Some of the best #MuckReads we read this week. Want to receive these by email?  Sign up to get this briefing delivered to your inbox every weekend.

Political profiteers push Ohio's pot vote (The Center for Public Integrity)

"'The honest and most easy response is: I am going to profit from this,' the initiative's creator told the Center for Public Integrity. 'If people are upset about me making money, I don't know what to say other than that that's part of the American process.' ... The measure would root the 10 marijuana growth sites to particular land parcels, which happen to be controlled by the mysterious companies funding the initiative."

In an unmarked grave, a baby's untold story (BuzzFeed News)

"BuzzFeed News obtained from other sources many of the documents (Department of Children and Families) tried to keep secret. But the name of the little baby who had died remained unknown. She was anonymous. Then, this March, the city clerk of Beverly, Massachusetts, found a death certificate of an infant who died on Jan. 21, 2012, aged 2 months and 5 days. There it was, under 'decedent name': Lily Marie Brown."

Locked away: Grady Memorial Hospital withheld rape evidence from police, despite victim requests (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

"...victims at Grady may have undergone an invasive, grueling rape exam for nothing, advocates said, and dangerous criminal may have gone unpunished. Police could have been flagged to patterns of attacks. Entering DNA samples into a national database could have unmasked attackers who were strangers to their victims or prevented serial rapists from striking again."

In North Dakota's Bakken oil boom, there will be blood (Reveal News)

"...the boom also has been a serial killer. On average, someone dies about every six weeks from an accident in the Bakken – at least 74 since 2006, according to an analysis by Reveal, the first comprehensive accounting of such deaths using data obtained from Canadian and U.S. regulators."

A fragile peace: Part 1 and part 2 of a special report on Ciudad Juárez (El Daily Post)

"It has been three years since the violence abated and the murder rate dipped from 300 a month to 30. In March and April of 2015, the number of homicides in the city reached its lowest point since 2005. But crime experts say that could change because the judicial system hasn't come down hard enough on some of the criminals."

As VA cuts narcotic prescriptions, veterans with chronic pain cry foul (The Austin American-Statesman)

"'Why do they let us suffer without our pain medicine?' one veteran said. 'It feels like we are being punished for other people who abused drugs. But what about those of us who take the medications on a regular basis for chronic pain? The VA should just treat its patients humanely.'"

Social worker obtained state licenses despite criminal past (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

"He raped several women while their husbands were at work. He robbed a Milwaukee bank and burglarized homes. And he kidnapped and raped a 14-year-old girl. Deisler was convicted and spent a decade behind bars. He got out and became a licensed social worker and therapist in Wisconsin and two other states, specializing in treating addicts and sex offenders."