News applications fellow Yue Qiu reflects on her seven months on ProPublica's news apps team.

A National Survey of School Desegregation Orders

Use ProPublica’s reporting to see if your school district is under a court order to end segregation.

Will My Obamacare Health Plan Costs Go Up?

The open enrollment season for health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act is open until Feb. 15, 2015. Our interactive tool lets you compare plans before you renew your insurance through the federal exchange.

Crude Connections: Where Do Trains Carry Crude Oil?

The amount of crude oil being carried on America’s railroads has grown enormously in recent years. Though the routes taken by crude-bearing trains is hidden from the public, safety-incident data reveals some of the routes.

Tobacco Bonds May Be Dangerous to Your State's Financial Health

After a bruising legal fight, tobacco companies agreed in 1998 to compensate 46 states, the District of Columbia and five U.S. territories for the health-related costs of smoking. Wall Street helped turn their annual payments into upfront cash by selling bonds to investors. Some of the deals included a form of high-risk debt, capital appreciation bonds, which obligated governments to pay out billions of their tobacco income in the future.

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