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Robin Fields

Managing Editor

Photo of Robin Fields

Robin Fields became managing editor of ProPublica on January 1, 2013. She joined ProPublica as a reporter in 2008 and became a senior editor in 2010. As an editor, she has overseen projects on political dark money, injection wells, the militaryâs handling of traumatic brain injuries, police violence in post-Katrina New Orleans, cell tower deaths, and the nation's troubled system of death investigations. Work she has edited has twice been honored with George Polk Awards, as well as awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and IRE. These projects also have resulted in four documentaries made in partnership with PBS "Frontline," two of which received Emmy nominations. As a reporter at ProPublica, Fields did a project on U.S. dialysis care and wrote stories about a troubled chain of psychiatric hospitals. Fields was a finalist for a National Magazine Award for her work on dialysis, which was also honored by IRE and the Society of Professional Journalists and received the Gannett Foundation Award for Innovative Investigative Journalism. Fields began her career at the Sun-Sentinel in South Florida. Before joining ProPublica, spent nine years as a reporter at the Los Angeles Times, where she worked on investigations into political fundraiser Norman Hsu, California's adult guardianship system and abuses at the J. Paul Getty Trust. Her work on guardianship received the National Journalism Award for investigative reporting, a Sigma Delta Chi Public Service Award and an Associated Press Managing Editors Public Service Award.

Citing ProPublica Investigation Into University of Phoenix, Congressman Calls for Hearings

Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, D-Md., calls for hearings into the recruiting practices of for-profit schools, citing an investigation by ProPublica and Marketplace. "To find that for-profit institutions allegedly drew students in with disingenuous claims and sometimes outright fabrication, subjected them to onerous loans, and left them with often unusable 'credits,' is inexcusable," he said.

Psychiatric Care's Peril and Profits

Crystal Marshall, 17

Alan Chambers, 42

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