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Out of Order

When Prosecutors Cross the Line

The innocent can wind up in prison. The guilty can be set free. But New York City prosecutors who withhold evidence, tolerate false testimony or commit other abuses almost never see their careers damaged.

A Prosecutor, a Wrongful Conviction and a Question of Justice

Jabbar Collins spent 16 years in prison for murder before he won his freedom, and with it a chance to take on the man who put him behind bars. Collins has accused Michael Vecchione, a senior Brooklyn prosecutor, of repeated acts of misconduct, and two federal judges indicated they think he may have a case. ProPublica examines Vecchione’s career, the allegations against him, and what strikes many as an inexplicable lack of accountability.

Reversal of Fortune: A Prosecutor on Trial

In the world of abusive prosecutors – where evidence can be withheld or invented in the name of winning convictions and without fear of punishment – Ken Anderson stands out: Anderson, a Texas prosecutor who abused his authority to help send an innocent man to prison for decades, now faces 10 years behind bars for his misconduct.

A Simple Fix: Should New York Compel Judges to Report Problem Prosecutors?

When judges find that prosecutors have abused their authority, other states require them to refer such cases for investigation by disciplinary committees. Should New York follow suit?

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