benderbending/Flickr; Krista Kjellman/ProPublicaStimulus money is "beginning to percolate nationwide," the Washington Post reports. But it's a slow drip. Stimulus paperwork is proving too much for some existing bureaucracies, especially when new hurdles intended to increase transparency are thrown into the mix. Even after contracts are assigned, the money can be held up by environmental reviews, public debate and even the upcoming football season (a Missouri highway interchange is ready for work, but its proximity to the Kansas City stadium will cause delays).

Meanwhile, Republican governors who oppose the trickle of stimulus funds are increasingly giving in. Politico reports that Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, who said last month she was rejecting up to 45 percent of the money, has softened that stand to say it's "possible" that Alaska won't apply for certain funds. South Carolina's Mark Sanford, perhaps the most vocal stimulus opponent, told Politico the fight had left him "beaten up pretty bad."

Project of the day: Politico's report also reminds us that local papers are reporting Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal's transportation department will seek federal funding for a highspeed train from Baton Rouge to... Bourbon Street! Jindal criticized stimulus for rails in a television address, saying the "wasteful" provision was for building a levitation train from "Las Vegas to Disneyland."