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Jessica Huseman

Reporter

Photo of Jessica Huseman

Jessica Huseman is a reporter at ProPublica covering national politics and civil rights. She was previously a senior reporting fellow.

Prior to joining ProPublica, she was an education reporter at The Teacher Project and Slate. A freelance piece she co-authored for ProPublica on nursing regulations sparked a bill in the New York Legislature that would provide additional oversight for nurses who have committed crimes or harmed patients.

She graduated with honors from the Stabile Program in Investigative Journalism at Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, where she was the recipient of the Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship and the Fred M. Hechinger Award for Distinguished Education Reporting. Her stories have been published in The Atlantic, the Dallas Morning News and NPR.

Prior to becoming a journalist, she was a high school history teacher and debate coach in Newark, New Jersey.

Voter Registration Around Austin Smashed Records. That May Be a Problem.

Travis County received a record 35,000 applications on the final day of voter registration, leaving officials there only days to input the data.

Election Experts: We Need You

If you’re an expert in election administration or election law, and you’re interested in helping us cover voting during the 2018 midterms, here’s how.

The Overlooked Weak Link in Election Security

While attention has focused on the potential to penetrate voting machines, a ProPublica survey found that more than one-third of counties overseeing toss-up congressional elections have email systems that could be vulnerable to hacking.

Election Commission Documents Cast Doubt on Trump’s Claims of Voter Fraud

Thousands of pages of internal records are likely to bolster critics of the short-lived Trump administration commission.

Our Rebuttal to Kris Kobach’s Critique

Press representatives for the Kansas gubernatorial candidate have disseminated charges that a ProPublica article about Kobach’s campaigns for anti-immigration ordinances is inaccurate and biased. We respond.

Kris Kobach’s Lucrative Trail of Courtroom Defeats

For years, the candidate for Kansas governor has defended towns that passed anti-immigration ordinances. The towns have lost big — but Kobach has fared considerably better.

How the Case for Voter Fraud Was Tested — and Utterly Failed

From a new Supreme Court ruling to a census question about citizenship, the campaign against illegal registration is thriving. But when the top proponent was challenged in a Kansas courtroom to prove that such fraud is rampant, the claims went up in smoke.

Covering the Midterms With Electionland 2018

We’re relaunching the Electionland project, which will cover voting in the upcoming congressional elections.

Houston-Area Officials Approved a Plan for Handling a Natural Disaster — Then Ignored It

Harris County foresaw key risks, including a slow response from the Red Cross, but never implemented its strategy.

Trump’s Chosen: Who Made It Through A Year In The Whirlwind?

As the first anniversary of the inauguration approaches, we revisit the roster of Cabinet members and key advisors. Who’s in? Who’s gone? Who’s taking flak from the president?

A Short History of the Brief and Bumpy Life of the Voting Fraud Commission

It never made it to its third meeting, but the friction — and the lawsuits — live on.

Trump’s Voter Fraud Commission Is Gone, But Scrutiny Will Continue

The president dissolved the commission and indicated that the Department of Homeland Security will continue its mission. Experts say DHS won’t achieve the results he wants — and critics won’t back down.

The Breakthrough: Used as ‘Guinea Pigs’ by the U.S. Military, Then Discarded

During World War II, the government subjected thousands of troops to mustard gas tests — and kept it a secret. More than 60 years later, an NPR reporter and researcher helped the men get justice.

The Breakthrough: How Journalists in the Virgin Islands Covered the Disaster Happening to Them

Hurricanes Irma and Maria slammed the Virgin Islands within days of each other, leaving almost everyone without power, internet or phones. Still, The Virgin Islands Daily News pressed on.

Trump Voter Fraud Commission Is Sued — By One of Its Own Commissioners

Maine Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap alleges the group’s leadership is violating transparency laws and has excluded him from deliberations.

The Voter Fraud Commission Wants Your Data — But Experts Say They Can’t Keep It Safe

Newly revealed records show sloppy practices that could put millions of people’s information at risk.

The Breakthrough: Curiosity Drove Her to Call 1,000 People

BuzzFeed’s Rosalind Adams set out to learn why America’s largest psychiatric hospital chain was under investigation. Source by source, she built a case that Universal Health Services was locking up people for profit.

Conflict Mounts Inside Voting Fraud Commission in the Wake of Child Porn Arrest

Two commissioners say they were in the dark not only about the arrest of a researcher for the commission — but also about the fact that he was working there in the first place.

Who’s Really in Charge of the Voting Fraud Commission?

Newly released email data shows two Republican not-yet-members potentially influencing a controversial letter — even as a Democratic member claims he was largely excluded from the process.

Texas Official After Harvey: The ‘Red Cross Was Not There’

Once again, there were appeals for donations to the Red Cross. And once again, local officials are saying the charity hasn’t delivered.

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