Journalism in the Public Interest

From Metal Detectors to a Mass Exodus: MuckReads Weekly

Some of the best #MuckReads we read this week. Want to receive these by email?  Sign up to get this briefing delivered to your inbox every weekend.

100,000 NYC School Children Face Airport-Style Security Screening Every Day, ProPublica/WNYC

New York City: where for some, going to school is as much of a hassle as going through airport security. Every day, at more than 200 schools across the city, students are required to go through metal detectors. According to this ProPublica and WNYC analysis, black and Hispanic students are "nearly three times more likely to walk through a metal detector than their white counterparts."

In Exile, The New York Times Magazine

While the world was watching the Syrian refugee crisis, an exodus was happening in the Dominican Republic. This is an in-depth look at how – through deportations, intimidation and violence – people of Haitian descent are being driven from their homes in the Dominican Republic.

How Indiana failed to protect 76-year-old Shirley Jarrett, The Indianapolis Star

Thousands of vulnerable adults in Indiana are exposed to "horrific abuse and neglect" every year. This article examines treatment of vulnerable adults in a state where animal control, in Indianapolis alone, receives almost 50 percent more funding than Adult Protective Services does statewide.

The Story Behind The Deadliest Prison Bus Crash in Texas History, Buzzfeed

Texas transports around 580,000 inmates between prisons by bus every year. Usually, these prison transports go off without a hitch. But this one was different. This is what happened when a bus carrying 12 shackled inmates ran off the road one night last January.

America's trapping boom relies on cruel and grisly tools, Reveal News

Though it may seem like a thing of the past, the fur-trapping industry is booming. Up to 7 million wild animals are captured and killed every year using tactics, such as strangulation, that led one veterinarian to say, "It stuns me. I can't believe it's allowed."

Dirty Little Secrets: In Your Fish, WNYC

People regularly fish in New Jersey's Passaic River, perhaps unaware that the river is "one of the most contaminated bodies of water in the country." This is the latest installment of WNYC's "Dirty Little Secrets" investigation on toxic waste and pollution in New Jersey.

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