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Jessica Huseman

Reporter

Photo of Jessica Huseman

Jessica Huseman is a reporter at ProPublica covering national politics and civil rights. She was previously a senior reporting fellow.

Prior to joining ProPublica, she was an education reporter at The Teacher Project and Slate. A freelance piece she co-authored for ProPublica on nursing regulations sparked a bill in the New York Legislature that would provide additional oversight for nurses who have committed crimes or harmed patients.

She graduated with honors from the Stabile Program in Investigative Journalism at Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, where she was the recipient of the Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship and the Fred M. Hechinger Award for Distinguished Education Reporting. Her stories have been published in The Atlantic, the Dallas Morning News and NPR.

Prior to becoming a journalist, she was a high school history teacher and debate coach in Newark, New Jersey.

Kentucky’s Secretary of State Turns Up Heat in Fight With Elections Board

Alison Lundergan Grimes removed the State Board of Elections’ executive director, a longtime critic of her actions, from a national committee on improving the country’s voting systems.

Kentucky Legislature Passes Bill Stripping Grimes of Authority Over State Board of Elections

The bill takes multiple steps to scale back the level of control Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes has asserted over the board in recent years.

Facebook and Twitter Turned to TurboVote to Drive Registrations. Officials Want Them to Turn Away.

The National Association of Secretaries of State is asking the social media companies to direct prospective voters to government sites after claims TurboVote occasionally failed to properly process registrations, among other missteps.

Kentucky Secretary of State Staff Searched Voting Records for Investigators and Rivals, Records Show

A release by the State Board of Elections shows that two secretary of state staffers used their access to the voter registration system to look up members of an agency currently investigating the office, along with a slew of other state employees.

The Curious Case of a Kentucky Cybersecurity Contract

When Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes hired a firm called CyberScout to address the state’s election security, she was putting her faith in a company that had never tackled such a challenge and had drawn opposition from her staff. They questioned both the hiring process — and the results.

A Power Grab in Kentucky Sparks a Revolt

Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes expanded her sway over Kentucky’s election process with audacity, a willingness to fight — and a board that didn’t appear to be paying close attention. But the conflict isn’t over.

A Onetime Rising Democratic Star Faces Questions About Voter Privacy

Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes, who attained national prominence for a failed Senate run against Mitch McConnell, is taking heat because her staff has routinely examined the voting records of state employees, job applicants and even potential political rivals.

Election Day Was Filled With Frustrations, Claims of Mischief and Glimmers of Hope

Some states had ballot measures aimed at making it easier to vote or designed to take some of the politics out of how electoral districts are drawn up. In nearly every case, Americans seized the opportunity — with what the vote totals suggest was enthusiasm.

Aging Machines, Crowds, Humidity: Problems at the Polls Were Mundane but Widespread

Instead of fireworks from voter intimidation or cyberattacks, Americans grappled with the mundane frustrations of using dated equipment to vote in huge numbers.

Missouri Changed Voter ID Requirements, Citing Confusion. Yet on Election Day, There Was Confusion.

Many reported that they were told they didn’t have valid photo identification, and the situation was a result of a court ruling that allowed Missourians to cast ballots with a range of forms of ID.

Georgia Voters Face Hourslong Waits as State Scrambles to Accommodate Turnout

Voters across the state are facing waits of up to five hours as lines snake out the doors and administrators rush to get additional materials to the polls.

Oops, We Forgot to Plug In the Voting Machine

A few problems are emerging early on Election Day, but one expert said voters “should exhaust all remedies before agreeing to leave.”

How the Election Assistance Commission Came Not to Care So Much About Election Security

Safeguarding voting systems was the top priority of local officials across the country. Some of them say the federal agency specifically charged with helping them was missing in action.

Georgia Officials Quietly Patched Security Holes They Said Didn’t Exist

A ProPublica analysis found that the state was busily fixing problems in its voter registration hours after the office of Secretary of State Brian Kemp, the Republican candidate for governor, had insisted the system was secure.

Voter Registration Around Austin Smashed Records. That May Be a Problem.

Travis County received a record 35,000 applications on the final day of voter registration, leaving officials there only days to input the data.

Election Experts: We Need You

If you’re an expert in election administration or election law, and you’re interested in helping us cover voting during the 2018 midterms, here’s how.

The Overlooked Weak Link in Election Security

While attention has focused on the potential to penetrate voting machines, a ProPublica survey found that more than one-third of counties overseeing toss-up congressional elections have email systems that could be vulnerable to hacking.

Election Commission Documents Cast Doubt on Trump’s Claims of Voter Fraud

Thousands of pages of internal records are likely to bolster critics of the short-lived Trump administration commission.

Our Rebuttal to Kris Kobach’s Critique

Press representatives for the Kansas gubernatorial candidate have disseminated charges that a ProPublica article about Kobach’s campaigns for anti-immigration ordinances is inaccurate and biased. We respond.

Kris Kobach’s Lucrative Trail of Courtroom Defeats

For years, the candidate for Kansas governor has defended towns that passed anti-immigration ordinances. The towns have lost big — but Kobach has fared considerably better.

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