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The innocent can wind up in prison. The guilty can be set free. But New York City prosecutors who withhold evidence, tolerate false testimony or commit other abuses almost never see their careers damaged. More »

Claude Stuart, after a career full of trouble as a prosecutor in Queens, finally went too far when he lied to a judge in an effort to convict a man of murder. Thirteen years later, Stuart is no longer a lawyer, the man he convicted remains in prison, and who actually killed Leroy Vann remains unclear. More »

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New York State to Pay Millions in Wrongful Conviction Case

A Brooklyn man who spent more than a dozen years in prison for a crime he likely did not commit will receive $3 million from New York State. He may get even more from New York City.

For a Respected Prosecutor, An Unpardonable Failure

Evidence of a convicted murderer’s possible innocence sat buried in a case file for more than two decades. Now, a prosecutor in Brooklyn will have to answer for the mistake.

Startling Sidebar: Brooklyn Judge Gave Political Advice to Borough’s Top Prosecutor

A New York City Department of Investigation report documents a shocking coziness between the two top law enforcement officials in Brooklyn.

Attorney General Holder Requires Recording of Interrogations, Unlike New York City

A new Department of Justice policy says federal agents must record interrogations, as a way to protect against coercion and false confessions.

Brooklyn Man Walks Out of Court, Cleared of Murder After 24 Years in Prison

Jonathan Fleming and his family were overjoyed today after the Brooklyn District Attorney dismissed murder charges against him based on evidence withheld at his 1990 trial.

Brooklyn DA Moves to Free Man after Long-Buried Evidence Surfaces

Jonathan Fleming has served more than 24 years in prison for a 1989 murder. Now it has emerged that law enforcement had evidence all along showing he was in Florida at the time of the shooting.

MuckReads Podcast: Jim Dwyer on False Convictions

Beat reporting meets high-tech publishing in a new book exploring the science of everyday mistakes that become grave errors in the criminal justice system. Joaquin Sapien hosts.

In Etan Patz Case, The Verdict Is…

Nearly two years after Pedro Hernandez was arrested for murdering Etan Patz, he has yet to have an essential hearing on whether the central evidence against him is even admissible.

Are You Etan Patz?

Even with a suspect awaiting trial for the murder of Etan Patz, the FBI last month still chased down a tip that America’s most famous missing child was still alive.

Podcast: The Etan Patz Case

ProPublica’s Joaquin Sapien and Steve Engelberg discuss the dubious case against Pedro Hernandez in the high-profile disappearance of Etan Patz in 1979.

For Brooklyn Prosecutor, a Troubled Last Term, and a Trail of Lingering Questions

It may take years to assess the lasting damage of Charles J. Hynes’ final term as Brooklyn district attorney.

Missing: A Boy and The Evidence Against His Accused Killer

Three decades after 6-year-old Etan Patz disappeared, police suddenly had a suspect. Then they chose not to record his interrogation, a decision that could affect their case.

Polarizing Brooklyn Prosecutor Retires Amid Scrutiny

Top Brooklyn prosecutor Michael Vecchione is retiring his post after a career spanning more than two decades. He leaves a troubling legacy, including allegations that he convicted an innocent man of murder in a case that could cost New York City millions.

For Brooklyn Prosecutor, a Rare Reversal at the Polls

Prosecutors in New York tend to get elected and stay elected, often for decades. The career of Charles Hynes in Brooklyn invites the question: How long is too long?

For Prosecutor Under Fire, A Verdict at the Polls

It’s been nearly 60 years since an incumbent district attorney in New York City has been removed from office via the vote. Joe Hynes in Brooklyn could be in danger of breaking the streak.

A Powerful Legal Tool, and Its Potential for Abuse

For years, prosecutors in New York have been using what are known as material witness orders to compel testimony from reluctant witnesses in criminal trials. But has the power to persuade led to coercion and tainted convictions?

Less Than Total Recall

A prominent Brooklyn prosecutor, forced to testify under oath about allegations that he had railroaded a possibly innocent man in a murder case 18 years ago, said he had trouble remembering much about the case.

Watching the Detectives: Will Probe of Cop’s Cases Extend to Prosecutors?

A review of 50 Brooklyn murder prosecutions could free men from prison and ruin the reputation of the former detective who helped make the cases. Some insist the prosecutors who worked alongside the accused detective should not be spared scrutiny.

Objection Overruled: Top Prosecutor Must Testify in Wrongful Conviction Case

Brooklyn District Attorney Charles Hynes will be deposed by the lawyer for a man who has accused Hynes of running an office where misconduct is condoned, even rewarded. Hynes, who has denied the allegation, had sought to avoid answering questions under oath, but a federal judge ruled that he must.

Problem Witness: A Case to Make Prosecutors Personally Accountable

Alexina Simon was picked up as a witness in a minor criminal case. Prosecutors in Queens held her over two days without a lawyer. Now, she wants to make them pay for what she says was misconduct.

A Prosecutor, a Wrongful Conviction and a Question of Justice

Jabbar Collins spent 16 years in prison for murder before he won his freedom and a chance to take on the man who put him behind bars. ProPublica examines the career of that prosecutor, Michael Vecchione, the allegations against him, and what strikes many as an inexplicable lack of accountability.

Reversal of Fortune: A Prosecutor on Trial

In the world of abusive prosecutors, Ken Anderson stands out: Anderson, a Texas prosecutor who abused his authority to help send an innocent man to prison for decades, now faces 10 years behind bars for his misconduct.

A Simple Fix: Should New York Compel Judges to Report Problem Prosecutors?

When judges find that prosecutors have abused their authority, other states require them to refer such cases for investigation by disciplinary committees. Should New York follow suit?

Podcast: When Prosecutors Mishandle Cases, Everyone Pays…Except For Them

Prosecutorial misconduct can have devastating consequences for defendants and their families, but the prosecutors themselves rarely receive any disciplinary action. Steve Engelberg and Joaquin Sapien discuss ProPublica's latest investigation into this flawed and tragic system.

Lasting Damage: A Rogue Prosecutor’s Final Case

Claude Stuart, after a career full of trouble as a prosecutor in Queens, finally went too far when he lied to a judge in an effort to convict a man of murder.

Discussion: Who Prosecutes the Prosecutors?

Join reporter Joaquin Sapien and a team of legal experts to discuss our latest investigation into the flawed oversight of prosecutors abusing their authority.

Who Polices Prosecutors Who Abuse Their Authority? Usually Nobody

The innocent can wind up in prison. The guilty can be set free. But New York City prosecutors who withhold evidence, tolerate false testimony or commit other abuses almost never see their careers damaged.

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