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Chicago’s Gang Database Is Full of Errors — And Records We Have Prove It

Pushing 80 and still gangbanging?

ProPublica Illinois a Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting

The series is the first Pulitzer Prize finalist for ProPublica Illinois, a nonprofit newsroom that launched just six months ago as ProPublica’s first regional, state-based unit.

Six Things We’ve Learned in Six Months

It’s our half-birthday.

Announcing Our Illinois Reporting Project

We have $40,000 to fund investigative journalism on issues critical to our state. Apply now.

Join Our Team in Illinois: We’re Looking for an Engagement and Social Media Reporting Fellow

We’re adding to ProPublica Illinois’ engagement team and looking for someone to help us reach more people with our investigative journalism.

Senators Question HUD’s “Rash” Decision to Close Two Housing Complexes in Southern Illinois

HUD says it doesn’t have the funds to fix up two public housing developments in Thebes, Illinois. The state’s two U.S. senators question whether the agency’s decision to close them — forcing 85 people to relocate — violates federal law.

In Small-Town America, the Public Housing Crisis Nobody’s Talking About

The shuttering of public housing complexes in two small Midwestern towns raises big questions for residents, HUD and Congress. To tell the story, I could use your help.

HUD Long Neglected These Residents. Now As They Move Out, Some Feel HUD Let Them Down Again.

A scramble for housing in southern Illinois has exposed mixed messages and false hope. “It’s betrayal, really,” one resident said of the way she’s been treated by HUD.

How Do You Identify Fake News?

Solid sources and some healthy skepticism can help.

Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan Builds Power From the Ground Up — And Sometimes From the Basement

A polling place in a Chicago home offers a view of the operation run by the state’s most powerful politician.

Takeaways From Our First Free Street Theater Journalism Workshop

Here’s what we learned from our kickoff event in Chicago’s Back of the Yards neighborhood.

New Model Shows Towns on the Wrong Side of an Illinois Levee District Are Treading Water

By building up their own flood protections, some communities have ensured they would be less affected by future floods, while their neighbors would fare worse.

Inside a Secretive Lobbying Effort to Deregulate Federal Levees

The effort seeks to undermine federal rules meant to prevent “levee wars” — where communities race to boost their own flood protection at the expense of their neighbors.

How Overbuilt Levees Along the Upper Mississippi River Push Floods Onto Others

A new analysis of government data shows how levee districts that have raised their levees without federal permits would be better protected against future flooding, while those that follow the rules would see extra flooding.

Seeing Journalism Make a Difference in Election Results

Here’s to getting through the weeds, getting out to vote and the impact of local reporting. But our work isn’t over.

Cook County Assessor Joe Berrios’ Defeat Opens the Door to Reform

Democratic primary winner Fritz Kaegi pledged change, but delivering it won’t be easy.

A Political Boss Goes Down

Cook County Assessor Joe Berrios, one of the last leaders of the old Democratic machine, loses the Democratic primary to a wealthy political newcomer.

Getting to Know Illinois — And You

For a Chicago newbie, learning about a city begins with books, buildings and, especially, people. One thing I’ve figured out: I need a snow shovel.

Flawed Assessments Caused $2 Billion Shift in Property Taxes, Study Finds

Under Cook County Assessor Joseph Berrios, assessment system shaved $1 billion from Chicago’s most expensive homes, while owners of lower-valued homes picked up the tab.

Some States No Longer Suspend Driver’s Licenses for Unpaid Fines. Will Illinois Join Them?

Our analysis shows suspensions tied to ticket debt disproportionately affect motorists in largely black sections of Chicago and its suburbs.

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