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Interactive: The 41 Gitmo Cases Decided by Judges

An Examination of 41 Gitmo Detainee Lawsuits

by Chisun Lee, ProPublica - July 22, 2009

Jan. 22: This chart has been updated.

This chart contains documents and information about the 41 Guantanamo detainees whose lawsuits seeking freedom have been decided by federal judges. More than 150 similar lawsuits are pending.

Thirty-two of the men have been found to be eligible for release, while nine have lost their cases. Of the 32 found to be unlawfully imprisoned, 11 remain in indefinite detention. (Their names are in red.) Each has been held at Guantanamo for seven years or longer.

The detainees’ Internment Serial Numbers link to entries in the New York TimesGuantanamo Docket, which contains records originally considered by the military in deciding to detain these men. (Note: The spellings vary by news outlet. We’ve used the spellings given in the federal court dockets.)

This chart is also sortable. By clicking on the up and down arrows next to the column headers, you can sort the chart by Name, Internment Serial No., Nationality, Current Age and Judge.

Read the full story that was published as an op-ed in the New York Times.

And for more of our coverage of the detention issue, click here.

Name Internment Serial No. Nationality Current Age Circumstances of Capture Summary of Allegations Status Reasons for Court's Decision Judge Court Documents
Lakhdar Boumediene10005Algeria43Arrested by Bosnian authorities in October 2001 on suspicion of plotting to bomb the U.S. embassy in Sarajevo. Cleared for release January 2002, but transported to Guantanamo at request of U.S. military. The government mainly alleged that he'd planned to travel to Afghanistan in late 2001 to fight the U.S. and allied forces. Also that he associated with al Qaeda and other suspected terrorists and that he'd worked for a Qaeda-affiliated organization that provided material support to terrorists.Judge ordered release Nov. 20, 2008. Boumediene was transferred to France May 15, 2009.Judge decided the government failed to prove its allegations by a preponderance (majority) of the evidence. "[T]he Government relies exclusively on the information contained in a classified document from an unnamed source," wrote the judge. This single piece of evidence "is not sufficient" to prove the legality of detention, he said.Richard Leon
Mohamed Nechla10003Born in Algeria, citizen of Bosnia and Herzegovina41Same as Boumediene.Similar to Boumediene's case.Judge ordered release Nov. 20, 2008. Nechla was transferred to Bosnia and Herzegovina Dec. 16, 2008.Similar to Boumediene's case.Richard Leon
Hadj Boudella10006Born in Algeria, citizen of Bosnia and Herzegovina44Same as Boumediene.Similar to Boumediene's case.Judge ordered release Nov. 20, 2008. Boudella was transferred to Bosnia and Herzegovina Dec. 16, 2008.Similar to Boumediene's case.Richard Leon
Belkacem Bensayah10001Algeria46Same as Boumediene.Government alleged that Bensayah planned to travel to Afghanistan in late 2001 and to fight U.S. and allied forces, and that he was al Qaeda's primary facilitator and financier in Bosnia and Herzegovina.Judge denied release Nov. 20, 2008. Bensayah has appealed the decision and remains at Guantanamo.Although Bensayah's five countrymen were found to be unlawfully detained, the judge said the government had produced "additional evidence that sufficiently corroborates its allegations from [an] unnamed source that Bensayah is an al-Qaida [sic] facilitator." Richard Leon
Mustafa Ait Idir10004Born in Algeria, citizen of Bosnia and Herzegovina38Same as Boumediene.Similar to Boumediene's case.Judge ordered release Nov. 20, 2008. Ait Idir was transferred to Bosnia and Herzegovina Dec. 16, 2008.Similar to Boumediene's case.Richard Leon
Saber Lahmar10002Algeria Same as Boumediene.Similar to Boumediene's case.Judge ordered release Nov. 20, 2008. Lahmar was transferred to France on Nov. 30, 2009.Similar to Boumediene's case.Richard Leon
Alla Ali Bin Ali Ahmed692Yemen26Captured March 2002 at a guesthouse for Yemenis in Faisalabad, Pakistan.The government alleged that Ali Ahmed had traveled and stayed with al Qaeda and/or Taliban members in Afghanistan, and that he'd fought and trained in Afghanistan.Judge found Ali Ahmed eligible for release May 11, 2009. He was transferred to Yemen on September 26, 2009.Judge concluded that the government had failed to present reliable evidence proving its allegations, and that certain alleged conduct -- such as traveling in the company of terrorists and staying at a suspect guesthouse -- wouldn't be enough to detain Ali Ahmed even if proved.Gladys Kessler
Ghaleb Nassar Al Bihani128Born in Saudi Arabia, citizen of Yemen28 or 29Surrendered to the Northern Alliance near the Pakistan-Afghanistan border in or after late November 2001. Was transferred to U.S. custody in June 2002.The government alleged that sometime after May 2001 Al Bihani received military training at a Qaeda camp in Afghanistan and joined a Taliban military unit that fought against the Northern Alliance, retreating with that unit in late November 2001, after the U.S. and allies began bombing. Judge denied release January 2009. Al Bihani appealed the decision and lost. He remains at Guantanamo.The judge said proof that Al Bihani had served as a cook for the Taliban by itself justified his imprisonment. He said that "faithfully serving in an al Qaeda affiliated fighting unit that is directly supporting the Taliban by helping to prepare the meals of its entire fighting force is more than sufficient 'support'" to qualify for indefinite detention. Richard Leon
Hisham Sliti174Tunisia43Captured in Pakistan in December 2001.The government alleged that in 2000 Sliti traveled from London to Afghanistan on a false passport as a Qaeda recruit, stayed at a Qaeda-affiliated guesthouse and mosque, received military training at a Qaeda camp, and helped start a terrorist organization with ties to al Qaeda. Judge denied release Dec. 30, 2008. Sliti is appealing the decision and remains at Guantanamo.The judge found that, other than for the allegation that Sliti had helped found a terrorist organization, the government had produced evidence sufficient to justify Sliti's indefinite detention. Richard Leon
Mohammed El Gharani269Born in Saudi Arabia, citizen of Chad22 or 23Arrested by Pakistani authorities and turned over to the United States in early 2002. The government alleged that he'd stayed at a Qaeda-affiliated guesthouse in Afghanistan, received military training at a Qaeda camp, served as a courier for al Qaeda members, fought the U.S. and allies at the battle of Tora Bora, and belonged to a Qaeda cell based in London.Judge found El Gharani eligible for release Jan. 13, 2009. He was transferred to Chad on June 11, 2009. The government's evidence was unreliable, the judge said, because it consisted chiefly of statements by two other detainees -- sometimes contradicting each other -- whose believability was questioned by the government itself.Richard Leon
Moath Hamza Ahmed Al Alwi28Yemen31 or 32Arrested in Pakistan by Pakistani authorities in late 2001 and transferred to U.S. custody. The government alleged that Al Alwi stayed at guesthouses and received military training at camps closely associated with al Qaeda and the Taliban, that he supported Taliban fighters (including after the U.S. forces arrived in October 2001), and that he served as a bodyguard to Osama bin Laden. Judge denied release Dec. 30, 2008. Al Alwi is appealing the decision and remains at Guantanamo.The judge said that "more than ample evidence" proves Al Alwi stayed at Qaeda and Taliban guesthouses and trained with and supported the Taliban. This was enough to justify his indefinite detention, even without persuasive evidence that Al Alwi had taken up arms himself against the U.S. or its allies. Since this conduct alone justified his detention, the judge said, there was no need for the court to address the allegations that Al Alwi had been a bin Laden bodyguard and trained with al Qaeda. Richard Leon
Hedi Hammamy717Tunisia40Arrested in April 2002 in Pakistan by Pakistani authorities and transferred to U.S. custody.The government alleged that Hammamy fought with the Taliban or al Qaeda against the U.S., belonged to an Italian terrorist cell supporting Islamic terrorist groups, attended a terrorist training camp in Afghanistan, and belonged to a Pakistan-based organization too secret for the government to describe.Judge denied release April 4, 2009. Hammamy is appealing the decision and remains at Guantanamo.The judge said that evidence that Hammamy had fought the U.S. and belonged to the Italian terrorist cell justified his detention. The judge didn't address the other allegations. Richard Leon
Yasin Muhammed Basardh252Yemen32 or 33Arrested near Pakistan-Afghanistan border in early 2002.The government alleged that Basardh trained at a Qaeda military camp and fought for the Taliban, hiding with Osama bin Laden in the mountains of Tora Bora in late 2001. Judge found Basardh eligible for release April 15, 2009. He remains at Guantanamo, while the government appeals the decision. In November, the U.S. Supreme Court without explanation declined to consider his claim that his continuing detention is unconstitutional.The judge said the admitted Taliban fighter could no longer be properly detained, because news reports showed that Basardh gave U.S. authorities information about numerous other suspected terrorists. “[A]ny ties with the enemy have been severed, and any realistic risk that he could rejoin the enemy has been foreclosed," the judge wrote.Ellen Segal Huvelle
Huzaifa Parhat320China (member of Uighur minority)38Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.The government alleged that Parhat was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies. Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Parhat released Oct. 8, 2008. The government appealed, and judge's release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Parhat nevertheless was transferred to Bermuda, June 11, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations -- that ETIM was linked to al Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S. -- and that Parhat could not be held as an enemy combatant on "bare assertions." D.C. federal appeals court judges Merrick Garland, David Sentelle, Thomas Griffith; D.C. federal trial court judge Ricardo Urbina
Abdul Nasser278China (member of Uighur minority)31 or 32Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for transfer November 2005. Federal trial judge ordered Nassar released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Nasser nevertheless was transferred to Bermuda, June 11, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Abdul Sabour275China (member of Uighur minority)28 or 29Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for release November 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Sabour released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Sabour has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court's decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Abdul Semet295China (member of Uighur minority)32Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for release June 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Semet released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Semet nevertheless was transferred to Bermuda, June 11, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Hammad Memet328China (member of Uighur minority)31Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for transfer May 2008. Federal trial judge ordered Memet released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Memet has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court's decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Jalal Jalaldin285China (member of Uighur minority)30Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Parhat released Oct. 8, 2008. The government appealed, and judge's release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Jalaldin nevertheless was transferred to Bermuda, June 11, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Khalid Ali280China (member of Uighur minority)31Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Ali released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Ali has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court's decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Sabir Osman282China (member of Uighur minority)34 or 35Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Osman released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Osman has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court's decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Edham Mamet102China (member of Uighur minority)34Captured in Afghanistan in November 2001Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Mamet released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. He was transferred to Palau on Oct. 31. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Bahtiyar Mahnut277China (member of Uighur minority)33Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for transfer December 2005. Federal trial judge ordered Mahnut released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Mahnut has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court's decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Arkin Mahmud103China (member of Uighur minority)44 or 45Captured in Afghanistan in November 2001Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for transfer January 2006. Federal trial judge ordered Mahmud released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Mahmud has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court's decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Abdur Razakah219China (member of Uighur minority) Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for transfer December 2005. Federal trial judge ordered Razakah released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Razakah has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court's decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Ahmad Tourson201China (member of Uighur minority)38Captured in Afghanistan in November 2001Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for release December 2005. Federal trial judge ordered Tourson released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. He was transferred to Palau on Oct. 31. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Abdul Ghappar Abdul Rahman281China (member of Uighur minority)36Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Rahman released Oct. 8, 2008. The government appealed, and judge's release order was blocked by D.C. federal appeals court. He was transferred to Palau on Oct. 31. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Adel Noori584China (member of Uighur minority)29Captured May 2002.Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for transfer October 2005. Federal trial judge ordered Noori released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. He was transferred to Palau on Oct. 31. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Anwar Hassan250China (member of Uighur minority)34Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for release June 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Hassan released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. He was transferred to Palau on Oct. 31. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Dawut Abdurehim289China (member of Uighur minority)34Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.Similar to Parhat's case.Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Abdurehim released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. He was transferred to Palau on Oct. 31. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.Similar to Parhat's case.Ricardo Urbina
Abdulrahim Abdul Razak Al Janko (a.k.a. Ginco)489Syria31Captured by U.S. forces in January 2002 in Kandahar, Afghanistan.The government alleged that, in early 2000, Janko spent five days at a Taliban guesthouse and trained for 18 days at a Qaeda military camp. Judge found Janko eligible for release June 22, 2009. According to the Department of Justice, he has since been transferred to a foreign nation; the department will not identify that nation, or provide the date of transfer.Janko was eligible for release, the judge said, because by the time of his arrest in 2002 he should not have been considered to be part of the Taliban or al Qaeda. The evidence showed that he'd been tortured by al Qaeda and imprisoned for 18 months by the Taliban in an infamously "horrific" prison.Richard Leon
Mohammed Jawad900AfghanistanDisputed but no older than 24Arrested by local officials in Afghanistan in December 2002. The government alleged that on Dec. 17, 2002, Jawad tossed a grenade in Afghanistan that seriously injured two U.S. soldiers and their local interpreter.On July 30, 2009, judge ordered that "beginning on August 21" the government "shall promptly release petitioner Jawad.” He was transferred to Afghanistan on August 24.Technically the judge ordered Jawad released because the government said it would no longer detain him as a wartime enemy. But the government's decision followed a scathing reprimand from the judge for continuing to detain Jawad and prosecute him in a military commission based mostly on a confession obtained by Afghan officials under death threats. Ellen Segal Huvelle
Khalid Abdullah Mishal Al Mutairi213Kuwait34Captured near Pakistan-Afghanistan border in November 2001.The government alleged that Al Mutairi was a part of al Qaeda or of a force associated with al Qaeda, because, among other claims, he'd attended a training camp believed to be affiliated with al Qaeda. On July 29, 2009, judge ordered the government to "take all necessary and appropriate steps to facilitate Al Mutairi's release forthwith." He was transferred to Kuwait on Oct. 13.The judge concluded that "there is nothing in the record beyond speculation" to prove the government's allegations. Intelligence reports were too imprecise and needed corroborating proof, she said. For instance, "one reference, in a portion of one sentence, in one interrogation report," was not enough to prove Al Mutairi had attended a terrorist training camp, because the report didn't clearly identify him. She rejected one self-incriminating statement from an interrogation of Al Mutairi because "he appears to have been goaded into making these statements."Colleen Kollar-Kotelly
Mohammed Al Adahi33Yemen46/47Captured by Pakistani authorities near the Afghanistan border in December 2001.The government alleged that Adahi once helped tend to wounded Taliban soldiers during a bus trip; was present in Kabul during the U.S. air campaign there; and was in possession of the model of a watch that has been used in bombings linked to al Qaeda.Judge ordered release Aug. 17, 2009. The government has appealed. Al Adahi remains at Guantanamo.The judge found "no reliable evidence" that Adahi supported, trained or fought for, or was a member of Al Qaida, and that while Adahi acknowledged meeting Osama Bin Laden, that did not justify his detention.Gladys Kessler
Fouad Mahmoud Al Rabiah551Kuwait50Captured near the Afghanistan/Pakistan border in Dec. 2001.The government alleged that Rabiah "provided material support to the Taliban and al Qaida," meeting with bin Laden four times in July 2001 and delivering money to him.Judge ordered release Sept. 17, 2009. Rabiah was transferred to Kuwait on Dec. 9, 2009.The judge found that the evidence against Rabiah consisted "almost exclusively on Rabiah's 'confessions,'" which even Rabiah's interrogators concluded were "not believable." Colleen Kollar-Kotelly
Adham Mohammed Ali Awad88Yemen26/27Captured in Afghanistan in November 2001.The government alleged that Awad was identified by a senior al Qaeda leader as having participated in fighting against the U.S.Judge denied release Aug. 12, 2009. The detainee is appealing his decision and remains at Guantanamo.Although the judge found the case against Awad "gossamer thin," he ruled it was "more likely than not" that Awad was, "for some period of time, 'part of' Al Qaida."James Robertson
Fawzi Khalid Abdullah Fahad Al Odah232Kuwait32Captured by Pakistani border guards in November 2001.The government alleged that Odah admitted firing an AK-47 at a training camp in Afghanistan and carrying an AK-47 through the Tora Bora mountains for ten to 11 days during the U.S. air campaign there.Judge denied release Aug. 24, 2009. Al Odah is appealing his decision and remains at Guantanamo.The judge found that Odah had attended a Taliban training camp, and that "more likely than not," he "became a part of the forces of the Taliban and Al Qaeda."Colleen Kollar-Kotelly
Sufyian Barhoumi694Algeria36Captured in Pakistan in March 2002.The government alleged that Barhoumi traveled to Afghanistan in 1999 to attend weapons training in several camps, then trained others, and engaged in hostilities against the U.S.Judge denied release Sept. 3, 2009. Barhoumi is appealing the decision and remains held at Guantanamo.According to the significantly redacted transcript of a sealed court hearing, the judge found Barhoumi to be "a fighter against U.S. forces" who should be detained. From Barhoumi’s own statements and those of an informant, the judge concluded that he participated in military training and traveled a route through conflict zones consistent with the government's allegations against him. Rosemary Collyer
Farhi Saeed bin Mohammed311Algeria48Captured by Pakistani authorities in late 2001 while attempting to cross the border from Afghanistan to Pakistan.The government alleged that Mohammed received weapons training in Afghanistan, and that he saw Osama bin Laden at a funeral in Kabul shortly after 9/11.Judge ordered release Nov. 19, 2009. Mohammed remains at Guantanamo.The court has not yet released a declassified version of the judge’s opinion.Gladys Kessler
Musa’ab Al Madhwani839Yemen28 or 29Captured by Pakistani police on Sept. 11, 2002. The government alleged that Madwani received weapons instruction at a Taliban training camp, and participated in military operations against the U.S.-led coalition.Judge denied release Dec. 14, 2009. Madwani remains at Guantanamo. The judge rejected the bulk of the government's evidence as unreliable because it was derived from harsh interrogations of the detainee. But he believed other statements Madhwani gave -- during military hearings at Guantanamo and in federal court -- and said they showed Madhwani had received weapons training and belonged to Al Qaeda.Thomas F. Hogan
Saeed Mohammed Saleh Hatim25532 or 33YemenCaptured near the Pakistan-Afghanistan border in 2002.The government alleged that Hatim trained at a suspect camp in Afghanistan and supported Taliban fighters near Bagram by supplying them with food.Judge found Hatim eligible for release on Dec. 16, 2009. He remains at Guantanamo.The court has not yet released a declassified version of the judge’s opinion.Ricardo Urbina

ProPublica's Christopher Flavelle contributed reporting to this chart. Director of Research Lisa Schwartz also contributed to this database.

Produced by Krista Kjellman Schmidt, ProPublica

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