We know that the rules protecting people with disabilities are facing government scrutiny. Late last year, for example, the Justice Department scrapped guidelines that help builders, architects and business owners keep compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

What we don’t know is what that’s meant for people. What has it meant for people with disabilities whose rights the ADA guarantees? What has it meant for the small business owners who risk costly lawsuits and Justice Department scrutiny if their establishments aren’t accessible to people with disabilities? What has it meant for commercial architects and construction contractors? What has it meant for caregivers?

We’re asking for your help to understand that part of the story.

It’s a story that’s gone under-examined, we think, in part because it doesn’t fit the simple, predictable narrative — Republicans rolling back laws to benefit business interests. House Democrats co-sponsored legislation earlier this year meant to curb ADA lawsuits, and several of the guidelines scuttled by the Justice Department benefited business owners as much as they did people with disabilities.

We’re also interested in hearing from folks who have seen firsthand how disability rights issues are being handled on Capitol Hill, in the White House, and at the Justice Department.

You can help us make sense of what these policy changes mean in the real world by answering the questions below and sharing your stories and experiences. We won’t publish any information you share without your permission. If you’d rather talk on Signal or WhatsApp, which are more secure, send a message to 202-714-3777. And if you have any questions, you can email us at ada@propublica.org.