Close Comment Creative Commons Donate Email Facebook Mobile Phone Podcast Print RSS Search Search Signal Twitter WhatsApp

Stephen Engelberg

Editor-in-Chief

Photo of Stephen Engelberg

Stephen Engelberg was the founding managing editor of ProPublica from 2008–2012, and became editor-in-chief on January 1, 2013. He worked previously as managing editor of The Oregonian in Portland, Oregeon, where he supervised investigative projects and news coverage. Before that, Engelberg worked for 18 years at The New York Times as an editor and reporter, founding the paper’s investigative unit and serving as a reporter in Washington, D.C., and Warsaw. Engelberg shared in two George Polk Awards for reporting: the first, in 1989, for articles on nuclear proliferation; the second, in 1994, for articles on U.S. immigration. A group of articles he co-authored in 1995 on an airplane crash was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize. Projects he supervised at the Times on Mexican corruption (published in 1997) and the rise of Al Qaeda (published beginning in January 2001) were awarded the Pulitzer Prize. During his years at The Oregonian, the paper won the Pulitzer for breaking news and was finalist for its investigative work on methamphetamines and charities intended to help the disabled. He is the co-author of “Germs: Biological Weapons and America's Secret War” (2001).

Judge Allows Feds to Revise Filing in Anthrax Case

The Justice Department initially asserted flatly that Army researcher Bruce Ivins, whom the FBI accused of manufacturing the anthrax, lacked the specialized equipment needed to produce the deadly powder at a U.S. bio-weapons lab.

Second Thoughts on Sex and Politics

The resignation of Oregon Congressman David Wu provides a compelling argument for why news organizations should aggressively pursue allegations of inappropriate sexual conduct—even old ones.

Judge Says U.S. Must Show Good Cause to Revise Anthrax Filing

In an order issued Monday, U.S. District Judge Daniel Hurley of West Palm Beach, Fla., said the government must "show good cause" before he will allow it to change the original filing, which lawyers for the department’s Civil Division made in an eight-year-old case brought against the government by the family of one of the five victims.

Government Anthrax Flip-Flop Could Boost Victims’ Lawsuit

Conflicting court filings and a retraction could undermine the Department of Justice’s credibility in a $50 million wrongful death lawsuit filed by the family of photographer Robert Stevens, first victim to die in the 2001 anthrax letter attacks.

Justice Department Retracts Court Filings That Undercut FBI's Anthrax Case

The unusual seven-page correction, hurriedly filed in federal court in Florida, does not erase testimony from government scientists who challenged the FBI's finding that Bruce Ivins mailed anthrax-filled letters that killed five people in 2001.

Justice Department Filing Casts Doubt on Guilt of Bruce Ivins, Accused in Anthrax Case

The Justice Department has called into question a key pillar of the FBI's case against Bruce Ivins, the Army scientist accused of mailing the anthrax-laced letters that killed five people and terrorized Congress a decade ago.

In the Phone Hacking Scandal, Remember Watergate

From this side of the Atlantic, the British phone hacking scandal seems more about a failure of British law enforcement than of the press to police itself.

Mexico's Regional Newspapers Limit Reporting of Cartels' Role in Drug Violence

Mexico’s regional newspapers, the source of news for many in the country, downplay the role of drug cartels in assassinations and other attacks on civil authorities. Many papers don’t even cover all the drug-linked executions in their localities.

Experts, Intelligence Agencies Question a Defector's Claims About Burma's Nuclear Ambitions

An analysis that contends Burma has begun a program to build nuclear weapons is disputed by the Central Intelligence Agency, Department of Energy and outside experts who say the evidence provided by a Burmese defector does not support its conclusions.

Editor's Note: How We Got the Government's Secret Dialysis Data

After two years of delays, the government recently fulfilled ProPublica's request for data that track whether death, hospitalization and infection rates at dialysis clinics are better or worse than expected.

Editor's Note: Dollars for Docs

The stories ProPublica is publishing today on the drug industry are part of a broader effort to expand the possibilities of collaborative journalism.

How WikiLeaks Could Change the Way Reporters Deal With Secrets

Journalists often consulted with sources on whether to release sensitive information, but the WkiLeaks case changes all that.

Slate Takes a Closer Look at the Tragedy of a Bullied Teenager

A Slate report delves into the case of Phoebe Prince and the teenagers accused of driving her to suicide.

Reverse Ferret! When Stories Bite Back

While politicians jumped the gun in the Shirley Sherrod saga, reporters once again showed the value of … reporting.

The Questionable Cost of America's Spy Games

Everyone loves a good spy story, but as recent cases show, they don't always live up to the hype. Witness the cases of the suburban sleepers and the Iranian nuclear scientist.

When the Police Control the Press

Photographer Briefly Detained by Police Near BP's Texas City Refinery

A photographer taking pictures of a BP Texas refinery for ProPublica was detained by police, a Homeland Security agent and a BP security officer before being released.

Follow ProPublica

Our Latest Stories

Current site Current page