Ellis Simani

Data Reporter

Photo of Ellis Simani

Ellis Simani is a data reporter at ProPublica.

His recent work has focused on the stock trading of the wealthiest Americans. In “The Inside Edge,” he and his colleagues revealed several investment advantages that enable top executives and other well-connected investors to trade stock with remarkable timing.

Prior to that, he worked with a team of reporters on “The Secret IRS Files,” which investigated systemic inequities in the U.S. tax system that allow the ultrawealthy to avoid paying federal income taxes. The series won a number of awards, including the Selden Ring and the Barlett & Steele Award.

He’s also covered issues related to housing and debt for ProPublica, with a particular focus on evictions. Before joining ProPublica, he worked on the Los Angeles Times’ data visualization desk.

Sports Team Owners Face New Scrutiny From IRS Over Tax Avoidance

A new campaign by the tax agency comes after ProPublica revealed how billionaires generate what can be hundreds of millions in tax savings by purchasing professional sports teams.

A Top Mutual Fund Executive Made Millions for Himself Trading the Same Stocks His Giant Fund Was Trading

Confidential IRS data reveals that David Hoeft, chief investment officer of mutual fund giant Dodge & Cox, was one of many investment managers who bought and sold the same stocks their company was trading.

How Warren Buffett Privately Traded in Stocks That Berkshire Hathaway Was Buying and Selling

Buffett has long said such trading would be a conflict of interest, and Berkshire policies prohibit it. But confidential records show that, on at least three occasions, he sold millions of dollars of shares in stocks that Berkshire was trading.

The Biotech Edge: How Executives and Well-Connected Investors Make Exquisitely Timed Trades in Health Care Stocks

Secret IRS records reveal dozens of highly fortuitous biotech and health care trades. One executive bought shares in a corporate partner just before a sale, and an investor traded options right before a company’s revenues took off, netting millions.

Wealthy Executives Make Millions Trading Competitors’ Stock With Remarkable Timing

Never-before-seen IRS records show that CEOs are sometimes making multimillion-dollar bets on the stocks of direct competitors and partners — and doing so with exquisite timing.

How These Ultrawealthy Politicians Avoided Paying Taxes

IRS records reveal how Gov. Jim Justice, Gov. Jared Polis, former Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and other wealthy political figures slashed their taxes using strategies unavailable to most of their constituents.

The Billionaire Playbook: How Sports Owners Use Their Teams to Avoid Millions in Taxes

Owners like Steve Ballmer can take the kinds of deductions on team assets — everything from media deals to player contracts — that industrialists take on factory equipment. That helps them pay lower tax rates than players and even stadium workers.

There’s Only One State Where Falling Behind on Rent Could Mean Jail Time. That Could Change.

Only Arkansas permits criminal consequences for nonpayment of rent — and it has enforced the law during the pandemic. Now, after ProPublica investigated the practice, some legislators want to revoke the statute.

The Pandemic Hasn’t Stopped This School District From Suing Parents Over Unpaid Textbook Fees

When the pandemic started, several school districts in Indiana halted a long-standing practice: suing families for unpaid textbook fees. But one school district has filed nearly 300 lawsuits against parents, and others also have returned to court.

A Deputy Prosecutor Was Fired for Speaking Out Against Jail Time for People Who Fall Behind on Rent

Arkansas prosecutor Josh Drake called the state’s criminal eviction statute “cruel” and “unconstitutional.” Criminal charges against tenants falling behind on rent have continued, even as the pandemic has worsened.

When Falling Behind on Rent Leads to Jail Time

Evictions in Arkansas can snowball from criminal charges to arrests to jail time because of a 119-year-old law that mostly impacts female, Black and low-income renters. Even prosecutors have called it unconstitutional.

Arkansas: My Landlord Is Trying to Kick Me Out. What Can I Do?

If you live in Arkansas and are worried about being evicted, you’re not alone. Our reporting revealed thousands have been forced into the confusing legal process during the pandemic. Here’s how it works — and what you can do.

The Eviction Ban Worked, but It’s Almost Over. Some Landlords Are Getting Ready.

The CARES Act was largely successful in keeping millions of American renters from facing eviction during the pandemic. As protections fade, some landlords are gearing up to return to court.

Can I Be Evicted During Coronavirus?

Even if you live in a state that has not banned evictions, federal rules may still protect you. Look up your address to learn more.

Can You Be Evicted During Coronavirus? Here’s How to Find Out.

The CARES Act temporarily protects millions of renters from being evicted, and many states and cities passed their own rules to help those struggling to pay rent. Use our new database to find out if eviction bans might apply to you.

Despite Federal Ban, Landlords Are Still Moving to Evict People During the Pandemic

ProPublica found landlords in at least four states have violated the ban, which was put in place by the CARES Act but has no clear enforcement mechanism.

We’ve Gotten a Lot of Questions About Our Database of Credibly Accused Priests. Here Are the Answers.

Our database compiles lists of thousands of priests deemed “credibly accused” of sexual abuse and misconduct. Dozens of readers wrote in with questions and suggestions.

Líderes católicos prometieron transparencia con el tema del abuso de menores. No han cumplido.

Tras décadas de proteger la identidad de abusadores sexuales infantiles acusados, y, con el fin de revelarlas al público, muchos líderes de la Iglesia Católica comienzan ahora a divulgar listas con sus nombres. Sin embargo, tales listas son incongruentes e incompletas, u omiten detalles críticos.

Credibly Accused

Over the last year and a half, U.S. dioceses and religious orders covering most of the Catholics in the country have released lists of what they regard as “credibly accused” abusers who have served in their ranks. You can search these lists in our interactive database.

Con acusaciones creíbles

Durante el pasado año y medio, diócesis y órdenes religiosas en los Estados Unidos, que cubren la mayoría de la población católica del país, emitieron listas de los abusadores "con acusaciones creíbles" que han servido en sus filas. Puede hacer búsquedas en las listas por medio de nuestra base de datos interactiva. Esta sección estará disponible en español próximamente.

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