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Theodoric Meyer

Reporting Fellow

Theodoric Meyer was ProPublica’s reporting fellow. He started at ProPublica as a reporting intern in 2012 and previously worked as a reporting intern at The New York Times and The Seattle Times. He was a lead reporter for ProPublica’s “After the Flood” series, which won the Deadline Club Award for Local Reporting in 2014. His reporting on the National Security Agency with Justin Elliott was cited in Judge Richard J. Leon’s ruling that N.S.A. surveillance of phone metadata was likely unconstitutional. He is a graduate of McGill University and Columbia University.

How the NSA’s Claim on Thwarted Terrorist Plots Has Spread

In the months since revelations about NSA surveillance began, intelligence officials and members of Congress have claimed that the agency's efforts have thwarted 54 terrorist attacks. But a review of official statements shows the NSA has been inconsistent about how many plots have actually been thwarted and what the role the spying programs played. Despite a lack of evidence, Congress and the media have rushed to repeat the most extreme version of the NSA’s claims.

What Happened After Congress Passed a Climate Change Law? Very Little

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has failed to set up a body that would make recommendations on how to deal with rising seas.

F.A.Q. on U.S. Aid to Egypt: Where Does the Money Go, And How Is It Spent?

With the Obama administration cutting off some U.S. aid to Egypt as the violence there continues, we've taken a step back to look at how much the U.S. gives Egypt and what those billions have bought.

U.S. Is Arming Syrian Rebels, But Refugees Who've Aided Them Are Considered Terrorists

The designation could make it harder for Syrian refugees to come to the U.S., even if they haven’t actually taken up arms against the regime.

The Best Reporting on Hurricanes and Their Aftermaths

We’ve round up some of the best reporting on hurricanes and what happens after they’re over — from inept planning to police abuses to waste and misspending during the recovery.

New Study Finds High Levels of Arsenic in Groundwater Near Fracking Sites

A Q&A with Brian Fontenot, whose research gives the latest indication that fracking may be tied to arsenic contamination.

Using Outdated Data, FEMA Is Wrongly Placing Homeowners in Flood Zones

Homeowners have to bear the cost of fixing the agency's mistakes.

Why So Many Flood Maps Are Still Out of Date

A Q&A with Professor David Maidment on what makes today’s maps 10 times more accurate than the ones much of the country is still stuck with

Four Ways the Government Subsidizes Risky Coastal Rebuilding

Certain federal programs encourage developers to build and rebuild in areas that are increasingly vulnerable to flooding and hurricanes.

The NSA Black Hole: 5 Basic Things We Still Don’t Know About the Agency's Snooping

The recent leaks have shed light on one of the darkest corners of the U.S. government -- but when it comes to mass surveillance practices, clarity remains elusive.

Mass Surveillance in America: A Timeline of Loosening Laws and Practices

The evolution of the National Security Agency’s dragnet under Presidents Bush and Obama.

As Need for New Flood Maps Rises, Congress and Obama Cut Funding

Funding to update the nation’s decades-old flood maps has been cut in half in recent years, even as extreme weather has grown more frequent.

Everything We Know About What’s Happened Under Sequestration

What’s actually happened in the two months since the across-the-board budget cuts took effect?

Pay to Prescribe? Two Dozen Doctors Named in Novartis Kickback Case

The drug maker denies wrongdoing, but the Justice Department and a whistleblower say Novartis used cash and meals to get doctors to prescribe its drugs.

What Went Wrong in West, Texas — and Where Were the Regulators?

Seven different agencies regulate fertilizer plants in Texas, but none of them have authority over how close they are to homes and schools.

Can a Judge Really Block the SEC’s Settlement With Steven Cohen?

A ruling in a similar case last year suggests that judges do not have the authority to reject settlements in which firms neither admit nor deny wrongdoing.

Criminal Injustice: The Best Reporting on Wrongful Convictions (#MuckReads)

We've rounded up the best MuckReads on faulty criminal trials: from prosecutors suppressing evidence, to the convicted's continued struggle after exoneration.

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