Close Close Comment Creative Commons Donate Email Add Email Facebook Instagram Facebook Messenger Mobile Nav Menu Podcast Print RSS Search Secure Twitter WhatsApp YouTube

ProPublica Announces Two New Board Members

ProPublica announced Friday the appointment of Tomiko Brown-Nagin and Carrie Lozano to its board of directors.

Tomiko Brown-Nagin is dean of the Harvard Radcliffe Institute, one of the world’s leading centers for interdisciplinary research across the humanities, sciences, social sciences, arts and professions. She is also the Daniel P.S. Paul professor of constitutional law at Harvard Law School and a professor of history at Harvard University.

An award-winning legal historian and an expert in constitutional law and education law and policy, she is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Law Institute and the American Philosophical Society; a fellow of the American Bar Foundation and a distinguished lecturer for the Organization of American Historians. Brown-Nagin has published articles and book chapters on a wide range of topics, including the Supreme Court’s equal protection jurisprudence, civil rights law and history, the Affordable Care Act and education reform. As a frequent lecturer and media commentator, she is a contributing editor to Politico Magazine.

Brown-Nagin’s latest book, “Civil Rights Queen: Constance Baker Motley and the Struggle for Equality” (Pantheon, 2022), explores the life and times of the pathbreaking lawyer, politician, and judge. Her 2011 book, “Courage to Dissent: Atlanta and the Long History of the Civil Rights Movement” (Oxford), won the Bancroft Prize in U.S. History, among other honors.

In 2019, Brown-Nagin was appointed chair of the Presidential Committee on Harvard and the Legacy of Slavery, which is anchored at the Radcliffe Institute. The Committee issued a landmark report detailing the University’s direct, financial and intellectual ties to slavery, which resulted in the Harvard Corporation’s allocation of $100 million to redress harms to descendant communities in the United States and in the Caribbean.

Carrie Lozano is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and journalist. As director of the Sundance Institute’s Documentary Film and Artist Programs, she helps serve hundreds of filmmakers each year with funding, labs, fellowships and intensive artist support.

Prior to Sundance, she designed and directed the International Documentary Association’s Enterprise Documentary Fund, where she supported filmmakers with funds and professional development on projects at the intersection of documentary and journalism, including “Welcome To Chechnya,” “A Thousand Cuts,” “Through the Night,” “Always In Season” and “One Child Nation.” At IDA, she also led the Pare Lorentz Documentary Fund, which supports U.S.-focused social issue and environmental justice films.

Lozano was previously a documentary executive at Al Jazeera America and a senior producer of the network’s investigative series “Fault Lines,” where her team garnered numerous honors including an Emmy, a Peabody and several Headliner Awards. Lozano also led BAVC Media’s MediaMaker Fellowship and was a lecturer in the Documentary Program at U.C. Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism.

Among other work, she produced the Academy Award-nominated documentary “The Weather Underground,” the live cinema piece “Utopia In Four Movements” and produced, directed and edited the Teddy Award nominee “Reporter Zero.” Her most recent film, the 2016 documentary “The Ballad of Fred Hersch,” is a portrait of one of today’s foremost jazz pianists. Lozano serves on the advisory boards of U.C. Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism and PBS Frontline, and is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

“Tomiko and Carrie’s wealth of experience, as well as their deep commitment to accountability journalism, are valuable additions to the board,” said ProPublica Board Chairman Paul Sagan. “We are thrilled to have their talents and insights as ProPublica continues the crucial work of journalism that shines a light on injustice and creates real-world change.”

Latest Stories from ProPublica

Current site Current page