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Jessica Huseman

Reporter

Photo of Jessica Huseman

Jessica Huseman is a reporter at ProPublica covering national politics and civil rights. She was previously a senior reporting fellow.

Prior to joining ProPublica, she was an education reporter at The Teacher Project and Slate. A freelance piece she co-authored for ProPublica on nursing regulations sparked a bill in the New York Legislature that would provide additional oversight for nurses who have committed crimes or harmed patients.

She graduated with honors from the Stabile Program in Investigative Journalism at Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, where she was the recipient of the Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship and the Fred M. Hechinger Award for Distinguished Education Reporting. Her stories have been published in The Atlantic, the Dallas Morning News and NPR.

Prior to becoming a journalist, she was a high school history teacher and debate coach in Newark, New Jersey.

Inappropriate Social Media Posts by Nursing Home Workers, Detailed

Below are details of 65 incidents since 2012 in which workers at nursing homes and assisted-living centers shared photos or videos of residents on social media networks. The details come from government inspection reports, court cases and media reports.

Trump Administration Quietly Rolls Back Civil Rights Efforts Across Federal Government

Previously unannounced directives will limit the Department of Justice’s use of a storied civil rights enforcement tool, and loosen the Department of Education’s requirements on investigations.

Trump’s Expected Pick for Top USDA Scientist Is Not a Scientist

Sam Clovis likely to be named undersecretary of the USDA department that manages research on everything from climate change to nutrition.

Texas Voter ID Law Led to Fears and Failures in 2016 Election

Efforts to implement the nation’s strictest voter ID requirements — a solution in search of a problem, according to one critic — foundered amid court defeats, confusion and at least one giant oversight.

Former Director of Anti-Immigration Group Set to Be Named Ombudsman at U.S. Immigration Agency

As FAIR official, Julie Kirchner advocated harsh restrictions on immigrants. Now her job is to provide them assistance.

The Trump Administration Lost Again in Court, This Time on Voter ID

A federal judge ruled that Texas’ voter ID was intended to discriminate against blacks and Latinos. The Department of Justice tried to argue otherwise.

Filing Taxes Could Be Free and Simple. But H&R Block and Intuit Are Still Lobbying Against It.

The makers of TurboTax and other online systems spent millions lobbying last year, much of it directed toward a bill that would permanently bar the government from offering taxpayers prefilled filings.

Justice Department Changes Position on Texas’ Discriminatory Voter ID Law

The DOJ, now overseen by Jeff Sessions, is walking back years of effort aimed at limiting the harmful effect of state voter ID measure on minorities.

Reader Questions Answered on Trump’s Travel Ban

After the weekend’s chaos surrounding President Donald Trump’s executive order banning refugees and visitors from seven majority Muslim countries, we received lots of questions. Here are some answers.

Supreme Court Puts Off Taking Up Texas Voter ID Case

The high court lets stand the findings of lower courts that the strict Texas ID measure discriminated against minorities.

With Trump in Office, Feds May Alter Course in Texas Voter ID Case

DOJ lawyers look to adjourn a hearing next week, and some expect them to wind up abandoning their argument that the Texas voter ID law discriminates against minorities.

Rare Track Record: NYPD’s History Chronicling Hate Crimes

For decades, a hate crimes task force has been on the case in New York. But even that sustained effort may not be catching all crimes.

The Chosen: Who Trump Is Putting in Power

As President Donald Trump picks his top officials, we’re laying out the best accountability reporting on each.

N.C. Governor Loses Re-Election Bid, Attempts to Hold Power by Claiming Voter Fraud

Pat McCrory alleges improper counting, dead people and felons swung the election for Democrat Roy Cooper. Cooper won by fewer than 10,000 votes.

There’s No Evidence Our Election Was Rigged

We had more than 1,000 people watching the vote on Election Day. If millions of people voted illegally, we would have seen some sign of it.

Reporting Recipe: Election Administration Data From Electionland

How to use a federal election administration data set to cover the U.S. elections.

Polling, Explained

Should Media Employees Give to Campaigns?

Stand Up and Be Counted — Maybe

Provisional ballots, meant to ensure every voter gets access to the ballot, are often tossed out.

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