Lexi Churchill

Research Reporter

Photo of Lexi Churchill

Lexi Churchill is a research reporter for the ProPublica-Texas Tribune Investigative Initiative. Before joining ProPublica, Lexi interned at CNBC, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Columbia Daily Tribune, and KCUR 89.3, Kansas City’s NPR affiliate. Her reporting on the University of Missouri’s Title IX appeals process won the GateHouse Public Service Award for 2018. Lexi graduated from Mizzou in 2019 with a degree in investigative convergence journalism.

Nearly Two Years After Uvalde Massacre, Here Is Where All the Investigations, Personnel Changes Stand

As a grand jury considers whether any law enforcement officers are criminally charged for their inaction during the Robb Elementary shooting, some families say they feel they've been let down and betrayed by elected officials.

Check Your State: Here Are the Active Shooter Training Requirements for Schools and Law Enforcement

No states mandate annual active shooter training for police officers, according to an analysis by ProPublica, The Texas Tribune and FRONTLINE. In comparison, at least 37 states require such training in schools, typically on a yearly basis.

DOJ Blasts Law Enforcement’s Uvalde Shooting Response in New Report, Calls for Agencies to Prioritize Training

In a long-awaited report, the Justice Department found widespread failures in the official response to the 2022 shooting. U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland said that had officers followed accepted practices, “lives would have been saved.”

Reports Analyzing the Police Response to a Mass Shooting Can Leave Unanswered Questions — if They’re Released at All

Even if an after-action investigation is released, a lack of national standards leads to wide variability in the detail of information in reports, ProPublica, The Texas Tribune and FRONTLINE found.

“Someone Tell Me What to Do”

Across the country, states require more training to prepare students and teachers for mass shootings than for those expected to protect them. The differences were clear in Uvalde, where children and officers waited on opposite sides of the door.

Judge Rules Texas DPS Must Release Withheld Documents Related to the Uvalde School Shooting

The ruling marks the first step toward disclosing the extensive collection of police documents, though the state agency could choose to fight the ruling by appealing the decision.

Inside 30 Years of Former NFL Player Kenny Hansmire’s Troubled Businesses

Politicians across the country have allocated millions to the National Child Identification Program. The company stands out as a success amid a decadeslong string of businesses plagued by legal and financial problems.

The Army Increasingly Allows Soldiers Charged With Violent Crimes to Leave the Military Rather Than Face Trial

A federal watchdog called for ending the practice nearly 50 years ago, but the military pushed back. Now, soldiers leave the Army with a negative discharge, avoiding possible federal conviction and with little record of the allegations against them.

Uvalde District Attorney Fights Release of Public Records Against Wishes of Most Families

Joining the Texas Department of Public Safety’s fight against the release of records, the district attorney claims the support of every family who lost a child in the 2022 mass shooting. Attorneys representing many of the families refute that claim.

He Was Accused of Sexual Assault, She of Using Drugs. The Military Dealt With Them Very Differently.

Comparing the cases of Pvt. Olivia Ochoa and Pfc. Christian Alvarado provides a striking example of Army commanders’ uneven use of pretrial confinement.

In the Army, You’re More Likely to Be Detained for Drugs Than Sexual Assault

A first-of-its-kind analysis reveals that, on average, Army soldiers had to face at least eight counts of sexual offenses before their commanders jailed them ahead of trial as often as soldiers charged with drug or burglary crimes.

Twice Accused of Sexual Assault, He Was Let Go by Army Commanders. He Attacked Again.

A first-of-its-kind analysis reveals that soldiers in the Army are more likely to be locked up ahead of trial for drug offenses than for sexual assault under a system that gives commanders control.

Help ProPublica and The Texas Tribune Report on the Military Justice System

We’re looking into how the military investigates service members accused of crimes, intersects with the civilian justice system and treats cases that do not make it to courts-martial. Guide us to important stories.

Texas Agencies Fight Releasing Records That Could Help Clarify Response to Uvalde School Shooting

ProPublica and The Texas Tribune have submitted about 70 requests to state and local agencies for emergency response documentation surrounding the mass shooting at Robb Elementary. Most likely won’t be released publicly for months, if ever.

Carbon Monoxide Killed a Mother and Daughter. A Firefighter Was Reprimanded After a Delayed 911 Response.

After half of a family was found dead from carbon monoxide poisoning, reporting by ProPublica, The Texas Tribune and NBC News revealed that a fire crew had failed to enter the house to check on them. A firefighter has now been disciplined.

U.S. Plans New Safety Rules to Crack Down on Carbon Monoxide Poisoning from Portable Generators

The announcement comes two months after an investigation by ProPublica, The Texas Tribune and NBC News detailed the deadly cost of the government’s failure to regulate portable generators.

El monóxido de carbono que producen los generadores envenena a miles de personas al año. Estados Unidos ha fallado en exigir cambios de seguridad.

Los generadores portátiles están entre los productos de consumo más mortales. Dos décadas después de que el gobierno identificará el peligro, el sistema deja a la gente vulnerable al permitir que la industria se regule a sí misma.

Carbon Monoxide From Generators Poisons Thousands of People a Year. The U.S. Has Failed to Force Safety Changes.

Portable generators are among the deadliest consumer products. Two decades after the government identified the danger, and as climate change leads to more power outages, people are left vulnerable by a system that lets the industry regulate itself.

“La mitad de la familia simplemente desapareció de la noche a la mañana”

Después de atender una llamada al 911 sobre una familia que se había desmayado, equipos de emergencia llegaron a la casa y tocaron la puerta. Como nadie contestó, se marcharon. Adentro, una familia entera estaba siendo envenenada por monóxido de carbono.

“People Will Lose Their Lives”: Texas Isn’t Doing Enough to Prevent Carbon Monoxide Deaths, Critics Say

Months after the deadly gas killed at least 17 Texans during a massive winter storm, lawmakers have failed to take significant action to protect most of the state’s residents.

Follow ProPublica

Latest Stories from ProPublica