Today's accountability news:

  • Shortly after being rescued, survivors of the Deepwater Horizon explosion were presented with waivers by the oil rig’s operator, Transocean, saying they were unharmed and did not "witness" the accident, Talking Points Memo reports.
  • Congressional investigators revealed that a safety device on the oil well "had been so altered that diagrams BP got from the equipment's owner didn't match the supposedly failsafe device's configuration," writes McClatchy.
  • An investigation by The Big Money and the Nation Institute's Investigative Fund describes instances in which employees charged with rooting out fraud in the mortgage and banking industries were fired when attempting to warn superiors about lending practices.
  • A new firm offering to do the work of lobbyists without directly contacting congressmen and without registering its clients – making it nearly impossible to track lobbying -- may represent a new trend on K Street, says The Huffington Post.
  • The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is trying to rally support for an amendment to the Senate financial reform bill that would exempt the "end users" of derivatives from regulation, reports Mother Jones. The amendment was proposed by Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga.

These stories are part of our ongoing roundup of investigations from other news outlets. For more, visit our Investigations Elsewhere page.